March 18, 2009

We Gave You The Jump, Now Some New Renderings: 3119 Harrison

3119 Harrison: Rendering

The website for the Dawson&Clinton two-unit building rising at 3119 Harrison is live, and we’re digging what we see. Full-floor (or near full-floor) master suites with modern baths.

3119 Harrison: Third Floor Plan

Two other bedrooms and at least two other baths; 600 square foot roof-top decks with views and spas; and Bulthaup kitchens with islands and a folding wall that opens to green.

3119 Harrison: Kitchen/Dining Rendering

UPDATE (3/20): One of the two units at 3119 Harrison has hit the MLS. Asking $2,370,000 or $790 per square foot.

3119 Harrison [3119harrison.com]
Coming (Not So) Soon To An Empty Lot (3119 Harrison) Next Year [SocketSite]
We’ll Give You The Jump Once Again: 3119 Harrison On The Market [SocketSite]

First Published: March 18, 2009 12:15 PM

Comments from "Plugged In" Readers

I was going to remodel my place with Dawson-Clinton but canceled at the last minute.

Does anyone have any experience, positive/negative or otherwise?

Their proposal was around 700k I think, but was very exhaustive.

Posted by: jessep at March 18, 2009 12:23 PM

I am going to start calling myself a residential visionary too.

Posted by: sparky-c at March 18, 2009 12:30 PM

BTW: If anyone has any info about how they do roof-deck landscaping and the hot tub stuff?

Much appreciated.

Posted by: jessep at March 18, 2009 12:34 PM

I have a question about the weird style that all these new SF buildings have. It is sort of a neo-funkis style, and I wonder how it all arose. I think I have it figured out:

CORNER OFFICE ENVY !!

I'm not kidding. In the old days, people wanted their house to look like a copy of a palace, or a plantation, or a french castle, so they could feel like nobility.

Now they want their home to look like an international business headquarter, with a boardroom (kitchen/dining) and a corner office with a view (workspace, home ofice, den, whatever). All in the style of a law office. Scary,

Am I wrong? I'm feeling like I suddenly stumbled upon the explanation here.

Posted by: Jus7tme at March 18, 2009 1:11 PM

Jus7tme - that theory makes all kinds of sense. I like a homey home.

On the other hand, I think a nice minimal look can be homey too. But it takes a bit of care and a good eye to look simple rather than sterile.

Posted by: kthnxybe at March 18, 2009 1:18 PM

location, location, locatoin

Posted by: anon at March 18, 2009 1:29 PM

I think one can make it homey. But one can also put up some cubicles for the kids in the living room, next to the corner office :-).

Posted by: Jus7tme at March 18, 2009 1:37 PM

are those permanent slats over all those windows? do people want windows like that, permanently partially obstructed by an exterior wood lattice?

it looks sort of cool now (i'm sure it will date itself quickly) but hardly seems nice to live inside of.
anybody live in something like this? does it feel like a prison? or does the light pass through nicely and it only obstructs people looking in but not you looking out?
I'm definitely not fond of the look in the picture of the bedroom on the website... but maybe it looks better in person.

the rooftop decks are very nice. I actually like the back of the house better than the front.

the look of the building is wonderful except if that is corrugated metal on the outside... I'd change that.

overall seems to be a good project to me.

[Editor's Note: We'll note the wooden slats primarily obscure the master bath windows which some of the more modest folks might appreciate...]

Posted by: ex SF-er at March 18, 2009 1:55 PM

Regarding location: this is across the street from a block of mature sycamores (with a school behind) which should make for a pretty if not quiet outlook. Plans are moving forward on the Cesar Chavez narrowing and tree planting next year, which will help the 'hood continue to improve. Precita Park is already nice, getting better. North Bernal has a great mix of traditional and modern buildings.

http://www.sfgov.org/site/uploadedfiles/planning/City_Design_Group/CDG_mission_cesarchavez.htm

Posted by: Snark17 at March 18, 2009 2:22 PM

I agree with kthnxybe.
The location of that place is not really a good fit for that home. That neighborhood (which I lived close to (26th/mission) is just not what I would call a nice or even "up & coming" neighborhood.

The traffic on Army St is horrible @ times and the proximity to the housing project right on the other side of Army St is def the deal breaker.

Posted by: dotcomer at March 18, 2009 2:53 PM

I agree with dotcomer that the Army St traffic can be bad and the corner by the projects is dicey. Not sure I would spend my 1.5 mil or whatever on these flats. However as someone living around Precita it's great to see some of the neglected lots and non-descript houses given such a creative makeover. The area is improving quickly and the park has a nice feel to it.

Posted by: Snark17 at March 18, 2009 3:16 PM

Are there corner offices like that? Methinks not many.

Institutional contexts like auditoriums, transit stations, and malls are what comes to my mind in a scan for similar feeling spaces. Popular science fiction might also be an influence.

Posted by: Mole Man at March 18, 2009 3:54 PM

[Editor's Note: We'll note the wooden slats primarily obscure the master bath windows which some of the more modest folks might appreciate...]

not sure I agree.
by the pic above, half of the front of the building is covered in those slats, and the entire left side of the building as well.

pic #6 on the website shows that the entire bedroom wall is walled off with that stuff... although there is an open window on the other side of the room.

I'd have to see it in person to see if I'd like this or not. perhaps it's only the bathrooms, and also bedrooms that have another wall of windows?

a lot depends on what is slatted off and what isn't.

