CATEGORY ARCHIVE: Bay Buildings

April 22, 2014

LinkedIn Snags An Entire San Francisco Tower To Call Their Own

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LinkedIn has reportedly agreed to lease the entire 26-story building rising at 222 Second Street, on the southwest corner of Second and Howard, according to Bloomberg. The 450,000-square-foot building which is being developed by Tishman Speyer is slated to be ready for occupancy in late 2017.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

April 17, 2014

Go Ahead, Make Your Day: SoMa Circa 1983

As a number of readers quickly noted, the McDonald's building on the corner of Third and Townsend which is on the market and primed for development was once transformed into the "Acorn Cafe," the cafe from which Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry character would order his daily coffee and from inside which he uttered his infamous line, "Go ahead, make my day" back in 1983.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | (email story)

April 16, 2014

Plans To Raze Market Street "Home" And Build 64 Apartments

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Plans to raze the shuttered Home restaurant at the Corner of Market and Church and construct a seven-story building designed by Arquitectonica with 64 apartments, 15 parking spaces, and 4,700 square feet of retail space on the ground floor have been submitted to Planning for review.

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Having sat vacant since 2011, Chipotle’s application to renovate and occupy the existing one-story building at 2100 Market Street was rejected by San Francisco’s Planning Commission last year. Brian Spiers Development, the developer behind "Linea" down the street at 1998 Market is leading the charge this time around.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (42) | (email story)

A's Pitch 10-Year Extension For The Oakland Coliseum

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The Oakland A's have proposed a 10-year lease extension for the Oakland Coliseum. The deal which could help keep the team in the East Bay until at least 2024 calls for $10-12 million in stadium improvements.

According to the Chronicle, the "most notable" improvements include a new electronic scoreboard and a ribbon scoreboard between the first and second decks. No word on proposed improvements to the Coliseum's plumbing and sewer system.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

April 14, 2014

Site Prep For Big Potrero Development And Park Is Underway

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Formerly known as Daggett Place or 1000 16th Street, permits for the 493-unit development to rise on the vacant lots bordered by 16th, 7th, and Hubbell Streets have been issued and site prep is now underway for "EQR Potrero" which is technically across 16th Street from Potrero Hill.

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The development includes 453 residential apartments (20 percent of which will be Below Market Rate), 39 commercial units (with over 10,000 square feet of pedestrian oriented retail space), and a one-acre urban park and public open space (click rendering to enlarge):

Daggett Park will include a dog walk, event lawn and soft play surfaces for kids and will be owned by the City of San Francisco but permanently maintained by EQR Potrero.

In terms of parking, there will be 307 spaces for cars and 470 bikes. And at the corner of 16th and 7th Streets, a "Flatiron" building will rise.

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Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (23) | (email story)

Cole Valley "Lange House" And Lot Sell For $3.15 Million

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Having been listed for $3.4 million, the sale of the nearly 3,000 square foot "Lange House" at the corner of Carl and Stanyan which was designed by August Nordin and built for family of dairy farmers whose cows once roamed around Haight-Ashbury has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $3,150,000, including the adjoining undeveloped lot fronting Stanyan Street.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | (email story)

April 11, 2014

Transbay Tower To Become "Salesforce Tower" With Monster Lease

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Salesforce.com will lease just over half of the 1,070-foot-tall Transbay Tower rising at 415 Mission Street, adding 714,000 square feet of space to their collective San Francisco "campus."

The 61-story building will be renamed "Salesforce Tower" and be ready for occupancy in 2017, at which point Salesforce will control over 2 million square feet of office space in the city.

"Salesforce Tower represents an incredible milestone in our company’s history—it will be the heart of our global headquarters in San Francisco," said Marc Benioff, the company chairman and CEO. "We founded salesforce.com in San Francisco 15 years ago and this expansion of our urban campus represents our commitment to growing in the city."

Salesforce is paying $560 million for its 15-1/2 year lease and naming rights, with plans to move into the tower in early 2018. Salesforce will effectively occupy the bottom 30 floors of the tower along with the very top floor.

Posted by socketadmin at 6:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (45) | (email story)

April 10, 2014

The Makeover And Return Of A Townsend Street Warehouse

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The former warehouse building on the southwest corner of Townsend and 2nd Streets is preparing for a makeover which will remove the non-historic elements from its façade (fire escapes, ducts and pipes), replace the windows, and repaint with a new color scheme.

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And if approved, a deck will be constructed on the roof, although the deck seems to have been rendered without the new building between 101 Townsend and the ballpark:

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The 43,500 square foot building is slated to be available for occupancy at the beginning of June and will return to the market in warm shell condition following the makeover.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

April 9, 2014

Plans Emerge For Conversion Of Potrero Hill Convalescent Home

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With the owner having retired and the convalescent home at 331 Pennsylvania Avenue having closed, plans to convert the historic three-story building which was constructed by the Bethlehem Steel Company in 1916 and first served as the Union Iron Works Hospital into six residential units have emerged.

As proposed, a two-story addition would be constructed behind the building and three private balconies would be added to the north. Five new off-street parking spaces would be accessed by way of garage door to be carved in the façade while a new rooftop deck and garden would sprout above.

The building's change in use will require authorization from the Planning Commission.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | (email story)

April 8, 2014

A Quick $500,000 Cut For The Postcard Row Home On The Corner

722 Steiner (www.SocketSite.com)

Having returned to the market three weeks ago listed for $4,000,000, a dollar more than the price at which it was listed in early 2010, the list price for the corner Postcard Row home at 722 Steiner Street has just been reduced by $500,000 (12 percent).

Posted by socketadmin at 9:45 AM | Permalink | (email story)

April 7, 2014

Unaffordable Housing Mark Hits $1.5 Million In San Francisco

The owner of the three-bedroom condo #22A at the Four Seasons Residences in San Francisco purchased the adjoining 836 square foot one-bedroom in October of 2008 and would like to merge the two units to create a 3,743 square foot four-bedroom home.

As the proposed merger will result in the loss of a legal dwelling unit, it needs to be approved by Planning. And in order to be approved without a formal hearing, the least expensive of the units to be merged would need to be deemed "demonstrably unaffordable or financially inaccessible housing."

While the one-bedroom recently appraised for $1,350,000, believe it or not, that's no longer considered to be demonstrably unaffordable or financially inaccessible housing in San Francisco. And as such, a formal hearing for the proposed merger will be held this week, a merger that the Planning Department recommends be denied.

Set at 80 percent of the combined land and structure values of single-family homes in San Francisco, the threshold for "demonstrably unaffordable and financially inaccessible housing" in the city is now $1,506,000, up from $1,342,000 nine months ago.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (35) | (email story)

April 4, 2014

Living Large At The Hermitage Atop Russian Hill

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The largest of seven condos within The Hermitage at 1020 Vallejo Street atop Russian Hill, the 3,100 square foot unit number two is configured with two bedroom suites, two balconies and two fireplaces (not to mention two side by side deeded parking spaces).

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The classic Esherick, Homsey, Dodge, and Davis design features generous proportions:

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And of course, big San Francisco views.

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∙ Listing: 1020 Vallejo Street #2 (2/2.5) 3,144 sqft - $5,399,000 [1020vallejo2com]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

April 3, 2014

An Unexpected Transbay Twist And Block Redesign

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With San Francisco’s Office of Community Investment and Infrastructure having determined that "economic conditions create a strong preference for commercial development over residential and hotel development" on Transbay Block 5, a request for proposals to build a 550-foot office tower with ground floor retail on the northeast corner of Howard and Beale has been issued.

Originally slated for a residential tower to rise up to 550 feet on the eastern portion of the block at the corner of Howard and Main, as we first noted yesterday, "unforeseen circumstances" have resulted in an unexpected configuration for the site and tower to rise.

The story behind the unforeseen circumstances which involves the driveway for 201 Mission Street (which runs through the middle of the block), the little Art Deco structure and open space on the corner of Howard and Beale (which is owned by 301 Howard across the street) and, of course, a concern about a potential loss of views:

The [Transbay Joint Powers Authority] attempted to negotiate an acquisition of the 201 Mission Street driveway in order to develop the site according to the standard configuration in the Development Controls – with the tower on the eastern portion of the block at the corner of Main and Howard Streets. However, the property owner expressed strong concerns that tenant views in 201 Mission Street would be negatively impacted by a tower on the eastern portion of Block 5 and demanded a price far in excess of the standard market value of the driveway parcel.
In addition, the driveway parcel provides the only access to 201 Mission Street’s parking and loading and therefore it would not be possible to develop the driveway without also negotiating a land swap with TJPA to provide alternate access. As a result, OCII does not expect the property owner of 201 Mission Street to submit a proposal in response to this RFP – and if that property owner did submit a proposal, it would need to conform to all of the restrictions described in this section.
Because of the time spent negotiating an acquisition of the 201 Mission Street driveway and the need to issue the RFP, neither OCII nor TJPA has had discussions with the owner of 301 Howard Street regarding its parcel.

That being said, while a proposal which includes either the parcel owned by 201 Mission Street or the parcel owned by 301 Howard Street will not be considered, once a development team is selected, the OCII is open to exploring alternatives for the open space on the corner of Howard and Beale, "in cooperation with the property owner." Proposals are due at the end of June.

An upside to the unforeseen circumstances, a 10,000-square-foot open space on the corner of Howard and Main is now part of the Block 5 plan as well.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

March 31, 2014

More Mass In The Mission: Designs For 20 Modern Condos On 24th

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A plan to raze La Parrilla Grill's two-story Mission District building on the southeast corner of Folsom and 24th Streets and construct a five-story building designed by Natoma Architects with 20 modern condos over 2,800 square feet of new ground floor commercial space has been submitted to Planning for review.

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As proposed, a central courtyard would divide the top four floors of the building into two separate masses, but the façade along 24th Street would rise a continuous 55 feet.

A few of the Planning Department's preliminary thoughts with respect to the project's fit:

Although the proposed project is a significant mass increase in comparison to the surrounding buildings, the overall massing, site design, and open space on balance offers the scale and density appropriate to a block termination and nearby public transportation, including MUNI and BART.
However, to further increase its relationship to the character of the block, [the Urban Design Assistance Team] recommends removing the wall on the south side of the courtyard towards the inner portion of the block to align the courtyard and create an extension of the midblock open space.

And with respect to the building's frontage along the street:

While UDAT appreciates the introduction of the arcade element to further define the relationship between the sidewalk and interior retail space, the arcade is out of character with its commercial context as currently designed as the heights of the openings are taller than surrounding facades, the narrow width is not useful public space, and the consistency of the column bays do not accentuate the retail or lobby entrances.
UDAT recommends changing the proportions of the ground floor expression to be more in line with the neighborhood scale in height, changing the bay depth or width or adding elements to emphasize entrances, and offering a more generous lobby space. The arcade should either be narrower to create a deep commercial façade or wider to be a functional and programmed transition to the retail and lobby.

A garage for ten cars via triple car stackers would be located along Lucky Street.

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Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (40) | (email story)

The Warriors Island Arena And Aptly Named Watermark

Of the six key design issues for the proposed Warriors arena upon San Francisco’s Piers 30-32, how the proposed public access areas of the development will perform under the latest estimates for sea level rise and a 100-year flood is number six.

While we’re happy to report that the public access areas of the proposed arena should be just fine based on the latest estimates for sea rise and flooding, they could end up being on an island for a bit. And it's looking a little wet for the aptly named Watermark at 501 Beale and Portside down the street (click image to enlarge).

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

March 28, 2014

Plans To Convert Mission Armory From Porn Studio To Office Use

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Peter Acworth has quietly drafted plans to convert Kink.com's Armory building at Mission and 14th Streets from fetish porn studio to "traditional office use," with the 39,000 square foot Drill Court proposed for "spectator sports, arts, or nighttime entertainment."

San Francisco Armory Drill Court

If approved, the conversion would yield over 140,000 square feet of office space, including 67,000 square feet in the basement of the Armory which is currently used to film the "Arts."

Acworth purchased the Armory for $14.5 million in 2007, at which time a number of plans to convert the building to condos and commercial space had been proposed and rejected.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

Don Fisher Clubhouse Design Refined, Rising In Hayes Valley

The design by TEF Architecture has been refined and construction is well underway on the four-story "Don Fisher Clubhouse" rising for the Boys & Girls Club of San Francisco which will be moving from their current space at 1950 Page Street in the Haight to 380 Fulton Street in Hayes Valley, a former Central Freeway parcel.

The new 38,000 square foot building, which includes a pool, gymnasium and plenty of other rooms for games, arts, and education, is slated to open at the beginning of 2015.

As we first reported last week, the Falun Gong has purchased the old Clubhouse on Page.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

Cathedral Hill Demolition: Feasting On The Remnants Of The Rooms

The heavy machinery is feasting on the remnants of the guest rooms, the office portion of the old Jack Tar Hotel has been stripped to its superstructure, and the city block should soon be completed razed in order to make room for CPMC's Cathedral Hill Hospital to rise.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

March 27, 2014

A Major Price Cut For Minor's Massive San Francisco Estate

3800 Washington

The list price for Halsey Minor's 18,000 square foot Presidio Heights mansion at 3800 Washington Street has just been cut by $1,994,000 (10%). Now asking $17,995,000 for the mansion, adjacent 2,600 square foot guest house, and the undeveloped lot behind.

Le Petit Trianon (Image Source: lepetittrianon.com)

Having topped the list of the Top 500 Delinquent Taxpayers in California last year, Mr. Minor soon thereafter filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, listing liabilities of $50 million to $100 million and assets of $10 million to $50 million.

Minor purchased the asset turned liability at 3800 Washington for $20,000,000 in 2007.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

March 26, 2014

Before And After On The 25th Floor Of The St. Regis

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Purchased for $1,930,000 in January of 2013 having traded for $2,100,000 in July of 2008, the 1,527 square foot St. Regis condo #25F has since been completely remodeled.

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And the wall between the living room and second bedroom has been removed to open up the space, replaced with a sliding pocket wall for when a second bedroom is needed:

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The kitchen before:

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The kitchen after:

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And the new master bath:

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∙ Listing: 188 Minna #25F (2/2.5) 1,527 sqft - $3,850,000 [stregis25f.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

March 25, 2014

Nob Hill Church Ready To Meet Its Maker For Condos To Rise

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With the Nob Hill Neighbors' appeal to block the development of 1601 Larkin Street denied, the demolition permit reinstated and historic artifacts removed, the dilapidated First St. John's United Methodist Church at the corner of Larkin and Clay is getting ready to meet its maker, clearing the way for a five-floor building with 27 condos to rise:

It has been a decade since the development of the Larkin Street corner was first proposed.

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

March 24, 2014

Purchased For 37 Percent Less, Listed For 74 Percent More

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The 475-square-foot "junior one bedroom" condo #629 at 177 Townsend Street was purchased for $466,000 in August of 2007. It resold for $295,000 in November of 2011.

With "over 35K" since invested in the unit, including new floors and refinished cabinetry, the South Beach condo with parking is back on the market and listed for $550,000.

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Call it a 37 percent decline in value for the condo from 2007 to 2011, and a 74 percent gain in value for the condo from 2011 to 2014 if it sells at asking, a gain which would include both market appreciation as well as the investment in - and returns from - remodeling.

∙ Listing: 177 Townsend Street #629 (0/1) 475 sqft - $550,000 [Redfin]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | (email story)

March 21, 2014

SFUSD Snubs Recommendation To Act On Surplus Property

As we first reported five months ago, concerned that surplus and underutilized real estate owned by San Francisco's City and County agencies could be put to better use ("providing for housing or commercial, cultural, and/or civic activities") and increase the City’s tax base, a Civil Grand Jury came up with six findings and recommendations for the City.

The Grand Jury's Finding Number 4:

Current practice allows City Departments and [the San Francisco Unified School District] to keep property on their surplus list indefinitely without any consequence. The concern for a more rational approach to handling under-utilized or surplus property requires that a time limit be imposed on how long property may remain on these lists. If, after a pre-determined period, property which is identified as surplus or underutilized has not been put into use or fully-utilized or no plans have been adopted for its use or full-utilization, there should be specified consequences for the failure to act.

The Grand Jury’s Recommendation Number 4:

The Board of Supervisors and the SF Board of Education should each adopt rules which limit the length of time property may remain on their respective surplus list without action and which address consequences for such inaction.

The Board of Education's initial response to Recommendation Number 4: "The recommendation will not be implemented because it is not warranted or reasonable." And the six-month update from San Francisco Unified School District as San Francisco's current housing crisis grows: "There is no further update or change to this original response."

A Grand Jury's Call To Optimize San Francisco's City-Owned Real Estate [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

March 18, 2014

Postcard Row Home Survives Another Threat, Back On The Market

722 Steiner (www.SocketSite.com)

San Francisco's Postcard Row was developed by Matthew Kavanaugh between 1892 and 1896, with the first house in the row at Steiner and Grove the developer’s own home.

Having survived the Great Quake, the 4,700-square-foot Victorian at 722 Steiner Street was slated for demolition in the 1970's but survived that threat as well and was restored.

Listed for sale in early 2010 asking $3,999,999, the property was reduced and relisted a number of times. Last listed for $2,950,000 at the end of 2010 and noting "Seller MUST sell, will consider all offers," the property was withdrawn from the market without a sale.

In default since early 2011 on a $1,740,000 mortgage from 2007 (hence the "Seller MUST sell, will consider all offers" at the end of 2010), the owner of 722 Steiner has survived three scheduled foreclosure auctions over the past three years, either by way of mutual agreement or bankruptcy filings.

And today, 722 Steiner Street is back on the market and listed for $4,000,000.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

Falun Gong Buys Boys & Girls Club Building On Page For $6.9M

1950 Page

According to a plugged-in tipster, members of the Falun Gong have just paid $6.9 million for the Boys & Girls Club building at 1950 Page Street. The 32,000 square foot recreation center is one block from Haight Street and a building away from Golden Gate Park.

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As we first reported last year, the property is zoned for residential development up to 40 feet in height, roughly 10 feet higher than the existing building, and exploratory drawings had been drafted for a four-story building with up to 59 condos to rise on the site.

No word on whether the Falun Gong has any plans to redevelop the site or will keep the gym, pool and clubhouse space in place as a center for members of the movement.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

March 14, 2014

Et Tu, Caesar's? Plans For New Condos On The Edge Of North Beach

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While the project has yet to be approved, plans have drawn to raze the former Caesar's Restaurant on the southwest corner of Bay and Powell and construct a four-story building with 17 condos, a new ground floor restaurant, and underground parking in its place:

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From the architects: "On the edge of North Beach this building’s design is a response to the heavily trafficked Bay Street. The glass façade ripples and shimmers in a dynamic way and stands in contrast to the heavy masonry buildings surrounding it."

Posted by socketadmin at 7:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

Urban Putt Shooting For April Opening, But Likely Without Liquor

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Having raised $53,883 on Kickstarter to fund their final (dog) leg of construction of a mini-golf course within the former mortuary space at 1096 South Van Ness Avenue, Urban Putt is now shooting for an opening on Friday, April 18. But Urban Putt will likely have to open without a liquor license in hand.

Not too coincidently, Supervisor Campos has just introduced a bit of custom-tailored legislation which would amend the Mission Alcoholic Beverage Special Use District, "to allow mini-golf courses functionally and/or physically integrated with a restaurant use to obtain liquor licenses."

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

March 13, 2014

A Drone's Eye View Of The Mission Bay Blaze Destruction

Piloting a drone with a GoPro attached, Ross Barringer captures an aerial view of the damage the Mission Bay 360 blaze wreaked upon the building at Fourth and China Basin.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

March 11, 2014

Mission Bay 360 Building Is On Fire, Quite Literally

Half of BRE Properties' Mission Bay 360 project under construction at Fourth and China Basin has been on fire since 5pm with firefighters trying to contain the five-alarm fire to the 170-unit building on Mission Bay Block 5 which is expected to be a complete loss.

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The second-half of the of the Mission Bay 360 development with 190 units on Mission Bay Block 11 appears to have been spared.

Posted by socketadmin at 6:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

Potrero Hill Compound Sells For $3.9 Million

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Listed for $5,995,000 last June, reduced to $4,995,000 in September, and then cut to $4,350,000 in November, the sale of the 6,645 square foot former art school building at 2255 Mariposa Street and Utah which was remodeled and converted to legal dwelling units in 1987 has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $3,900,000.

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From a plugged-in reader's rather rough assessment of the property late last year, keep in mind that the compound sits upon a 12,500 square foot parcel of bedrock:

This is at best a teardown. Rotted beams, rusted staircases and at least $500-750,000 to put in a garage!!!
All systems are either out of code, unknown or 40+ years old.
You need to walk up three to six flights a day depending on what floor you need to collapse on, and whisper was it wasn't ready for an earthquake.
It would cost $2-3m to make this liveable, and at least two to three years of permits and pain. Even if you paid $2m you would at best breakeven after sacrificing years of your life to a project that sites next to a wave of never ending smog.

We'll let you know when the plans have been drawn and the permits are requested.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

March 6, 2014

KRON-TV’s 1001 Van Ness Building On The Market

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With KRON-TV planning to vacate its 107,000 square foot building at Van Ness and O'Farrell and sublet space from KGO, a move which is expected by the end of the year, KRON's parent company has placed 1001 Van Ness Avenue on the market.

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In addition to marketing the four-story building as ideal for a "tech-office conversion" or medical office redevelopment, the property is also being positioned as an "opportunity to entitle and build over 200 units in one of the nation’s premier residential development markets," the conceptual renderings for which a plugged-in tipster delivers:

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The parcel is zoned for development up to 130 feet in height.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

March 4, 2014

Rebuilding Of Bay Bridge Ramps To The Islands Ready To Roll

The rebuilding of the access ramps from the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge to Yerba Buena and Treasure Island is set to commence on Friday.

Phase one of the Yerba Buena Island I-80 Interchange Improvement Project will construct new westbound on and off ramps to the new eastern span of the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge (click renderings to enlarge).

Once the ramps are in place on the east side of Yerba Buena Island, which is slated for mid-2016, the existing ramps on the west side of the island will be retrofitted or replaced.

No update on the redevelopment of Treasure Island and plans for 240,000 square feet of new commercial space, 8,000 new residences, and over 300 acres of open space, the ground for which was to be broken this year but the financing for which fell through.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

February 28, 2014

Cathedral Hill Demolition Watch: No Rooms At The Inn, Offices Next

Our plugged-in photographer reports the old Jack Tar Hotel's event spaces, garage and hotel rooms have mostly been razed and the wrecking crew is staring to work on the remaining office section of the block (click photo to enlarge).

As the Cathedral Hill site looked last month and two months before that. And of course, the rendering for CPMC's Cathedral Hill Hospital that's going to rise on the site.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

February 27, 2014

Agents Take Next Step Toward Razing The Elbo Room

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As we first reported last month, the owners of 645 Valencia Street which is currently leased to the Elbo Room have filed preliminary plans to raze the Mission district building and construct a five-story condominium development in its place.

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While some felt our initial report overstated the seriousness of the plans and owners' intentions, our report was actually understated. As we outlined the following week:

A detailed set of architectural plans has been drafted for the project and the building’s owners have authorized the architects to act as their agents in submitting applications for environmental reviews, a historic resource evaluation, variances and Conditional Use. That's every step required to get the project formally approved.
In fact, a month after the Planning Department provided their feedback on the preliminary plans, the application fee for which was nearly $5,000 alone, a follow-up meeting was scheduled between the Planning Department and architects to discuss next steps and plans for submitting the Environmental Evaluation and Historic Resource report for the project to move forward.

