1158 Sutter Street (www.SocketSite.com)
What we know about 1158 Sutter Street: the final condo map for 15 units was approved late last year, and while the website remains “Coming Soon,” they’ve begun advertising two-bedroom/two-bath units starting at $669,000 (including Bertazzoni stoves, Cesar stone counters in the kitchen, and fireplaces). “Deeded-secured-parking” is also mentioned but we don’t know how many spots or if it will be offered a la carte.
What we don’t know about 1158 Sutter: much of anything else. Readers?
1158 Sutter Street [1158sutter.com] [Map]

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Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by anonm

    Mmmm….right near the heart of the ‘Loin. Good luck with that one.

  2. Posted by Jeffrey W. Baker

    Only half a block off the up-and-coming lower Polk corridor. Plenty of bars and restaurants already entrenched. The real downsides to this address are living across the street from the cut-rate funeral home and the big auto repair shop, and next-door to the center for troubled youth (yes, seriously).

  3. Posted by gh

    I walk home to Cow Hollow from downtown and usually use Bush St. in the afternoons. At the corner of Bush and Van Ness, I swear some days a bus full of crazy people has overturned, spilling them all over the street and sidewalk. There are delusional street people literally EVERYWHERE on those blocks south of California St. I am ignorant as to the mental health facilities nearby, but there are some seriously whacky (and whacked out) people in that neighborhood.

  4. Posted by anon

    I like that there isn’t an ugly parking garage entry with cars looking to mow down pedestrians at the front of the building – is there parking accessed from the street behind? If so, we need more buildings like this, that pay attention to the pedestrian streets and treat the back streets as the traffic sewer.

  5. Posted by r

    You forgot to mention Nikki’s massage parlor next door, and R Bar. You can guarntee a healthy crowd infront of your door on Friday & Saturday night.

  6. Posted by Michael

    Whatever. What dumb comments. I live in this neighborhood. It’s a great place to live. It’s called an urban environment.

  7. Posted by tony

    What we know about 1158 Sutter Street: it’s fugly

  8. Posted by Tweety

    I like it! I wish it was 2X as tall.

  9. Posted by dude1

    I like the architecture- nice color, brickwork, large bright windows, solid hard lines and shape. Sophisticated. We need more of this in San Francisco, and less fake Victorian and bay window crap.

  10. Posted by dude1

    Michael- I agree- dumb comments from people who don’t live in the neighborhood. I used to live on Gough and Sutter, and I loved this neighborhood. So vibrant, colorful, sophisticated, accessible, and a great city experience. It is not in the heart of the ‘loin, it is a few blocks away yes. And yes, it is an urban environment, if you are not street smart enough to understand when it is good time to be alone outside, then you shouldn’t be living here, or in any city with over 80,000 population. And don’t get me started on the ‘O Mah Gawd I saw a homeless person yucky!!” Some people just don’t have very strong personalities…

  11. Posted by Jeffrey W. Baker

    Well if there’s anything SocketSite has taught us, it’s that people who read SocketSite don’t actually want to live in a city. They want to live in a high-rise with deeded parking and a freeway ramp directly into their spacious kitchens.
    Note however that you can’t compare Sutter @ Gough with Sutter @ Larkin. At Gough you have the Majestic Hotel and hundreds of old Japanese ladies. At Larkin you have meth addicts, bar patrons, and the deceased. Larkin may be up-and-coming but Gough arrived long ago.

  12. Posted by dude1

    Jeffrey- yes I understand, Gough is a way nicer neighborhood *end pompous snobbery* but I was talking about the neighborhood on the other side of van ness which I would go to ‘live’ for the sake of living. There is just so much great great stuff there it is a shame for somebody to just gloss over it because they saw a drug dealer or a bum. Sutter is actually a very underrated street IMO. I would move back there in a heartbeat, even on the other side of Van Ness. There is some very stately architecture to be found on Sutter as well, that is in much better condition than what you would find in the ‘loin, some of it could actually be confused for Nob Hill (which it is actually lower Nob Hill) or Pac Heights.

  13. Posted by afib

    Yeah, you’re right, this is a lovely area…one of the city’s best! What was I thinking? The quality of buildings and tenants down there is just superb! “Vibrant, colorful, sophisticated bums, and accessible for pimps!”. It has it all! Bring on the highrise condos and watch everyone relocate from other areas of our great city!
    REALITY CHECK: It’s a SEWER and always has been.