[Editor’s Note: We should have been more specific. You’re correct about one of the smaller bedrooms on the second floor, but otherwise they only cover the master bath on the third (reference the blueprints online).]

Posted by: ex SF-er at March 18, 2009 4:26 PM

Regarding this style of housing, I have noticed that in other cities during this downturn, what buyers there are left are choosing more traditional style homes and architecture. I like modern myself, but in Chicago as an example, ultra modern DWELL style townhouses are sitting, while a traditional Victorian next door will sell. Down in the desert where we have a vacation home, I am sorry to see that new developements are turning away from "desert modernism" and instead choosing spanish or mediterranean styles. I will always like modern and choose to live in a modern dwelling, but are buyers now choosing traditional architecture in some sort of "flight to quality" during this recession?

Posted by: anoncensorious at March 18, 2009 4:38 PM

"Now they want their home to look like an international business headquarter, with a boardroom (kitchen/dining) and a corner office with a view (workspace, home ofice, den, whatever). All in the style of a law office."

It is just us some do not care for chintz sofas, potted palms, and wainscoting.

Posted by: flaneur at March 18, 2009 5:15 PM

anoncensorious, truth be told I prefer modern to faux-vintage when it comes to new construction. There's nothing more jarring to me than pre-fab egg-and-dart molding in a brand new house.

But I think maybe it's difficult to do really well. Perhaps the time is ripe for architecture to really break out into a 21st century style that is still soothingly minimal while being more domestic and comfortable.

Posted by: kthnxybe at March 18, 2009 5:22 PM

"Perhaps the time is ripe for architecture to really break out into a 21st century style that is still soothingly minimal while being more domestic and comfortable. "

I could not agree more. Some of my favorite architects were little noticed Bay Area regionalist architects who did modern homes in the 50's and 60's that were not following the latest trends, but instead had a sort a minimalist design that was both West Coast and Asian. They used natural materials, especially wood, and to me at least, they are not nearly as dated as some other homes from the 60's are.

Posted by: anoncensorious at March 18, 2009 6:05 PM

anoncensorious, I'd love to learn more about mi-century modern and would appreciate it if you could post some of your favorite local architects. (sorry to pull this off-topic)

Posted by: steve at March 18, 2009 6:20 PM

"Some of my favorite architects were little noticed Bay Area regionalist architects who did modern homes in the 50's and 60's that were not following the latest trends, but instead had a sort a minimalist design that was both West Coast and Asian. They used natural materials, especially wood, and to me at least, they are not nearly as dated as some other homes from the 60's are."

The warmth that the natural materials add without fussiness is what I love the best when it comes to mid century homes. (And what I love about Arts & Crafts for that matter.) I agree with Steve - anoncensorious, links to your favorite stuff, please!

(And yes, I apologize for thread hijacking too.)

Posted by: kthnxybe at March 18, 2009 6:41 PM

And then the question remains - how to do that warmth without preciousness nowadays? What type of materials make sense now, both ecologically and cost-wise?

Some people really like a glass staircase, and I don't think it has to look "mall like." It's hard to tell from renderings anyway.

I am not putting down 3119 Harrison so much as wondering where good design is headed off to. I have liked some of the pre fab/modular homes on fablist, for instance.

Posted by: kthnxybe at March 18, 2009 6:47 PM

(errm, that's not a glass staircase, I don't think, but glass staircase is my personal shorthand for that ultra modern look.) ;-)

Posted by: kthnxybe at March 18, 2009 6:49 PM

To answer Steve's request:

Some of my favorite Mid-Century modernists who were trying to work with woods and a more Asian/West Coast aesthetic include; Charles Warren Callister, John Marsh Davis (Zen-modern houses in the 60's in Marin County), Mario Corbett, Beverley David Thorne, Campbell and Wong, and Mark Mills down in Big Sur/Carmel. These designers and others had developed a NORTHERN CALIFORNIA style that was both natural and contextural and seemed to fit within the landscape, culture, and in my opinion, they have aged well and are sought after.

I guess this is way off topic, and I apologize to the editor. I like 3119 Harrison, but in some strange way it already seems dated to me because it is part of an over used vocabulary that will be in the future a reminder of the now vanished real estate bubble.

Posted by: anoncensorious at March 18, 2009 7:18 PM

Check out the book "Forgotten Modern (California Houses 1940 - 1970)" as a good source for some of these designers (not all were architects). Also, I forgot to add Jack Hillmer, who did some fantastic mid-century homes in the Bay Area that had the NorCal-Pacific-Asian style with lots of natural materials. (Thanks to the editor for allowing this off topic sidebar.) I do like 3119 Harrison because it does take a strong design position and hope they find success.

Posted by: anoncensorious at March 19, 2009 5:00 PM

One of the two units at 3119 Harrison has hit the MLS. Asking $2,370,000 or $790 per square foot.

Posted by: SocketSite at March 20, 2009 9:26 AM

I told you there was a prime Bernal. I can now narrow "prime" down from north face with view to 3119 Harrison.

Posted by: sparky-c at March 20, 2009 9:31 AM

2.37M for both unit? Sweet!

Wait... 2.37M each unit? LOL.

Posted by: San FronziScheme at March 20, 2009 9:38 AM

Drove by this today, still nothing going on. Did they run out of money?

Posted by: sparky-b at May 20, 2010 12:03 PM

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