While it has yet to be assigned within the Planning Department, the application for Environmental Evaluation has been submitted for the development, a geotechnical report has been completed for the site, and a Historic Resource Evaluation form has been signed with planning for a full Historic Resource Evaluation Report underway.

Once again, while it's possible that the building's owners will abandon their plans at any stage, the extent of work, forward progress and expense to date would suggest that this is more than simply an exploratory exercise, as some have suggested and (been) played.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

February 26, 2014

Condos Rather Than Cold Ones On Divisadero Street

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A proposal to add four floors of residential space over the existing two-story garage at 834 Divisadero Street is making its way through Planning (click rendering to enlarge).

Designed by Ian Birchall & Associates, the proposed development would rise 65 feet in height and create seven condos across the top four floors, seven parking spaces on the second, and 4,000 square feet of ground floor retail space along the street.

And yes, this is Little Star adjacent building between McAllister and Fulton into which some were expecting Barrel Head Brew House to go.

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February 24, 2014

Another Proposed Conversion On O'Farrell Street

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Plans to convert the five-story building at 436 O’Farrell Street from office space into nine residential units have been drawn and the required variances for the project will be decided this week, with a new roof deck proposed in lieu of a required rear yard.

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No word on whether or not the psychic who replaced A-One’s operation saw this coming or has predicted what will happen with the plans to raze the Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist building two doors away and construct a twelve-story building in its place.

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February 19, 2014

The Lange House (And Lot) Hits The Market In Cole Valley

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If you’ve ever coveted the large Cole Valley Victorian at the corner of Carl and Stanyan, now's your chance to act, or at the very least to take a peek inside.

Designed by Swedish architect August Nordin and constructed in 1912, the house at 199 Carl was built for the Lange family who were dairy farmers in the Haight-Ashbury.

With four floors of living space, parking for three cars, and a potentially sub-dividable lot along Stanyan Street, the property is now on the market and listed for $3,400,000.

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High-Rise Wars: New Tower Appealed By Neighboring High-Rise HOA

340 Fremont Site

As we first reported this past December, while the demolition permits to raze the buildings at 340 and 360 Fremont Street in order to clear the way for the approved 40-story residential tower to rise on the site were issued, the permit to build the tower was appealed and suspended. And now, the approved demolition permits have been appealed as well.

The appellant behind all of the appeals is the HOA for The Metropolitan, the adjacent two-towered development along First Street which rises up to 27-stories with Bay views, views which will be blocked by the 340 Fremont Street tower as noted back in 2006.

San Francisco's Board of Appeals is slated to hear the HOA's arguments this evening.

UPDATE: The appeals were denied and the demolition of the existing buildings at 340 and 360 Fremont should soon commence with construction for the 400-foot tower to follow.

Demo Approved But Permit To Build 40-Story Tower Suspended [SocketSite]
Neighborhood Scoop: 340 Fremont's Refined Design And Parking [SocketSite]

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February 7, 2014

Plans To Raze The Elbo Room Are More Than Preliminary

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As we first reported last week, the owners of the Valencia Street building which is currently leased to the Elbo Room have filed their preliminary plans to raze the Mission district building and construct a five-story condo building in its place.

While some felt our report overstated the intent and seriousness of the plans, including Matt Shapiro, the operator of the Elbo Room, who dismissively posted that the Elbo Room wasn’t closing "any time soon" and that the owners of the building weren't serious about acting on the plans, our report was actually understated.

A detailed set of architectural plans has been drafted for the project and the building’s owners have authorized the architects to act as their agents in submitting applications for environmental reviews, a historic resource evaluation, variances and Conditional Use. That's every step required to get the project formally approved.

In fact, a month after the Planning Department provided their feedback on the preliminary plans, the application fee for which was nearly $5,000 alone, a follow-up meeting was scheduled between the Planning Department and architects to discuss next steps and plans for submitting the Environmental Evaluation and Historic Resource report for the project to move forward.

Our report isn't based on hearsay, a carefully worded statement or conjecture, but rather actual documents of which we have copies in hand. And yes, we have the preliminary designs for the proposed five-story building to replace the Elbo Room as well:

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We don’t know if Mr. Shapiro is simply out of the loop or trying to cover up the extent of planning for the project that has been happening behind the scenes. And while it is, of course, entirely possible that the building’s owners abandon their plans at any stage, the extent of work, forward progress and expense to date would suggest that this is more than simply an exploratory exercise.

Elbo Room At Risk Of Being Razed For Mission Housing Development [SocketSite]

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February 4, 2014

From Long-Vacant Building To Affordable Housing In The Haight

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Having sat empty for the past ten years, an ordinance to allow Mercy Housing to convert the vacant four-story Single Room Occupancy (SRO) building on the northwest corner of Page and Masonic to 16 units of affordable housing is slated to be passed by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors this afternoon.

The building at 1500 Page was approved for use as an SRO for formerly homeless adults back in 2009, but that project was abandoned. The current plan is to convert the building's 38 rooms into 16 self-contained studios for developmentally disabled adults who qualify as Lower or Very Low Income Households and a one-bedroom for an on-site manager.

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February 3, 2014

Presidio Trust Rejects All Three Proposals For Mid-Crissy Field Site

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Having reviewed the final three proposals for redeveloping the Presidio’s Mid-Crissy Field site last week, proposals which were revised at the request of the Presidio Trust late last year, the Trust has decided not to pursue any of the proposed projects.

As we first reported in December, the National Park Service was "strongly recommending" that the Trust defer any decision for several years to allow the Crissy Field site and current home to Sports Basement to develop "in a more comprehensive, thoughtful, integrated, and planned manner."

While now noting that they "do not believe any of the projects [are] right for this location," the Trust plans to continue discussions with each of the teams to bring elements of their programs to the Presidio and is "extending an invitation to George Lucas to work with [the Trust] to identify an alternative location for his proposed museum within the Presidio."

Lucas had intimated that his art collection and dollars for the proposed Lucas Cultural Arts Museum would head to Chicago if his proposal wasn't selected for the Crissy Field site.

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Concordia-Argonaut Club Building On The Market, Going Condo?

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The Concordia-Argonaut Club has put their 52,000 square foot building at 1142 Van Ness Avenue on the market for $21.5 million. Built for the Concordia Club's members in 1909, the Jewish men's club merged with the Argonaut Club in 1939.

With a current membership of 350, a sale would allow the club to cash out and move into a smaller space. That being said, the club Board's preference is to find a hotel or condo developer willing to carve out a space for the club in the existing building.

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January 31, 2014

Elbo Room At Risk Of Being Razed For Mission Housing Development

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The owners of the two-story Mission district building at the corner of Valencia and Sycamore which is currently occupied by the Elbo Room have quietly drafted plans to raze the bar and construct a new five-story building in its place.

Early plans for the development include nine (9) residential units, three one-bedrooms and six two-bedrooms, ranging in size from 500 to 1,000 square feet over a 770 square-foot commercial space and parking for six (6) cars on the ground floor.

While the existing building at 645 Valencia Street wasn’t deemed to be historic when reviewed as part of the Inner Mission Historic Resource Survey in 2011, the Planning Department has since "received additional information that suggests that the subject property may have associations with the history of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) individuals in San Francisco."

As such, the owners will be required to provide a Historic Resource Evaluation (HRE) to determine whether the subject property is a historic resource for the purposes of CEQA in order to move forward with any development.

UPDATE: While some might wish it were, and others seem to be implying that it is, our report isn't based on rumor or speculation but rather the Preliminary Project Assessment for the development which was submitted to San Francisco’s Planning Department for review. The first page and a quarter of the Planning Department’s response to the application, click to enlarge:

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January 30, 2014

Nob Hill Neighbors' Appeal Denied, Development Clear To Commence

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

A plugged-in tipster reports that the Nob Hill Neighbors’ appeal to block the development of 1601 Larkin Street was denied by a vote of 4-0 last night, clearing the way for the demolition the dilapidated First St. John's United Methodist Church at the corner of Larkin and Clay and the construction of a five-floor building with 27 dwelling units on the site.

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January 29, 2014

Jimbo’s Bop City Building Unanimously Approved For Landmark Status

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Moved from Post to Fillmore Street as part of the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency’s plan to redevelop the Western Addition, 1712-1716 Fillmore Street is set to become San Francisco’s 266th Historic Landmark.

Unanimously approved by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors yesterday, the building which once housed Jimbo’s Bop City - the place to play as a Jazz artist from 1950 to 1965, with the likes of Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Dinah Washington, and John Coltrane having graced the stage which was open until 6am - is a ceremonial second Board vote and the Mayor’s signature away from landmark status.

Marcus Books, the nation’s oldest continuously operating and independent Black-owned and Black-themed bookstore, moved into the ground floor of the building in 1980.

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January 28, 2014

Six Months Later And Ninety-One Grand More? Nein, A Little Less

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Purchased as new for $1,160,000 in 2008, the 1,146 square foot southeast corner condo on the 18th floor of the 22-story SOMA Grand resold for $1,198,000 a year ago next month.
Six months later, the two-bedroom hit the market listed for $1,289,000, a price which was reduced to $1,199,000 two months ago.

Yesterday, the sale of 1160 Mission Street #1806 between 7th and 8th Streets (“in the heart of SOMA's Tech Belt”) closed escrow with a reported contract price of $1,175,000, fifteen grand more than in early 2008 but twenty-three grand less than a year ago.

While the condition of the condo was "apples-to-apples" with respect to the sales, keep in mind that the SOMA Grand's homeowners association filed suit against the building’s developer, builder, and architects eight months ago, a fact that can affect financing and limit the pool of potential buyers.

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January 27, 2014

Proposed Presidio Projects Photo Simulated, Ready For Review

With the Presidio Trust Board of Directors set to publicly review the three revised proposals for developing the Presidio's Mid-Crissy Field site tonight, photo simulations to compare the mass and height for each of the projects have been prepared with the existing Sports Basement/Commissary building in place for the sake of comparison.

The simulation for "Scheme 1" of the proposed Lucas Culural Arts Museum which would rise 61 feet to the top of its parapet, 66 feet to the top of its dome (click images to enlarge):

The simulation for "Scheme 2" of the Lucas Culural Arts Museum which would rise 45 feet to the top of its parapet, 50 feet to the top of its atrium skylight:

The simulation for the Presidio Exchange project which would rise 43 feet to the top of its building:

The simulation for the Bridge/Sustainability Institute project which would rise 43 feet to the top of its building:

Additional angles for the photo simulations are available in the Mid-Crissy Field Project photo simulation supplement.

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January 24, 2014

Approved Nob Hill Development Appealed By The Neighbors

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

Having been rejected twice, once in 2010 and again at the end of 2012, the proposed demolition the dilapidated First St. John's United Methodist Church at the corner of Larkin and Clay and the construction of a five-floor building with 27 dwelling units on the parcel was unanimously approved by San Francisco’s Planning Commission late last year.

Next week, San Francisco’s Board of Appeals will hear the Nob Hill Neighbors' protest, a challenge of the zoning variances which were granted for the project, and without which the 1601 Larking Street project as approved cannot be built.

1601 Larkin Street 3.1: The Redesign Details And Renderings [SocketSite]
Larkin Street Redevelopment Take Three And Planning's Flop [SocketSite]

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Plans For Nine-Story Polk Gulch Building To Replace G&R Paint Store

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The owner of the one-story G&R Paint Company building and business at 1238 Sutter Street appears to be preparing to jump into the development game with plans to raze the existing Polk Gulch building and construct a 9-story, mixed-use building on the site which fronts Sutter and Fern Streets between Polk and Van Ness Avenue:

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As proposed, the nine-story building would include up to 40 dwelling units, 6 parking spaces for cars and 35 for bikes, and 2,550 square feet of commercial space fronting Sutter Street.

