With the Advance Pleating & Button Company having shuttered in the Mission, plans to raze its three-building, through-block complex at 750 Florida Street, which stretches to 777 Alabama Street, between 19th and 20th, are in the works.

And as envisioned, an eight-story development, with 94 new condos over 7,240 square feet of modern “Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR)” space and a basement garage for 72 stacked cars, could rise up to 85 feet in height across the site, employing a Density Bonus to build above the 68-foot height limit for the industrial site as currently zoned.

We’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

Recent Articles

Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by The Milkshake of Despair

    This is a nice comprise for PDR zoned areas: have the cake and eat it too. I’m amazed that a button manufacturing company survived operating in the USA, let alone SF for so long.

    • Posted by David Armour

      The Pleating division of the business was clearly propping up the button segment…

  2. Posted by AJ

    Zoning is UMU which allows for housing, but at the land price, plus the Mission we’ll see how far it gets …

  3. Posted by Miraloma Man

    Why so much parking? This isn’t Atlanta, y’know. If they cut back on parking spaces they could put in more dog-washing stations.

  4. Posted by Notcom

    I’m curious about the stacked parking. I understand how it works in a technical sense, and I can see it working OK in a purely private setting – a household – but what about a community setting such as this ?? Is there an attendant to move the “other car” when someone wants out, and if not then do you have to go fetch the other owner ?? Neither of these ideas seem really workable.

    • Posted by bachman_erlich_overdrive

      When the stackers are shared in this manner, there is a frequently a pit into which the the lower car can be lowered so as to provide independent access for the upper stacked car. This does make the installation and implementation more complicated than if you were to simply stack vehicles in your garage.

      • Posted by Notcom

        Thanks!! The section does indeed show some kind of pit, so perhaps that’s the case here. Still it sounds like a major liability issue…no matter how foolproof you try to make it I would think there’s some way someone’s going to hurt themselves and/or damage the other car; or maybe I’m just being pessimistic and it’s really no different than an elevator,

  5. Posted by Keenplanner

    Presumably the parking spaces will be sold or rented ‘unbundled’ from the residential units, so figuring out how to move and remove cars would be up to the residents to figure out. Stacked spaces are slightly better than unstacked spaces but we really need to get serious about reducing or eliminating parking in new buildings. We know that parking means more cars and more traffic, both are major problems in SF. It would be so much better to have a car share or car rental pod available for residents nearby, and more bike parking and dog washing stations.

    • Posted by bachman_erlich_overdrive

      Of all the urban planning challenges we face, a dearth of dog-washing stations should be the first we confront.

      • Posted by Miraloma Man

        Indeed! Too many smelly dogs in this town.

  6. Posted by UnlivableCity

    With its PDR mix and over-population of totally unregulated RV campers, parking in that area is super tight. I only go there using bike share or Uber. Parking isn’t always a bad idea. But I recall the water table is high so lower levels need to be shallow. The development on Bryant across from Blowfish started as office then was rechristened lighter weight residential and to keep the thing from popping out of the ground like a New Orleans coffin they had to infill the planned lower (office) parking leeks with cement. True story.

    • Posted by harvey

      Sorry UC – not a true story: There are 2 levels of parking below one level of below grade residential that daylights onto a sunken courtyard. To overcome the hydrostatic forces you’ve noted, the entire structure is concrete, not wood.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *