December 24, 2008

San Francisco’s Sava Pool: From Rendering To Reality

San Francisco’s Sava Pool: View from 19th

A bit of San Francisco architectural beauty to end the holiday week (but not quite year).

San Francisco’s Sava Pool: Interior

The Charlie Sava Pool: Commissioned by the City of San Francisco, Rec and Park Dept, designed by Mark Cavagnero Associates & Paulett Taggart Architects, built by West Bay Builders, and photographed by Tim Griffith (click to enlarge).

San Francisco’s Sava Pool: View from Wawona

And some plugged-in tipster bonus verbiage for our design (and swimming) wonks:

The building essentially comprises of 2 simple interlocking volumes - one for the pool (natatorium) and the other for the support areas (lockers, lobby, community room, staff areas, storage)- enjoying a symbiotic relationship, nestled in the park. The exterior is a composition of cast in place concrete, handcrafted tile and curtain wall.
The generous exterior sunshade/ interior light shelf running the length of glazing on the south facade, reduces glare while allowing sweeping views of stern grove across the street.
The concrete on the exterior reads as concrete on the interior, the glass reads as glass and the handcrafted tile translates to wood slats with acoustic foam on the interior. In the Natatorium, 4 Ceiling suspended clouds provide a taut reflective surface to the uplights (that must be above the pool deck for easy access) and also conceal additional acoustic material above it.
The City's new standard required a UV filtration system be installed to complement the chlorine system, thus dramatically improving indoor air quality and virtually eliminating the 'typical pool smell' making the experience of swimming more enjoyable and healthier.
The natatorium roof has about 3,500 sq ft of solar hot water panels, which help capture solar energy and partially offset the heating cost of the pool water, helping the City reduce its running cost.

Cheers. Happy holidays. And as always, thank you for plugging in.

Charlie Sava Pool Status And Design: Eight Lanes Opening In A Week [SocketSite]

First Published: December 24, 2008 4:30 PM

Comments from "Plugged In" Readers

Right on. Good stuff for a good neighborhood.

Posted by: SFer at December 24, 2008 4:44 PM

Handsome understated design and a welcome addition to the sunset.

Posted by: mike at December 24, 2008 5:32 PM

I can not wait to cannonball into that bad boy.

Posted by: Sparky-C at December 24, 2008 6:38 PM

Real SF is jealous.

Posted by: sf at December 24, 2008 10:49 PM

Beautiful building. I learned how to swim in the old one, and can still 'smell' the memories. Great job to those who built it.

Posted by: sparky at December 24, 2008 11:57 PM

Merry Christmas SocketSite! Thank you for faithfully reporting one side of the real estate story all year long. And may all your real estate dreams come true.

Posted by: sanfrantim at December 25, 2008 11:20 AM

It looks beautiful, can't wait to swim there. Does anyone know how much is it to swim there?

Posted by: katebear at December 25, 2008 11:12 PM

$4! Happy New Year

Posted by: sf at December 26, 2008 12:19 AM

Awesome.

CAMP naysayers, take notice: go visit the pool, experience its relationship to the park, talk to the users. This is the type of progressive architecture that SF needs to remain a vital, living city.

Happy New Year!

Posted by: l.kahn at December 28, 2008 10:19 AM

Awesome.

CAMP naysayers, take notice: go visit the pool, experience its relationship to the park, talk to the users. This is the type of progressive architecture that SF needs to remain a vital, living city.

Happy New Year!

Posted by: l.kahn at December 28, 2008 10:19 AM

Kahn - my objection to CAMP was never the design - it was the prominent placement at the head of the Parade Ground that I found objectionable.

Posted by: Fishchum at December 28, 2008 11:55 AM

Mark Cavagnero does consistently good, classy work. Bravo!

Posted by: zzzzzz at December 29, 2008 8:40 AM

Ugly. It'd be nice if architects would stop using all right angles and concrete do define beauty. This design is unimaginative, blocky, and unworthy of a public space.

So sad that we've gone from beautiful designs like the Conservatory of Flowers to monstrosities like this and the new concrete battleship SF Federal building in less than a century.

Architectural imagination is indeed dead.

Posted by: Gregg at January 1, 2009 11:49 AM

I agree "beautiful" is an overstatement this building is not generic because there are two triangles on top welcome to the 21st century.

Posted by: sf at January 4, 2009 7:46 PM

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