And while zoned for development up to 130 feet, as are the parcels on either side of the lot, the proposed building at 1238 Sutter Street would only rise 88 feet in height.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

January 23, 2014

Market Street Site Zoned For 400-Foot Tower In Play

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Sitting on a prime corner parcel that was partially up-zoned for development up to 400 feet in height as part of San Francisco's Market & Octavia Plan, the Boas family is preparing to sell the two-story Honda dealership at the intersection of Market and South Van Ness Ave.

The potential 400-foot tower would be built on the southern portion of the triangular parcel with the Market Street frontage rising up to 120 feet in height. As the parcel's development was envisioned by Brand + Allen back in 2007:

10 South Van Ness Massing (Image Source: brandallen.com)

An estimated 500 to 700 housing units could be built on the site.

San Francisco’s Market & Octavia Neighborhood Plan Moves Forward [SocketSite]
Market Street Honda dealership site revs up for housing [Business Times]

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The $350 Million Plans For Expanding San Francisco’s Moscone Center

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With the total number of annual attendees at events held at the Moscone Center’s North and South buildings – San Francisco’s primary convention, exhibition, and meeting facility – having dropped 20 percent since 2010, a proposed expansion of the Center’s North and South buildings by 20 percent is making its way through Planning.

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The plans, timing, and another rendering of the proposed expansion project for San Francisco’s Moscone Center on Howard between Third and Fourth Streets:

The proposed Moscone Center Expansion Project would increase the gross square footage of the Moscone Center facility by about 20 percent, from approximately 1.2 million square feet to 1.5 million square feet.
Through the expansion, as well as through renovation and repurposing of the existing facility, the project would result in an approximately 42 percent increase in functional space, to about 888,300 square feet from 625,600 square feet, as well as reconfigured support space.

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New construction would be primarily above grade both north and south of Howard Street in buildings up to approximately 95 feet tall. At completion, the expanded Moscone North structure would be approximately 54 feet in height and the Moscone South structure would be approximately 95 feet in height.

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Additional space would be created by excavating in two locations under Howard Street and expanding the existing below‐grade exhibition halls that connect the Moscone North and South buildings. The proposed project would create a total of approximately 580,000 square feet of contiguous exhibition space below ground.
The proposed project would also reconfigure the existing adjacent bus pick‐up and drop off facilities and create two pedestrian bridges spanning Howard Street, which would connect Moscone North and South expansions at the second level above grade.

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A joint project between the Moscone Expansion District, the San Francisco Tourism Improvement District Management Corporation, and the City and County of San Francisco’s Convention Facilities Department, assuming the plans are approved, construction on the Moscone Center Expansion Project is slated to begin this November and be completed approximately 44 months later at an anticipated cost of $350 million.

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January 17, 2014

The 61-Story Vertical Campus Rising At 415 Mission Street

San Francisco’s Transbay Tower has shed its early 101 First Street address in favor of 415 Mission Street and is being positioned as a "vertical campus" with 61 floors of flexible floor plans designed to "attract genius," a positioning at least one reader can't help but think is ingeniously designed to attract one tenant in particular.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (39) | (email story)

January 16, 2014

Designs For Mid-Market Building To Replace Den Of Adult Activities

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The design for the proposed 8-story building to replace the adults-only Market Street Cinema incorporates boxed windows spanning multiple floors to create strong vertical lines across its Market Street façade and materials to match the context of the street.

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The Planning Department's reaction to the preliminary design and a peek at the building’s proposed Stevenson Street façade which is a bit more dynamic:

The Planning Department agrees in principle with the project architect’s analysis and objectives of contextual response, and urges adding some of the energy and dynamism of the Stevenson façade into the Market Street expression while retaining the references to the context.
At the same time the Planning Department urges a stronger and more clearly defined base, middle, and top. The offset columnation of the façade to create a base, middle, and top may need to be augmented to give a deeper mottled and textured façade. The Planning Department recommends incorporating stronger horizontal architectural differentiation between the ground floor and second story levels, and at the roof termination. Consider using architectural detailing, such as a belt course or cornice, at the ground floor ceiling height to help frame the pedestrian space of the sidewalk.
The function of the thin ’brise-soleils’ are unclear, and may need further clarification. Any element on Market Street should be given some heft.
The Planning Department recommends more be done to modulate and articulate the façade at the intermediate scale. A building on Market that neighbors other buildings of stature should incorporate materials that relate to the scale or relate to other historic qualities that impart texture or craft of detail or material. Consider creating an intermediate scale by using window groupings, with deep reveals, intermediate spandrels, and further subdivision of windows by mullions.

The aforementioned Stevenson Street façade which includes the entrance to the development's proposed condos, parking garage, and bar:

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Plans For Condos To Replace Prominent Mid-Market Porn Complex [SocketSite]

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January 15, 2014

Mid-Market Rent Reductions: NEMA Drops A Few Dollars

When NEMA first started pre-leasing its North Tower units at Market and Tenth in early December, studios were priced starting at $2,575 per month for a 463-square-foot unit while one-bedrooms were priced starting from $3,450 per month for 691 square feet.

As of this morning, 486-square-foot one bedrooms in the North Tower are now available starting at $2,510 while a 752-square-foot one-bedroom can be had for $3,403 per month on the ninth floor.

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January 14, 2014

Plans For Condos To Replace Prominent Mid-Market Porn Complex

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Having drafted plans to raze the Market Street Cinema at 1075 Market Street and construct an 8-story building the site of the former "adult entertainment complex," the San Francisco-based Encore Housing Opportunity Fund is in contract to buy the site from Harry Mohney and the Forbes family according to the Business Times.

The preliminary plans for the Mid-Market development include between 90 and 99 condos over 7,500 square feet of street-level retail and 24 parking spaces on the parcel which is zoned for buildings up to 90 feet in height. The units would be a mix of studios, one-bedrooms, and two's catering to the "creative, bike-centric workers filling office buildings in the neighborhood."

While the demolition of movie theaters in San Francisco is regulated and restricted, the controls do not apply to "Adult Theaters." As such, the Planning Department has requested "evidence to clarify the history of this property as it relates to theater and/or adult entertainment uses," perhaps a few select pictures or the like.

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January 13, 2014

Historic Potrero Hill Convalescent Home Probably Going Condo

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With the owner retiring, the 42-bed Mission Bay Convalescent Hospital at 331 Pennsylvania Avenue will be shuttered on February 24 and the historic Potrero Hill property will be sold.

While a buyer has yet to be identified, according to The Potrero View and the broker handling the sale, it's "probably condos" in the works.

Designed by Frederick H. Meyer, the three-story concrete building was constructed by the Bethlehem Steel Company in 1916 and first served as the Union Iron Works Hospital.

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January 9, 2014

The Landmark Loophole And Plan To Convert The SF Design Center

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A plan to convert over two-thirds of the San Francisco Design Center at 2 Henry Adams Street from designer showroom space to general office use is in the works, a use which is currently disallowed as the 330,000 square foot building is zoned for Production, Distribution & Repair (PDR).

While the planned conversion flies in the face of a key objective of San Francisco's recently adopted Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan, a plan which actively seeks to preserve the supply of PDR space within the district and city, there is a landmark loophole.

As we first reported last year, another key objective of the Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan is to ensure the economic viability of historically significant buildings, providing an exception for the conversion of such buildings to office use. And as such, the owners of 2 Henry Adams were planning to seek a Landmark Designation for the building which would clear the way for its conversion.

The owners of 2 Henry Adams have since formally filed their request to initiate a landmark designation for the building which was built for the Dunham, Carrigan & Hayden Company in 1915 and served as the corporate offices, warehouse and distribution facility for the company, a wholesale steel and hardware importer/distributor.

Next week, San Francisco’s Historic Preservation Commission is slated to consider the request to landmark the building with a preliminary recommendation to initiate the designation.

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Tenants In Illegally Converted Mid-Market Building Suing To Stay

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With the City having suspended their previously issued building permit for the conversion of 1049 Market Street from its current non-compliant residential use back to office space in order "to enable the City to obtain additional details about the building's historic and current occupancies," eleven of the remaining tenants in the building who have defied their eviction notices are now suing the landlord, alleging harassment.

The tenants who pay "around $700 for compact loft-style units with kitchenettes and shared bathrooms" in the Mid-Market building are calling for the landlord to allow them to stay. The owners, who haven't budged, are slated to meet with city officials again next month.

Conversion Of Illegal Mid-Market Apartment Building Suspended [SocketSite]
Mid-Market tenants sue landlord, alleging harassment [SFGate]

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January 7, 2014

A Giant Elk Paid $5,550,000 For The Noe Valley Firehouse No. 44

3816 22nd Street (www.SocketSite.com)

Briefly on the market for $5,250,000 this past September, the converted Noe Valley Firehouse at 3816 22nd Street quickly sold for $5,550,000 or $955 per square foot and the buyer was an extinct giant elk.

Okay, so the buyer wasn't actually an extinct giant elk but rather the "Megaloceros, LLC," behind which the identity of the person financing the purchase was hidden. And while we're not going to name the veiled buyer, we will note that he is a tech entrepreneur but didn't make his money in any IPO, but rather by selling his startups to larger companies, none of which included Facebook, Twitter, Zynga, Google nor Apple.

Having first hit the market in 2008 with a price tag of $6,375,000, the seller of Firehouse 44 paid $4,050,000 for the property in 2011 and appears to have remodeled a bit, but not much, between.

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Cathedral Hill Demolition Watch And Pictorial Progress Report

Having been chipping away at the back of the old Jack Tar/Cathedral Hill Hotel, bulldozing the interior, and stripping the facade from the southern portion of the building, a plugged-in tipster reports the demolition of the hotel has entered a new phase with the superstructure now being jack hammered away in order to make room for CPMC’s Cathedral Hill Medical Center to rise.

As the hotel looked two months ago (click any of the images to enlarge):

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Rezoning A Landmark To Enable Development Elsewhere

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Sitting on a Mid-Market parcel which is zoned for building up to 120 feet in height, a reader worries that a zoning change in the works for 133-135 Golden Gate Avenue upon which the St. Boniface Church and Rectory sits could be a precursor to plans for razing the landmark church in order to make way for more "cookie cutter condos."

Fear not Landmark lovers nor proponents of density either, the proposed zoning change for the St. Boniface Church and Rectory site is simply intended to allow the church to sell off the development rights associated with the parcel's potential, allowing another site in the San Francisco to be developed with greater density but not any additional height, per se.

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December 27, 2013

Plans For 12-Story Building Could Transform A Tenderloin Block

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Having been banned from the church for being disruptive, a protester has been stationed outside the Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist’s building at 450 O'Farrell Street on a near daily basis for over a year, accusing the Church of having turned a blind eye to the boarded-up property it owns next door, "leaving hard drugs, blight, and homelessness to dominate its state" and surroundings.

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Perhaps due in part to the protesting, but more likely driven by the Mid-Market boom which is spilling over into the Tenderloin, the Fifth Church of Christ, Scientist has quietly drawn up plans to raze its columned church and adjacent boarded-up storefronts and construct a twelve-story building in their place, rising 130 feet with 97 individual dwelling units and 74 group housing units over a new 10,000-square-foot church, 6,000 square feet of retail, and 100 parking spaces.

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December 16, 2013

Lucas' Proposed Presidio Museum Panned By National Park Service

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The Presidio Trust’s primary partner, the National Park Service, has just reiterated its concerns with the Trust's plans to redevelop the Presidio’s Commissary site across from Crissy Field and is strongly recommending that the Trust defer any decision for several years "to allow the site to develop in a more comprehensive, thoughtful, integrated, and planned manner."

The National Park Service has also expressed "serious concerns about the programmatic fit of the Lucas proposal," regardless of its architecture and design.

