A refinement to the State of California’s analytics increased the estimated number of people living in San Francisco with a job to a record 557,800 at the end of 2017 while the city’s unemployment rate was raised from 2.3 to 2.4 percent (the estimated size of the labor force was increased as well).

But employment in San Francisco then dropped by 4,200 in January to 553,600, versus having increased from December to January over the previous three years, pushing the unemployment rate up to 2.6 percent.

That being said, there are still 88,100 more people living in San Francisco with paychecks than there were at the end of 2000, an increase of 116,900 since January of 2010 and 9,400 more than at the same time last year.

In Alameda County, which includes the City of Oakland, the estimated number of people living in the county with a paycheck was upwardly revised from 822,600 to 825,000 at the end of 2017 but then dropped by 4,600 in January to 820,400. And while the unemployment rate inched up to 3.3 percent, there are still 15,500 more people living in the Alameda County with paychecks on a year-over-year basis and 128,400 more since the beginning of 2010.

Across the greater East Bay, employment slipped by 7,300 to 1,364,900 and the unemployment rate inched up from 3.1 to 3.3 percent.

Up in Marin, the number of employed residents was downwardly revised by 1,800 to 137,700 in December but gained 200 in January, which puts the unemployment rate at 2.5 percent.

Down in the valley, employment in San Mateo County was downwardly revised by 2,800 in December to 444,500 and then dropped by 3,100 to 441,400 in January, but remains 7,600 higher than at the same time last year. The unemployment rate inched up to 2.4 percent.

And having been upwardly revised to a record 1,020,700 in December, the number of employed residents in Santa Clara County dropped by 6,100 to 1,014,600 in January, which is only 5,100 higher than at the same time last year, and the unemployment rate ticked up to 2.9 percent versus a record low of 2.4 percent which was set at the end of 2000.

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