Potrero 1010

Speaking of Equity Residential, which just lowered its revenue forecast for 2016, due in part to a recent underperformance in the company’s San Francisco portfolio of apartment projects, the developer has inked a long-term lease with California College of the Arts (CCA) for the 6,000 square feet of Production, Distribution and Repair (PDR) space at the base of its Potrero 1010 development.

Formerly known as Daggett Place, 1000 16th Street or EQR Potrero, the development, which is nearing completion, includes 453 apartments, the aforementioned PDR space (which CCA will use for exhibitions and events), and 20,000 square feet of retail space, 840 square feet of which has been leased to “The Boba Guys.”

Potrero 1010: Daggett Park Site

And of course, the project includes the future Daggett Park which will occupy the one-acre space between Potrero 1010’s two structures and be turned over to the city upon completion but maintained by Equity Residential.

Daggett Park Rendering

In addition to Potrero 1010, Equity Residential is also under construction on over 800 units at One Henry Adams and 855 Brannan, which should open late this year and early next, and 348 apartments at 340 Fremont which will be ready for occupancy in a couple months.

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Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by Dave

    These buildings look awful – on a positive note at least there will be shrubs in between.

    Any idea of what rents will be for the 453 apartments?

    • Posted by Futurist

      So great to see this well designed, appropriately scaled, modern OF THIS TIME development almost complete. A great addition to once was pretty much a wasteland.

      I hope we see more of this around the perimeter of Mission Bay.

    • Posted by Brad

      I walk past these buildings all the time and enjoy the splash of color in what was previously a very bleak stretch of the street. Glad to see Boba Guys in there as well; those guys are on a real growth spurt.

  2. Posted by folderpete

    Aren’t both of these “affordable”? (does that answer your question)

  3. Posted by David Baker

    Hi, this is David Baker FAIA of David Baker Architects. After 11 years of work we’re very happy to see this design near completion. It’s a complex design, with a public park, active ground floor with retail and flex space, PDR that is becoming the studio space for CCA, and a “through block passage”, a recent Planning Department concept that is shaping up very nicely.

    I’ll be leading a SPUR bike tour in August which will feature a tour of this project. And as a note, 90 of the apartments have been rented to people who meet the 50% of AMI criteria, which is fairly deep “workforce” affordability. That’s a significant quantity and quality of affordability, and illustrates how important a source of affordable housing the private sector can be.

    • Posted by Futurist

      Thanks David. Another excellent and interesting urban project for our city by your talented firm!

  4. Posted by jj

    I think they look pretty cool. Much better than that glued together foam and stucco faux bay window crap.

  5. Posted by Senna300

    The all metal one looks nice, but I hate the punched metal used on the balconies of the other building. It’s similar to the one they used on the Azure. It’s tacky and already looks cheap and dated, which is sad considering it was just built. I’m all for modern design but it needs to have the ability to age well.

  6. Posted by johny

    I agree. The perforated metal shades added to the black tiled building on 388 Fulton @ Gough look tacky and gimmicky too. Its important to know when to stop.

  7. Posted by Jim

    Actually I find these punched metal balconies sophisticated and artful.

  8. Posted by Louis

    This could look very good built– could is the operative word — it is all in the quality of the details and execution. Personally I am beyond tired of low rise bay window redo a la almost everything new in hayes valley now.

    Not very much window area in many rooms here , but thats another question.

    Ageing is a huge issue a Senna just said, both in terms of physical materials, and designs that have a very short date-stamp on them.

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