"From the information that has been presented to the public to date, we believe the program of the proposed Lucas Cultural Arts Museum has no genuine or substantive connection to the themes or programs of Crissy Field or the Main Post, or to other Presidio-connected themes that extend far beyond the boundaries of the post. While the programs of the proposed museum seem interesting, the museum’s offerings could be located anywhere; therefore, the museum does not merit one of the most important sites in the entire Presidio. The Trust’s own “Request for Proposal” spoke to the “Power of Place” as a primary theme: the Lucas proposal has no concrete reference to or interpretation of the Presidio."

The full letter to the Presidio Trust Board of Directors which was sent this past Thursday from Frank Dean, General Superintendent of the National Park Service:

Dear Trust Board Members:
We are proud to partner with the Presidio Trust in management of the lands, stories, and themes that comprise the Presidio. We have been pleased that the Presidio Trust has looked to the National Park Service for advice on the future use of the Commissary site. Because this site is located in a uniquely central position - precisely at the connection point between the NPS-managed lands of Crissy Field, and the Trust-managed Main Post - our interest in the right choice for the Commissary is very strong.
We appreciate that the Trust Board has at least temporarily delayed reaching a decision on the future use of the Commissary site. However, we must again express our strong recommendation, echoed by many others, that the Trust defer any decision for several years to allow the site to develop in a more comprehensive, thoughtful, integrated, and planned manner.
As we conveyed in our September 23, 2013 letter, the national landmark designation of the Presidio - and especially this site - deserves a use that relates to the Presidio’s mission and values and that fits seamlessly within the surrounding parklands. The proper stewardship of the Presidio merits taking a long view. The Presidio Trust should not rush a decision of this importance, especially if there is a lack of public consensus and if obvious controversy exists. With the many improvements already approved and planned, such as the new tunnel top parklands and the Presidio visitor center, there is wisdom in allowing these new uses to settle in before selecting a major new use and tenant for the Commissary site.
In our earlier letter we outlined what we believe are critical questions that should be addressed by the project proponents. The key questions related to programmatic and architectural fit. They were framed to insure that any future use of the site would enhance its national park values, become part of a carefully crafted continuity of programs that illuminate the Presidio’s cultural and natural themes, and respect important design guidelines and standards.
We are aware that the Trust has raised serious issues regarding the architectural design and scale of the proposed Lucas Cultural Arts Museum. But architecture aside, we have serious concerns about the programmatic fit of the Lucas proposal - something that is of paramount importance to us.
From the information that has been presented to the public to date, we believe the program of the proposed Lucas Cultural Arts Museum has no genuine or substantive connection to the themes or programs of Crissy Field or the Main Post, or to other Presidio-connected themes that extend far beyond the boundaries of the post. While the programs of the proposed museum seem interesting, the museum’s offerings could be located anywhere; therefore, the museum does not merit one of the most important sites in the entire Presidio. The Trust’s own “Request for Proposal” spoke to the “Power of Place” as a primary theme: the Lucas proposal has no concrete reference to or interpretation of the Presidio.
As you know, we have been working hard – together – to provide a cohesive visitor experience from the future Heritage Center on the south end of the Main Post to Crissy Field and its array of recreational activities and the acclaimed youth and family programs of the Crissy Field Center. We feel that only a use that enhances the opportunity to build the thematic and programmatic connections that NPS and the Trust have been working closely together for years to achieve should be selected for the site.
We offer these additional comments out of a desire to make certain the decision of the Trust Board is clearly informed by the perspective of the Trust’s primary partner at the Presidio, the National Park Service. To reiterate a point from our September letter, we commend the Trust for the openness of the very public process you have employed in reaching this very challenging decision. We request that you continue this openness throughout the rest of the process.
Sincerely,
Frank Dean
General Superintendent

As it stands, revised proposals for redeveloping the Presidio’s former Commissary and current Sports Basement site across from Crissy Field are due on January 17, 2014 with the Trust Board having originally planned to indicate a direction for the Mid-Crissy Field site soon thereafter.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

December 13, 2013

Despite The Boom, Foreclosures Are Still Happening In San Francisco

The Palms (555 4th Street)

In pre-foreclosure since 2009 when $14,047 past due on a $580,000 loan, the top-floor unit #927 at The Palms (555 4th Street) was finally foreclosed upon and taken back by the bank this past October with no bidders at $649,000 on the courthouse steps. The unit has been purchased for $725,000 in June of 2007 with 20 percent down.

Listed for $624,900 nine days ago, the bank is now accepting offers for the 699 square foot condo from those who are planning to use it as their primary residence. Offers will be accepted from investors or those looking for a second home if it hasn't moved in a week.

While there are no other units at The Palms currently in pre-foreclosure or scheduled for auction, there are 275 other properties in the current San Francisco foreclosure pipeline.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

December 12, 2013

Proposal To Immediately Revitalize San Francisco's Pier 38 Picked

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While it hasn't been announced, TMG's proposal for the redevelopment of San Francisco’s Pier 38 has beaten out the competing proposal from San Francisco Waterfront Partners according to a plugged-in tipster.

TMG's proposal emphasized the speed of redevelopment with a plan for the "immediate revitalization of the Pier 38 Bulkhead with a mix of public, office, and maritime uses." The Waterfront Partners' proposal included a tech co-working facility on the second floor of the building at the front of the pier and a beer garden facing the new Brannan Street Wharf.

The Pier 38 buildings have been red tagged as unsafe for occupancy since 2011 when serving as office space for a number of startups and a couple of venture capital firms. The Port's pick of a plan to quickly re-tenant the front part of the pier shouldn’t catch any plugged-in people by surprise.

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

December 10, 2013

An Elegant Three-Bedroom Nob Hill Condo For $550 A Square Foot

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Listed for $1,449,000 two months ago, the asking price for the three-bedroom Nob Hill condo #106 at 850 Powell Street (a.k.a. The Francesca) has recently been reduced to $1,349,000.

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With a box beam ceiling in the dining room, a wood burning fireplace in the living room and a remodeled kitchen, the elegant 2,461 square foot unit is now priced at $548 per square foot.

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Not included in the list price, however, is parking in the building (which is leased and "available on a seniority basis") and HOA dues of $2,058.82 a month.

The condo was purchased for $587,000 in 1999 at which point the average 30-year mortgage rate was around 7 percent, a rate at which a $2,059 monthly payment would have serviced around $350,000 in debt versus closer to $550,000 at today’s 30-year rate.

∙ Listing: 850 Powell Street #106 (3/3) 2,461 sqft - $1,349,000 [850powell106.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (25) | (email story)

Due Date And Decision For Mid-Crissy Field Plans Pushed Back

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While revised proposals for redeveloping the Presidio’s former Commissary and current Sports Basement site across from Crissy Field were originally due on January 3, the deadline has been pushed back by two weeks to January 17, 2014.

The date for the Presidio Trust’s public Board Meeting to discuss the revised proposals remains unscheduled and the reference to the Trust Board indicating a direction for the Mid-Crissy Field site in January has just been removed from the Presidio Trust’s timeline.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

December 9, 2013

The Second Church of Christ Scientist's Second Coming As Condos

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A plan to raze the Second Church of Christ Scientist church on the southeast corner of Dolores and Cumberland and build a smaller church and eight dwelling units on the site was drafted back in 2006 but ran into a wall of neighborhood opposition and was never approved.

Having since been yellow-tagged by the City as an unreinforced masonry building which doesn’t meet current seismic standards, plans to reinforce the building and convert the vacant 22,000 square foot church into four residential units are moving forward with the Planning Department's recommendation that the proposed conversion be approved this week.

As we first reported about the proposed "Light House" project in September, new partition walls within the existing auditorium and mezzanine would divide the space for three of the new dwelling units while an all new penthouse level would be created by raising the suspended ceiling seven feet and adding a new 3,020 square foot floor beneath the dome:

As proposed, the existing surface parking lot behind the church would be converted into a landscaped garden and a four car garage would be constructed in the basement (click to enlarge).

The estimated construction cost for the conversion is "between $1,165,000 and $2,200,000" and will take nine months with projected occupancy in the spring of 2015 if approved.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

December 4, 2013

A Luxury Two-Bedroom Dogpatch Loft For A Grand

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A 712 square foot Potrero Launch two-bedroom loft with polished concrete floors, stainless steel appliances, barn style bedroom doors and a whole host of building amenities including complimentary Wi-Fi is now available for $1,078 per month. And yes, there's a catch or two.

As part of San Francisco's Below Market Rate (BMR) Affordable Housing Program, the income for the tenants of the Dogpatch two-bedroom cannot exceed 50% of the Area Median Income, a maximum household income of $40,500 for two people or $45,550 for three. At the same time, the minimum household income to qualify for apartment E305 is at least $32,340 a year.

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Applications for the two-bedroom BMR are due on December 9 with a lottery to follow depending upon the number of applicants. A market-rate two-bedroom of 852 square feet is also available in the building at 2235 Third Street for $3,950 a month, no lottery needed, and a 360 square foot studio for $2,425 which is nine dollars less than average in San Francisco these days.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

December 3, 2013

Plans And Timing For Pier 70's Historic Rehab Revealed

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With Forest City having secured initial Port and City endorsements for their plan to develop a mixed-use neighborhood on the Waterfront Site of San Francisco's Pier 70 with up to 2.2 million square feet of office space; 400,000 square feet of retail, cultural, and maker uses; 1,000 housing units and 7 acres of parks, Orton Development is preparing to seek San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors approval for their plans to rehabilitate Pier 70's Historic Core, eight large buildings and two smaller structures located on or near 20th Street which are owned by the Port of San Francisco.

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The historic buildings include 270,000 square feet of existing space to which around 69,000 square feet of new space, primarily in mezzanines, will be added. Once rehabilitated, the historic office and industrial buildings will be used for a range of businesses, including light industrial, technology, life science, office, artisan/artist studios and showrooms, and restaurants.

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The top four floors of the Bethlehem Steel Office Building at the corner of Illinois and 20th Streets (Building 101) will return to office use while the building’s commissary on the lower level will likely be used for food production or light industrial use. Multiple offers from "well-established San Francisco restaurateurs" have already been received for building 102 next door:

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The former UIW headquarters and Navy Hospital Office (Building 104) will return to office use while the warehouse buildings (113/114, 115/116, and 14) will become "food, technology, life science, biotech, education and arts production centers, mirroring the high-quality "maker" type businesses currently thriving in the Dogpatch neighborhood" with office, showroom and retail uses as well.

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The 45,000 square foot machine shop courtyard behind Pier 70's historic warehouse buildings will be used as an outdoor venue for public and private events, including farmer's markets, concerts, exhibitions and festivals throughout the year.

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Assuming the Orton's plans are approved by the Board this month, construction is slated to commence in early 2014 with the first tenancy of building 101 planned for April 2015 and the overall rehabilitation of Pier 70's historic core to be completed by the end of 2016.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (16) | (email story)

December 2, 2013

Planning To Chop The Clock Tower From Atop 200 California Street

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The six-story building at the corner of California and Front was built as the headquarters for Home Savings of America in 1988, replacing a three-story building which had sat on the site since 1908 which replaced a two-story building on the site before.

Constructed in "a post-modern style common to that era" that "draws attention to itself, rather than blend in with the context" of the surrounding buildings, the owners of 200 California are now proposing to cut the clock tower from atop the building, add operable windows, and re-coat its exterior in order to reposition the building as one "that’s less identifiable by its decorative elements than by its occupants, retail presence, and location."

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A Boxwood hedge around the perimeter of the roof and potted trees would aim to soften the edge of the roof parapet, but no public nor private rooftop space is proposed.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (32) | (email story)

Zoned For 400 Feet In Height, 200 Feet Proposed For 300 California

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The eight-story building at 300 California Street was constructed in 1946, rising 112 feet in height with 77 parking spaces for autos in an underground garage below. A plan to raze the building and build 20 stories on the site was proposed back in 1996 but abandoned.