  14. Posted by amused

    “Well if there’s anything SocketSite has taught us, it’s that people who read SocketSite don’t actually want to live in a city. They want to live in a high-rise with deeded parking and a freeway ramp directly into their spacious kitchens.”
    Outstanding comment. Bravo.

  15. Posted by anon

    As the market slows, we’ll be seeing more blog profiles of the likes of these non-descript uninteresting buildings. As well as descript buildings such as The Hayes which will get extensive play by play coverage. (the window film is about to come off, it’s half way off, a few more days…). I don’t mind it tho it reminds of 1987 when the moldering city was in a deep sleep & time stood s t i l l.

  16. Posted by spencer

    What we don’t know about 1158 Sutter: much of anything else. Readers?
    Well, we know it is in the ghetto. We know that polk corridor has the most assaults of any area in SF outside of bayview. we know that people will be smoking crack on your doorstep and we know that loud drunken souless rats will be outside your door at R bar every thurs-sat.
    The funeral home across the street is the nicest thing within a 2blk radius.

  17. Posted by Michael

    Thanks for the additional comments. I obviously did not mean to say that this area is perfect, but I’ve lived on or near Sutter between Van Ness and Leavenworth for over 12 years, and it’s so much better than it used to be. It’s totally an urban environment, with all the good and bad that entails. It might still be rough around the edges, but it’s convenient, AND we’ll be getting a Trader Joe’s soon!

  18. Posted by afib

    Thank you Spencer…I think some of the folks in this conversation got ahold of some of that low quality crack, thinking there is some great urban experience going on down there. (I actually like the walk through there at about 7am in the morning because it is so dicey, it adds some spice to my otherwise boring day downtown) reading all there delusional blogs. Polk Corridor characters put the Market St. crazzies to shame, seriously. Swan’s is the exception out there though.

  19. Posted by Michael

    Spencer, you are a sad, unelightened fool (and I mean that as respectfully as possible) if you think this area is the ghetto. To people like you, the ghetto is anything where everyone isn’t just like you, and where you never have to deal with anything unpleasant. Where’s the fun in that? As others have said, you probably don’t belong in such a dense city. There are far safer locales for sensitive persons as yourself.

  20. Posted by Timosha

    Many will see this as a great location, myself among them. There’s lots going on nearby and it’s close to the FiDi.
    The building looks too short and squat for its central location, though, its neighbor to the right notwithstanding. Even just six or seven floors floors would’ve been more appropriate.

  21. Posted by gh

    It doesn’t take a “sensitive” person to know a rathole when he sees one. This will sound quite pompous, but unless your destitute, why would you live down there?

  22. Posted by redseca2

    This neighborhood has never been the same since Hoot Judkins unfinished furniture closed.

  23. Posted by alex

    Its seems that some commenters equate an urban environment with a healthy population of homeless people and the host of problems that come with them. I have been to many major cities all over Europe (and Japan). I even lived in Paris for 6 months. I have never seen a homeless problem as visible as the one we have here. As the parent of a two-year-old, I have serious reservations about remaining here because of the homeless presence (especially in the parks). There is a reason SF has the lowest children per capita of any major American city. Seems like SF prefers homeless over children.

  24. Posted by zzzzzzz

    “Its seems that some commenters equate an urban environment with a healthy population of homeless people and the host of problems that come with them…”
    Bingo! There are plenty of diverse, stimulating, cosmopolitan cities all over the country– starting with New York and Chicago– that have enough self-respect to not permit their streets to become sewers. Shame on San Francisco for equating squalor with sophistication and enlightenment.

  25. Posted by Damion

    This is a great project. People who are complaining about the neighborhood? Look at the prices that were quoted. Under $700k for a two-bedroom with parking, east of Van Ness! That’s wonderful!
    I also love the commercial space at the ground floor. These new smaller projects with retail at ground level are what will improve the street life of San Francisco — not the massive projects where all the street-level stuff is hidden away inside courtyards, or is never utilized at all, such as The Brannan with its still-vacant commercial floor, or almost any other big development that we’ve seen.
    I want to see more and more and more of this stuff, please!

  26. Posted by Jules

    “Its seems that some commenters equate an urban environment with a healthy population of homeless people and the host of problems that come with them…”
    I could not agree more with this comment also. You will see again and again where people will put down a listing in Cow Hollow or some other area as not being in an “interesting” neighborhood because it is not the “real” San Francisco. So are some of you saying that San Francisco is homeless screamers yelling through the night while picking through trash cans and pooping on doorsteps? Some of you really need to get out of S.F. more often and travel to other “world class” cities to see what they are like, but one thing I notice is that cab drivers in London, Paris, New York and Chicago never remind me that their city is “world class”.
    Now, as for this building, couldn’t they have tried a little on the design? Here is a place where the bad location might be worth the risk if the building was something really creative and unique. Instead, we get an ugly structure in a brutal neighborhood.

  27. Posted by snooze

    I’m learning great stuff from this site but the above snobby and fearful comments make me wanna vomit all over rincon hill. I have always wondered why people like you live here when there are other places that would suit you so much better.

  28. Posted by Mole Man

    The basic form is good, but again what is it that makes sloppy venting okay? Vents can be disguised by ornament or other features or brought together in vertical stacks. Here they just poke right through the exterior facade in a way that has already left unsightly drip trails. Did the builders think that this building would not get rained on? Vents looks much better if truly integrated into the design.

    I don’t get the generalizations about the neighborhood and fellow readers. Everyone has different preferences. That is one of the reasons such a place as San Francisco exists in the first place!

    As long as the homeless and the soulless nonurban yuppies don’t somehow join forces we should be able to make it through this.

  29. Posted by anon

    Snooze, are you saying that we should embrace the homeless/drug/crime/pooping/trash-on-streets problems instead of wanting to see them changed? Does this make us “snobby”, and my favorite response form you which is, if you don’t like it here, LEAVE! How Nixonian. (If you didn’t like his war, you were told to leave America) What if I have lived here longer than you, AND, remember when San Francisco was safer and cleaner? Why should we tolerate what is happening on so many streets? Name another American city with a homeless problem that is more in your face than San Francisco?
    There is no reason you cannot still love this city, but keep your eyes open at the same time to the problems, which in some cases are getting worse. I live in the (Gasp) Marina, which I am sure to you and some others is not an “urban” neighborhood, since it is still mostly clean and safe. Being urban does not mean hearing howls, gunshots, and trash cans being knocked over. Being urban does not require walking around urine and feces on sidewalks and doorsteps. Let’s try to fix San Francisco, and the first step is to admit that there are problems. They are asking $700,000 to live on this block. Please be the first to sign up and buy into this neighborhood that is so charming.

  30. Posted by spencer

    “Spencer, you are a sad, unelightened fool (and I mean that as respectfully as possible) if you think this area is the ghetto. To people like you, the ghetto is anything where everyone isn’t just like you, and where you never have to deal with anything unpleasant. Where’s the fun in that? As others have said, you probably don’t belong in such a dense city. There are far safer locales for sensitive persons as yourself.”
    Would I be more enlightened if i were to put up with out of control violent crime and homelessness? Everything you say is very far from the truth about me. i have spent quiet a bit of time in the soup kitchen jsut down the street and grew up in a much rougher place than this. San Francisco doesn’t have to be this unsafe. it is small and the city wastes a lot of money on ineffective programs for homelessness and drug abuse. Polk corridor (between Sutter and Golden Gate) does have the highest violent crime rate in SF outside of Bayview. Instead of choosing to live in a less dense place, i choose to change the one I live in. It’s people like you who want to roll around in their squalor, or encourage others to do so, who should pick up and move. $700K for a an apt in the middle of the loin is not reasonable. people should know what they are getting into. Would you want your sister or your mother living in this neighborhood? i sure as hell wouldn’t. If I have to face rampant drug abuse, defecating on the street, rampant prostitution and fear of violent crime, then I sucre as heck expect a discount on the property.
    To me, “interesting” and “destitute” are not the same. And honestly I don’t give a crap what a person looks like. outward appearances are just that. it’s a person’s thoughts and actions that make them interesting to me, no matter where they live.

  31. Posted by snooze

    1. you have no idea how long i have lived here.
    2. i do think there are problems that need to be addressed.
    3. i never used the word urban.
    4. i do think the marina is urban as i do noe valley.
    5. i love the tenderloin and surrounding areas.
    6. i’m not happy to see homeless people or anyone struggling.
    7. i have no idea how long you have been here and i don’t care.
    8. words like “ghetto” “rathole” “sewer” “homeless screamer” “brutal” and “bus full of crazy people” are not words i want to hear about the place we live and love.
    9. people using language like that are likely not concerned with solving the issues here.
    10. i love the marina.
    11. i love the mission.
    12. i love bayview.
    13. i’m not saying love it or leave it. i want to, but i’m not. just saying i wonder why someone would want to stay if they feel so negative about it.
    14. i love rincon hill. i wouldn’t live there in a million years for a million dollars, but i love it.
    15. there are a lot of homeless people here because the weather is mild unlike other awesome cities like new york and chicago, just sayin.
    16. no i’m not saying that we should embrace the homeless/drug/crime/pooping/trash-on-streets problems instead of wanting to see them changed. my posting wasn’t even that long.
    17. i love san francisco.

  32. Posted by John

    SS attracts a lot of negative people – they don’t like anything, whether it is urban, suburb, high-rise, old, new, or anything….
    Don’t believe me? Take some of the most negative people here, and search their posts, and see if they ever said anything positive about anything…
    There is no point getting upset by them. Move on now.

  33. Posted by movingback

    @ John – you said it, my friend!

  34. Posted by Zig

    the comments section of this site resembles a huge feedback loop; it goes round and round, back and forth, no matter what the post is about. And somehow no matter the topic Chicago seems to be mentioned
    Anyhow, my two cents is I don’t like the bums but do like the Pho at Turtle Tower and the food at Thai House Express. Lots of great restaurants near to here
    And I don’t consider Sutter the heart of anywhere

  35. Posted by yao

    1. this is a bad neighborhood.
    2. there are lots of interesting restaurants/places near here.
    i don’t know if it’s really worth $670 though. who knows, maybe the places are really big and have great finishings. but i doubt it.

  36. Posted by Dan

    Spencer wrote:
    “Instead of choosing to live in a less dense place, i choose to change the one I live in.”
    What are you doing to change San Francisco?

  37. Posted by anonandon

    The building is not “bad”, and I think we can all agree this is not Presidio Heights, but the real point of some of the negative comments is being lost which is, would YOU pay over $700,000 to live on this block? As has been shown on this site in the last couple of weeks, there are single family homes now available in the city for less money. I would have no problem if these units were around 400,000, but how are they going to compete with all of the SOMA “loft” inventory which is being priced less per sq. ft. than these units?

  38. Posted by etslee

    I live in this general area, and can see both positives and negatives. For me, the convenience of being within walking distance of Union Square, J-town, Chinatown and my work beats the “up and coming” neighborhood problems. I won’t downplay the pain of having to wash up all sorts of filth in our street front however. It’s DISGUSTING!
    There’s also a huge difference between renting in this area and actually owning a place. I initially rented, and the homeless problem didn’t bother me that much.

  39. Posted by frank

    If you people think the sutter and larkin area is rough now, you should have been here back in the 80’s. The Tenderloin today is nothing like it used to be.
    Celebrate diversity. San Francisco has a place for everyone and some of us prefer to live in the Tenderloin/Polk Gulch area even though we could afford to live elsewhere.

  40. Posted by snafu

    jesus homeless people != diversity. Homeless people = crime, drugs and generally shitty place to live and raise kids. Why is that so hard to accept. So since NYC has a smaller homeless population then it’s less diverse ?

  41. Posted by spencer

    “What are you doing to change San Francisco?”
    In the past year, I ahve volunteerd more that 10 days of my time at local parks (gardening and cleanup), 2 days at the soup kitchen in the loin ( repackaging foods for homeless) and 4 days reading to local “at risk” kids. I recycle, use public transportation when i can and refuse to give money to homeless people directly so that i don’t perpetuate their state of helplessness. i also vote, buy local produce and goods, and participate in local charities and fundraising races (tri, run, bike)
    Most pertinenet to this site…..I have also saved multiple friends from buying into a housing bubble by providing them with good economic evidence of why the local housing market is so overpriced and why it cannot sustain these prices.

  42. Posted by Punchy

    Has anyone actually gone inside this place? The site has some great photos, but Im new to the area and am not sure that the units are worth 650+ in that area of the city.

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