On the boards since 2007, a plan to simply add four stories atop the existing building at the corner of California and Battery has been dusted-off, a plan which will bring the downtown building's height to 192 feet in an area zoned for the development up to 400.

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A 1,200 square foot publicly-accessible rooftop garden would be built as part of the project.

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As the expanded 300 California Street building and corner would look fully rendered:

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San Francisco's Planning Department is recommending that the City's Planning Commission approve the four story addition as proposed this week.

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Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

November 27, 2013

The Designs For Apple's Proposed Union Square Store Plaza

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As part of the design for Apple's proposed flagship store on Union Square, the Grand Hyatt Hotel Plaza between the existing Levi’s Store and Grand Hyatt Hotel will be reconfigured.

In addition to moving Ruth Asawa's San Francisco Fountain a little to the north and a foot closer to the street, the rectangular tree-lined plaza behind the proposed Apple store would terminate at a new water feature wall at the west end of the plaza with concrete benches, large planter boxes, and a stone-paved area for tables and chairs between.

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Recessed light fixtures would illuminate the plaza, fountain and wall of water at night:

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Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

November 26, 2013

High Speed Rail Ruling Threatens Transbay Terminal Plan As Well

Sacramento Superior Court Judge Michael Kenny has ruled that California's High Speed Rail Authority cannot access the $9 billion in bonds that voters had approved for the HSR project back in 2008. While the ruling doesn’t kill HSR in California outright, it does drive a significant stake, or sharp tie, through the project's pocketbook. From the LA Times:

Kenny ruled that the state does not have a valid financing plan, which was required under the 2008 bond measure, Proposition 1A. The measure included provisions intended to ensure the state did not start the project if it did not have all of the necessary funds to complete a self-supporting, initial operating segment.
The state rail agency created a funding plan, but it was an estimated $25 billion short of the amount needed to complete a first working section of the line.
Kenny ruled that the state must rescind the plan and create a new one, a difficult task because the state High-Speed Rail Authority hasn't identified sources of additional revenue to allocate to the project.

In addition, Kenny ruled officials "made critical errors in approving the sale of the bonds" and declined to legally validate their sale but did refuse to grant a request to stop California's HSR project in its tracks or cancel construction contracts which have already been issued.

The state has argued it can use federal grant funds, which are not subject to the conditions of Proposition 1A, to start construction. But eventually the state will have to match federal grant funds. Without access to bond funds, the legislature would have to appropriate money from a different source.

The ruling doesn't only threaten California's High Speed Rail project but also the 1.4 mile extension of Caltrain from Forth and King to San Francisco's new Transbay Transit Center, a billion-dollar-plus project which would have to be funded by the City and Caltrain if the dollars for HSR fall short.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (144) | (email story)

Former Giants Party Pad Facing Strike Three

3157 Baker Street

The one-time Marina party pad of former San Francisco Giants' pitchers Brian Wilson and Barry Zito, 3157 Baker Street was on the market in 2008 for $5,000,000 before being relisted for $3,695,000 in 2010 as the "former residence to celebrity chef, CEOs, [and] professional athletes" and then offered for rent at $13,500 a month via Craigslist.

Having avoided being foreclosed upon 2011 despite being in default since 2009 when $35,875 behind on a $2,283,000 loan, the five-bedroom "Marina Mansion" at 3157 Baker Street is once again scheduled to hit the courthouse steps this afternoon in San Francisco with what would appear to be over $800,000 in past due payments and fees now owed on that aforementioned loan.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

November 25, 2013

Catching Fire On Mission Street At $2,550 Per Square Foot

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As we noted when the 1,664 square foot condo on the 48th floor of San Francisco’s Millennium Tower hit the market in February asking $4,500,000, the Millennium Tower wasn't built with any fireplaces in place, but that didn’t stop the buyer of 301 Mission Street #48B from adding one.

Purchased as new for $2,400,000 in February of 2010, the Grand Residence was more or less gutted and rebuilt over the course of a year. And in addition to the new alcohol burning fireplace, the second bedroom was reconfigured as a library with an electronically controlled Murphy bed behind the Ebony cabinetry and the master bathroom was rebuilt in marble, limestone and glass:

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This past Friday, the sale of 301 Mission Street #48B closed escrow on Friday with a reported contract price of $4,250,000 or just over $2,550 per listed square foot.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

November 22, 2013

Presidio Trust Punts On Mid-Crissy Plans But Remains Enthusiastic

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Reaffirming its "strong commitment to accomplishing an outcome in the Mid-Crissy area that will protect the park and bring long-term benefit to the Presidio and its visitors," the Presidio Trust Board of Directors has exercised its option of "not necessarily selecting any team" to redevelop the former Commissary and current Sports Basement site across from Crissy Field and has asked the three finalists to revise and resubmit their proposals.

"The Board believes that there is tremendous thought, creativity, and potential in the proposals offered by the three finalists. The Board also understands that it holds the option of not necessarily selecting any team at this point. Such is the importance of the site that we take seriously our duty to do right by it, even if that means waiting. That said, we are very enthusiastic about the proposals, and appreciate the wonderful work that has gone into them, the generosity behind them, and the promise they hold for enhancing the Presidio.
We have sought to engage in a fair and open public process – from the development of the Mid-Crissy design guidelines, to the release, in November 2012, of the Request for Concept Proposals and the subsequent Request for Proposals. In the interest of transparency, the Board would like to share its observations at this point in the process."

Focusing on "achieving program clarity, ensuring the building's compatibility with the Presidio, and understanding how economic viability will be assured," the Board's observations and feedback for the three finalists to consider should they elect to revise and resubmit a proposal:

Feedback for The Bridge/Sustainability Institute Team:
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An amazing architectural group has teamed up with a compelling programmatic visionary around the issues of sustainability. We agree with the proponents that sustainability is “perhaps the defining issue of our time,” and appreciate the blending of the physical building and the program in an effort to advance a holistic understanding of sustainability. We also see a clear connection between the sustainability issue and our work at the Presidio – in environmental restoration, historic preservation, environmental education, and financial sustainability. We are concerned, however, about the institutional capacity of the team to, without significant funds or fundraising help from the Trust, deliver and sustain the project financially. We encourage the WRNS/Chora team to bring more clarity to the question of who might fund the building and early programming, and what institution will be created to operate and sustain the Bridge. While the building is “light on the land,” it is also too large and we urge some consolidation of the building program.

Feedback Lucas Cultural Arts Museum (LCAM) Team:
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The Board recognizes and appreciates both the generosity and opportunity represented in George Lucas’s offer to build a cultural arts museum in the Presidio. We are enthusiastic about the state-of-the-art exhibits, strong community programming, and notable art collection that is offered in the proposal. The Trust is particularly excited about the potential of exceptional educational programming to draw diverse audiences to the museum and the greater Presidio. Despite this, we have significant issues with the proposed building – its massing and height, and its architectural style – and believe should be redesigned to be more compatible with the Presidio. We would also like to understand more fully the potential role of the Trust in partnership with LCAM, particularly in creating programmatic connections that would add value to other park programs throughout the Presidio.

Feedback for the Presidio Exchange (PX) Team
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There is no question about the level of expertise, design excellence and community engagement that the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy brings to each project it undertakes. The Presidio, and the broader Golden Gate National Recreation Area, is replete with examples of the Conservancy’s good work and of its ethos of partnership in the public interest. The Conservancy’s approach to programming at the PX – intended to be varied, flexible and relevant over time to park audiences – is fascinating. Yet, these attributes also make it harder to understand what the PX is truly striving for programmatically. What is the master narrative? Is there an overall theme, or focus, that can be better articulated so that the Trust will understand how PX programming will differ from/complement existing or planned programs, such as the Presidio Visitor Center, Heritage Center, and Crissy Field Center?

Revised proposals are due by January 3, 2014 with a public meeting to discuss the revisions to be scheduled for later that month. The Presidio Trust Board will indicate a direction for the Mid-Crissy site following the public meeting in January.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (33) | (email story)

November 19, 2013

Goodwill Selling Mission Street Site Zoned For 320-Foot Tower

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Zoned for development up to 320 feet in height, Goodwill Industries is preparing to sell its two and three story buildings along Mission Street between South Van Ness Avenue and 11th Street.

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The 2.3 acre parcel upon which Goodwill’s San Francisco headquarters and prominent corner store sit could accommodate the development up to 600 housing units according to the Business Times.

The site which had been in contract to be sold to developer David Choo in 2007 prior to the market crash in San Francisco is expected to hit the market in early 2014.

Having outgrown the current buildings on the block and expected to reap up to $60 million on the Mission Street sale, Goodwill plans to "seek alternate site(s) for all of its current Mission Street functions, ideally within the city of San Francisco."

UPDATE: While the Van Ness and Market Downtown Residential Special Use District in which Goodwill's property sits allows for heights of up to 400 feet at the corners of Market and Van Ness, the parcels above are currently zoned for development up to 320 feet mid-block along South Van Ness and 11th Street, with the corner of South Van Ness and Mission currently zoned for up to 250 feet in height and the majority of the Mission Street frontage zoned for no more than 85 feet.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (23) | (email story)

November 15, 2013

Designs For Developing Half A City Block Along Hayes

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As we first reported last week, the Emerald Fund is quietly working on plans to raze the 108-foot building at 150 Van Ness Avenue and build a half-block building rising 12 stories on the site, and we now have the renderings for the development that's being proposed.

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Once again, the building would rise up to 120 feet high and house 429 apartments averaging 734 square feet apiece, running the length of Hayes Street from Van Ness to Polk Street:

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And as proposed, 9,000 square feet of retail would be constructed on the ground floor of the building with parking for 215 cars and 207 bikes in a level below.

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Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

Nine Months Later And One (SOMA) Grand More

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The 1,146 square foot southeast corner condo on the 18th floor of the 22-story SOMA Grand was first purchased for $1,160,000 in 2008. Nine months ago the condo resold for $1,198,000 and then three months ago the two-bedroom hit the market listed for $1,289,000.

Reduced to $1,269,000 last month, the list price for 1160 Mission Street #1806 was just reduced again, this time to $1,199,000 which is $1,000 more than its purchase price of nine months ago or 3 percent more than in 2008.

Do keep in mind that the SOMA Grand's homeowners association has filed suit against the building’s developer, builder, and architects as we first reported six months ago, which is why the "pending litigation" box is checked on the listing.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

SFMOMA's New Snøhetta-Designed Staircase On Display

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The design for Snøhetta's new grand staircase to rise within SFMOMA which replaces Mario Botta's original and will serve as a bridge between the existing atrium and the museum's 235,000 square foot expansion has been rendered and is on display.

The stair spans a single rise, from the ground level of the Haas Atrium to the Art Court on the second floor, signaling that the continuation of one’s journey is directly ahead and keeping views toward that space open and transparent.
Rather than following a straight or spiral configuration, Snøhetta’s variation on a switchback design is inspired by the notion of traversing an incline. This zigzag movement will slow visitors as they climb through a beloved part of the museum and encourage them to pause and take in the beauty of the atrium and the art installed there.
Embracing architect Mario Botta’s original atrium design, the new stair will enhance the space for the display of art and allow a more direct experience of natural light streaming down from the oculus, which will be visible as a complete circle for the first time.

The expanded SFMOMA is on track for an early 2016 opening.

SFMOMA Expansion Rendering: View from Yerba Buena

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (27) | (email story)

November 12, 2013

The Destruction Of The Cathedral Hill Hotel

With the demolition of the old Jack Tar/Cathedral Hill Hotel underway in order to make room for CPMC’s Cathedral Hill Medical Center to rise, a plugged-in tipster delivers a few fantastic photos of the hotel's demise. The recreation deck is quickly disappearing, the clubhouse/ballroom is only a shell, and the hotel's swimming pool is history. Click either of the images to enlarge.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

Warriors' SF Arena Design Slimmed-Down And Opened Up

With parks, plazas and paths along the bay, the open space for the proposed Warriors Arena in San Francisco has grown from half of the project area to 60 percent in Design 3.0.

The slimmed-down design lowers the 18,064 seat arena's height from 135 to 125 feet, reduces the proposed retail and event center area along the Embarcadero by 30,000 square feet, and expands the open space to 7.6 acres (up by nearly an acre).

The entrance to the arena's 500 space garage has been moved "mid-pier" to between Bryant and Beale and the height of the roof over the practice facility, parking garage and fire station on the northern end of the Piers 30/32 site has been lowered from 55 to 37 feet.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (70) | (email story)

A Peek At 535 Mission's Public Art Proposal And Pedestrian Linkage

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With the construction of the 27-story office tower at 535 Mission Street slated for completion in 2014, this week San Francisco’s Planning Commission will get their first peek at the two proposed works of art to fulfill San Francisco’s One Percent for the Arts requirement.

The first piece is a sculptural composition of bronze, copper and steel by Anton Josef Standteiner to be installed at the corner of Minna Street and Shaw Alley. Entitled "The Band," Standteiner's piece consists of four separate sculptures representing members of a music group with each sculpture measuring approximately 10 feet in height (click renderings to enlarge):

The second work of art is a linear piece of dichroic and mirrored glass mounted to a stone backing. Gordon Huether's "Applique Da Parete" would be mounted within the lobby of 535 Mission Street with portions extending outdoors beyond the glass curtain wall of the building:

Both artworks are intended "to enliven and engage Shaw Alley," the public right-of-way next to the Salt House which will be closed to vehicular traffic and upgraded with paving, lighting, and landscape treatments to serve as a pedestrian linkage between Mission Street and San Francisco’s new Transbay Transit Center which is slated to open in 2017.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

November 8, 2013

San Francisco’s Caltrain Railyard Redevelopment Update And Post 2019 Plans

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An update on the potential redevelopment of San Francisco's Fourth and King Street Railyard and station, the current terminus for Caltrain in the city, was presented to Caltrain’s Board of Directors yesterday.

In summary, the two most likely options are limited redevelopments of a portion of the existing yard fronting Townsend and 4th Streets and possibly along King, while the complete redevelopment of San Francisco’s 4th and King Street Yard is a stretch.

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In terms of timing, don’t expect anything to happen before 2019, the year by which the electrification of Caltrain should be finished. And that "not before 2019" date includes any extension of Caltrain’s service to San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center which is slated to open in 2017.

The Vision For San Francisco's Fourth And King Street Railyard [SocketSite]

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Big Plans For 12 Stories And Over 400 New Apartments On Hayes

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With the re-skinning and conversion of 100 Van Ness Avenue from an office building to 400 apartments underway, the Emerald Fund has quietly submitted plans to raze the adjacent 108-foot building at 150 Van Ness and build a new 12-story, 120-foot tall building stretching all the way from Van Ness to Polk along Hayes Street.

In addition to the 150 Van Ness parcel on the corner, the proposed half city block project would cover the four adjacent surface parking lots and yield 429 new apartments over 9,000 square feet of retail and an underground garage with parking for 218 cars and 211 bikes.

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The propose unit mix for the 429-unit development is currently 112 two-bedrooms with the rest one-bedrooms and studios. As always, we'll keep you posted and plugged-in.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (40) | (email story)

November 4, 2013

More Affordable Housing On Geary Proposed, But Only A Bit

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The Western Addition block bounded by Divisadero, Geary, Scott and O’Farrell was developed in the 1960s with six low-rise residential buildings around a central courtyard, the Midtown Park Apartment complex provides 140 affordable dwelling units managed by Mercy housing.

In need of a full renovation, the current plan is to renovate the four buildings with a total of 96 units which front Scott, O’Farrell and Divisadero and demolish the two buildings with a total of 44 units that currently front Geary Boulevard. Two new buildings containing up to 114 units would replace the two buildings proposed to be demolished, adding 70 units to the block.

The proposed new building for the corner of Geary and Divisadero above would occupy a similar footprint to the existing building but would reach a height of approximately 56 feet with a new active ground-floor use and 67 affordable units for seniors above.

The second proposed building with just under 40 affordable units for families along Geary Boulevard would also occupy a similar footprint as the building to be demolished but would be located ten to fifteen feet closer to the street, increasing the amount of interior open space on the lot.

Currently only zoned for medium density with a 50-foot height limit, should the project and necessary "up-zoning" by a few feet be approved as proposed, the full city block at the intersection of Divisadero and Geary upon which two major bus lines run will provide just over 200 units of housing with construction slated to start at the end of 2014.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

November 1, 2013

Conversion Of Illegal Mid-Market Apartment Building Suspended

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Noted by a plugged-in reader last week, San Francisco’s Department of Building Inspection and the San Francisco Planning Department have just suspended the building permit for the conversion of 1049 Market Street from its current illegal residential use in order "to enable the City to obtain additional details about the building's historic and current occupancies."

On the radar of the Department of Building Inspection since at least 2007, around half the 75 units within the Mid-Market building between Sixth and Seventh Streets lack windows and are not code compliant for residential use but have been illegally rented to artists and others as "live-work" spaces for over a decade, as have the majority of other units within the building which have windows but were never legally converted from office to residential use.

"We clearly need to investigate further the recent residential occupancy of this building," said John Rahaim, Director of Planning. "Given the apparent long-term residential uses of the building, the owners may be required to undergo additional Planning Department review and public hearings, and to pay impact fees if they want to pursue the eviction of the tenants and establish an office building."

San Francisco’s Building Inspection Department issued a notice to the owners of 1049 Market Street to either legalize the building or clear the building of residential tenants a few months ago at which point eviction notices were prepared and served.

The building's former owners had filed a permit to legalize the building for residential use two years ago but never commenced the conversion and the building's new owners have decided it makes more economic sense to convert the Mid-Market building back to office use.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

Historic Market Street Hotel And Club Project Ready To Proceed

1095 Market

As we first reported in 2010, the plans to rehabilitate the Joseph D. Grant Building at 1095 Market Street and convert the eight-story building from office use to a hotel/hostel with 94 rooms, a 2,500 square foot ground floor restaurant, a 3,500 square foot nightclub and two rooftop terraces totaling 8,500 square feet were making their way through Planning.

1095 Market as Proposed

Approved for development in October of 2010 with a three year window get going or lose their entitlements to develop, the project has yet to get started. From the project sponsor's counsel:

"Implementation of the project has been delayed for two primary reasons. First, the economic downturn in 2009 made construction financing difficult to obtain. This was particularly true for the project sponsor 1095 Market Street Associates, which is a family-owned and operated company based in San Francisco. Second, the costs of implementing the project were more significant than previously anticipated. The task of thoughtfully rehabilitating a historic building presents certain unique uncertainties and challenges that reveal themselves as the project moves closer to construction. Our client believes that they are now in a position to move forward with the project and respectfully request the Planning Commission’s support."

Next week, we expect San Francisco's Planning Commission to extend the project's window to get started, clearing the way for the development of 1095 Market at the corner of 7th to proceed.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

October 31, 2013

Celebrity Top Chef Suvir Saran Coming To 10th And Market

10th and Market

Celebrity "Top Chef" Suvir Saran has leased 8,500 square feet at the base of NEMA on the corner of 10th and Market Streets with plans to open a yet-to-be-named restaurant "created specifically for San Franciscans." The restaurant is slated to open in the Spring of 2014.

Under Saran's direction in New York, Dévi became the first Indian restaurant in the United States to earn a Michelin Star.

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

October 24, 2013

Ten Story Building Proposed Atop 16th Street BART Station Site

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Maximus Real Estate Partners is in contract to buy the 57,000 square foot parcel above the 16th Street BART station on the northeast corner of Mission Street and has submitted plans to build a 10-story building designed by Skidmore Owings & Merrill with 351 housing units, 32,000 square feet of retail and a 56,000-square-foot basement parking garage on the site.

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From JK Dinnen at the Business Times:

The proposal calls for airy plate glass storefronts, with 14-foot floor-to-ceiling heights, which would wrap around the BART plaza and continue along Mission and 16th streets. The group says the blank facades currently ringing the BART Plaza on Mission and Capp streets represent "a significant contributing factor to the high crime rate at the intersection of 16th and Mission."

The sale of the parcel which includes an existing Walgreens, the Hwa Lei Market, the City Club bar, two restaurants and a defunct dollar store, all of which would be razed, is contingent upon approvals of the proposed development by the city.

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Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (92) | (email story)

October 23, 2013

Is San Francisco Getting The Short End Of The Saitowitz Stick?

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With the Stanley Saitowitz designed "Garden Village", a 77-unit development of 18 interconnected buildings of three to five stories in height with 16 rooftop farm plots above and a fleet of four to ten shared cars for residents in a small garage below having been approved for development by Berkeley’s Zoning and Adjustment Board two weeks ago, a number of readers can’t but wonder if San Francisco has been getting the short end of the Saitowitz design stick.

Of course it's not always the architects who are to blame for bad building designs in San Francisco as the City's Planning process can be a challenge to navigate and many developers have been known to choose greater profits over great design.

Targeting students, the Garden Village development is slated to break ground at 2201 Dwight Way in Berkeley next year and be ready for occupancy and farming in 2015.

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Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

Targeting Seven Percent More After Seven Months For A Saitowitz

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Seven months after having closed escrow on the purchase of condo #202 within the new Stanley Saitowitz designed development at 2020 Ellis Street for $599,000, the buyer has returned the 648 square foot one-bedroom to the market listed for $639,000.

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While the property on the border of NoPa is "apples-to-apples" in terms of its condition as compared to seven months ago, keep in mind that the CityTarget at Masonic and Geary which is three blocks away has since opened its doors even wider than those between the bedroom and bath.

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∙ Listing: 2020 Ellis #202 (1/1) 648 sqft - $639,000 [2020ellisunit202.com]
San Francisco's Second CityTarget Has Opened Its Doors [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

October 22, 2013

The MJB Coffee Building Is Currently Home To A Bunch Of Illegals

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Built in 1916 and designed G. Albert Langsburgh, the five-story MJB Coffee building at 665 3rd Street is technically still a print shop which is not legally zoned for office use.

Having been used for offices since at least 2007, however, the building's owners have applied to legitimize its use, creating a Historic Building Maintenance Plan in order to clear the way for the conversion of the building which was rejected in 2012.

The conversion would require at least four showers and a locker room to be added to the building per San Francisco's Planning Code, but the building's owners plan to seek an exemption and provide access to a health club or other facility within three blocks of the building at no cost to the tenants. Founders Den members take note.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

October 16, 2013

Protecting San Francisco’s Historic Fabric Amid Its Boom

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With the population of San Francisco projected to grow by 20 percent over the next two decades, hitting the one million mark around 2035, many new buildings will need to be built and existing buildings repurposed.

Believing that it’s critical to protect the historic fabric of the city while supporting growth and change, San Francisco Architectural Heritage and SPUR have examined "the city’s processes for preservation planning, project review and decision-making." The conclusion of their joint policy report which is being presented to San Francisco’s Historic Preservation Commission this afternoon:

San Francisco has many wonderful historical resources worthy of protection. However, the process of reviewing proposed changes to historical resources in existing, identified and potential historic districts is in need of improvement. In particular, the way the CEQA process relates to historic preservation issues can be murky and complex, especially in areas that have not undergone a formal historic survey process.

The report’s 19 recommendations to improve the historic preservation process and create rules and guidelines that are "clear, consistent and transparent" in San Francisco:

1. Complete a citywide [Historic Resource] survey.
2. Conduct [Historic Resource] surveys early in the area plan process so that the survey results can be used to help inform planning activities.
3. Solicit public input in the development of context statements and themes.
4. Notify the public, district property owners, residents and business owners at the outset of the survey process. Explain why the survey is occurring, the potential benefits and impacts of being part of a survey area and how survey data will be used.
5. Publish community outreach standards and policies for historic resource surveys.
6. Develop a user-friendly grievance process.

7. Publish planning department community engagement policies and procedures for historic districts in a new administrative bulletin.
8. Develop clear design guidelines that interpret how best to apply the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties to individual historic districts.
9. Provide a clear mechanism to enable project applicants to request advisory opinions from the San Francisco Historic Preservation Commission’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC) in order to obtain the group’s input on compliance with design guidelines early in the process.
10. Expand local access to historic preservation incentives, including state Mills Act property tax relief for historic property owners.

11. Publish guidelines that identify significant historical themes, associated property types and thresholds of significance for the purpose of making CEQA determinations on individual buildings.
12. Revise Preservation Bulletin 16 to provide clear guidelines on how to evaluate the impacts of major alterations or demolition of contributors within historic districts.
13. Encourage collaboration between planning department staff and property owners (and their architects) so that compliance with the Secretary’s Standards can be achieved more quickly and efficiently.
14. Provide a clear mechanism to enable project applicants to seek an advisory opinion from the ARC when they cannot reach agreement with planning department staff on interpretation of the Secretary’s Standards.
15. Complete a citywide survey so that historical resources are identified systematically and prospectively, rather than on an ad hoc basis during CEQA review (as per Recommendation No. 1).
16. Develop a new administrative bulletin defining the process for conducting historic resource evaluations (HREs). This bulletin should include guidance on when HREs should or should not be required for projects in designated historic districts, in potential historic districts or adjacent to or within view of historic districts.
17. Clarify the conditions under which the planning department can require project sponsors to complete their own survey work in an unsurveyed area; define the appropriate geographic boundaries and level of detail.
18. Clarify how alteration and development projects that are adjacent to landmarks and to designated, identified and potential districts (but not actually within one of these districts) should be treated for the purposes of CEQA review.
19. Complete the development of local interpretations and design guidelines based on the Secretary’s Standards per the recent update to Articles 10 and 11 of the San Francisco Planning Code.

The full report and details behind the recommendations: Historic Preservation In San Francisco.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

October 10, 2013

What's A Terrace, Parking And Modern Interior Worth On Nob Hill?

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While the sale of 30 Miller Place #1 which we featured last month has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $2,000,001, a neighbor notes that the unit two floors above (30 Miller Place #3) has recently cut its list price from $1,500,000 to $1,299,000.

While both units offer 1,782 square feet of interior space and the same big San Francisco views, keep in mind that unit number three doesn’t have number one's big private terrace or deeded parking spot, and its interior isn't nearly as contemporary (which can be changed).

∙ Listing: 30 Miller Place #3 (3/2) 1,782 sqft - $1,299,000 [nobhillview.com]
A Rather Great Room And Terrace With Even Greater Views [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

October 8, 2013

Dropping In On The Moss Flats Building

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Built in 1906 when "everything else in the vicinity was formed of obsolete and abandoned streetcars, imaginatively and otherwise adapted for use as clubhouses, restaurants and beach cabins," the Moss Flats Building at 1622-1626 Great Highway is "one of the few remainders from the early development of the ocean frontage as a beach and health resort."

With its three two-bedroom units currently rented for between $1,447 and $1,920 a month (to "elite members of [the] SF surf scene" according to our tipster), the Moss Flats building has been on the market for about a month and listed for $1,349,000.

Moss Flats Building, 1626 Great Highway [noehill.com]
∙ Listing: 1622-1626 Great Highway - $1,349,000 [greathighwayflats.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

October 4, 2013

A Grand Jury's Call To Optimize San Francisco's City-Owned Real Estate

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The City and County of San Francisco owns 6,000 acres, or 20 percent of the land, within its County limits and another 92,000 acres beyond.

Concerned that surplus and underutilized real estate owned by San Francisco's City and County agencies could be put to better use ("providing for housing or commercial, cultural, and/or civic activities") and increase the City’s tax base, a Civil Grand Jury has come to the following six findings and recommendations for the City, including putting 170 Fell Street (pictured above) and its adjacent complex of historic buildings to a more productive use post-haste:

Finding 1:
Inadequate readily-accessible public information on publicly-owned real estate is part of the reason some properties have been allowed to languish and deteriorate, at a loss to the City. A more rational approach to handling under-utilized or surplus property requires that a comprehensive, detailed list of public properties is available on an ongoing basis.

The Fleishhacker Pool House is a perfect example of a situation where being “out of sight, out of mind” allowed a property to become so neglected that it eventually was destroyed by fire, resulting in a real loss for the City. A more transparent property database will make such occurrences less likely in future.

Recommendation 1.1:
The web-based San Francisco Property Information Map currently used to display
Planning and Building Inspection Department information should be integrated with and further developed by other departments to convey complete information about City properties. The Department of Technology and the Planning Department should work with and provide database access to all City departments enabling them to maintain the information on their properties.

Recommendation 1.2:
The online database of all properties owned by SFUSD and all City departments, including revenue-generating enterprise departments, needs to include information required by Chapter 23A of the Administrative Code [San Francisco’s Surplus City Property Ordinance].

Recommendation 1.3:
City departments, commissions and agencies should be directed to maintain and update their departmental real estate database, which appears in the Real Estate Division Map of Real Property and Property Book.

Recommendation 1.4:
The Director of Real Estate should be required to review the list annually to confirm that all departments have made a complete report on their properties, including surplus and underutilized properties, in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 23A of the Administrative Code; and the City Administrator should be required to report annually to the Board of Supervisors regarding the City’s real property assets.

Finding 2:
Lack of transparent public debate contributes to suboptimal use of City real estate assets.

The Kirkland Property is a perfect case in point. SFMTA may have a good case for retaining the property as a bus maintenance yard as recommended by its consultant. However, allowing SFMTA to abandon stated plans for converting the property to commercial and/or residential use without public debate prevents possibly better, more economically efficient alternatives from being considered.

Recommendation 2:
The City and SFUSD should activate their respective Surplus Property Advisory Committees because the meetings of these committees provide a public forum in which to discuss best uses of publicly-owned real estate and each committee should be charged with monitoring uses of public property and making sure that there is ongoing accountability with respect to surplus and underutilized properties.

Finding 3:
The purposes for which the Surplus Property Ordinance was adopted are too narrow to effectively motivate City departments to identify surplus and underutilized properties for other uses or disposition. Further, the ordinance does not provide a department with any incentive to dispose of surplus or underutilized property.

Recommendation 3:
The Board of Supervisors should amend Chapter 23A of the Administrative Code to include an incentive for City Departments to identify and dispose of surplus and underutilized properties and to broaden the purposes for which surplus and underutilized properties may be used.

Finding 4:
Current practice allows City Departments and SFUSD to keep property on their surplus list indefinitely without any consequence. The concern for a more rational approach to handling under-utilized or surplus property requires that a time limit be imposed on how long property may remain on these lists. If, after a pre-determined period, property which is identified as surplus or underutilized has not been put into use or fully-utilized or no plans have been adopted for its use or full-utilization, there should be specified consequences for the failure to act.

Recommendation 4:
The Board of Supervisors and the SF Board of Education should each adopt rules which limit the length of time property may remain on their respective surplus list without action and which address consequences for such inaction.

Finding 5:
Passive management of publicly-owned real estate leads to valuable properties lying fallow for years. The City and SFUSD leadership must be charged and empowered to develop plans for utilization of surplus / under-utilized parcels, including public-private partnerships where feasible and desirable.

Very valuable properties owned by City departments and SFUSD have been underutilized for decades and present prime opportunities to be repurposed or sold to create value for the City and SFUSD. The properties at 155/165 Grove Street, the Fire Chief’s House at 870 Bush Street, the lot at 7th Avenue and Lawton Street, and 1950 Mission Street are a few examples of properties that have been passively managed.

Recommendation 5.1:
The SFUSD needs to designate someone who is given appropriate authority and whose time and energy is devoted to optimizing the use of surplus and under-utilized real estate through its development or disposition. That person should work with the Capital Planning Policy Committee and Surplus Property Advisory Committee to incorporate surplus and underutilized property into SFUSD’s 10-year rolling Capital Plan.

Recommendation 5.2:
The Capital Planning Policy Committee of the San Francisco Capital Planning Program should be made responsible for overseeing the publicly-owned surplus and underutilized property list for the City and for assuring that clear plans for the disposition or repurposing of such properties are generated and incorporated into the 10-year rolling capital plan of the Capital Planning Program.

Finding 6:
Given the location of 135 Van Ness Avenue and 170 Fell Street in the heart of the City’s cultural center, and the historic nature of the structures, their current status is far from the highest and best use of these unique properties. Plans by SFUSD to convert the properties into the School of the Arts have not moved forward because of, among other reasons, a lack of needed funding. Yet, at the time, and now, SFUSD owned and continues to own, sufficient surplus and underutilized property that if sold could fund the entire project.

Other alternative and better uses of this complex may be possible.

Recommendation 6:
The entire complex of historic buildings at 135 Van Ness / 170 Fell Street, including Nourse Auditorium, should be put to productive use by, for example, converting the complex into the School for the Arts.

The Civil Grand Jury's full report: Optimizing the Use of Publicly-Owned Real Estate.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

October 3, 2013

Larkin Street Redevelopment Take Three And Planning's Flop

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

Having been rejected twice, once in 2010 and again at the end of last year, the project sponsors of the proposed demolition the dilapidated First St. John's United Methodist Church at the corner of Larkin and Clay will once again seek the Planning Commission’s approval to build a new residential building upon the lot this afternoon.

The revised design for the development at 1601 Larkin Street which is down to five floors from six with additional setbacks and new finishes on the façade will yield 27 new dwelling units and 32 parking spaces as proposed.

The Planning Department which had originally supported the project but then flipped has flopped back to once again characterizing the project as “necessary and desirable” and recommends the project be approved.

1601 Larkin Street 3.1: The Redesign Details And Renderings [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin: Planning's Flip-Flop And Expected Disapproval Today [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

New NoPa Condos, Restaurants, And Another Threat As Proposed?

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While some fear that the proposed residential redevelopment of the Harding Theater on Divisadero could spell trouble for the Independent next door, it might be double trouble as the owner of the corner warehouse on the other side of the Independent is quietly working on plans to partially demolish the auto repair shop at 650 Divisadero Street and build a five-story residential building with nine units along Gove Street and three new commercial spaces, including two for new restaurants, along Divisadero.

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While the existing building’s façade along Divisadero would be retained, additional height would be added, including a proposed roof deck for the restaurants which is not currently permitted in the area but would be allowed per a proposed zoning change. Nine parking spaces for the residential portion of the development are proposed to be constructed underground.

With a parcel that could actually support the development of up to sixteen residential units, the Planning Department is "strongly encouraging" the project sponsors to increase the density of the project as proposed. As always, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (44) | (email story)

October 1, 2013

270 Brannan's Refined Design And Neighborhood Parking Concerns

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The refined design for the proposed office building to rise up to seven stories high on the parking lot between the historic Hawley and Gallo buildings at 270 Brannan Street is slated to be approved by San Francisco’s Planning Commission this week.

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The project will yield nearly 190,000 square feet of office space with a 5,000 square foot atrium and a private roof deck on the sixth floor:

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The proposed garage beneath the building includes space for 54 bikes but only 12 cars, 72 fewer parking spaces than the parcel currently provides which has the residents of 200 Brannan a bit concerned and requesting that the Planning Commission require a greater number of parking spaces "so that the availability of street parking is not further reduced by this project."

The Planning Department recommends the project be approved with the tweleve parking spaces as proposed.

Designs For Building Up On Brannan And Parking Going Down [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (42) | (email story)

Plans To Honor Rincon Hill's Past For Its Future To Rise

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In order to make way for the 400 foot residential tower that’s getting ready to rise at 340 Fremont Street, the two former maritime union halls at 340 and 350 Fremont Street will need to be razed.

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And as a condition of approval for the two historical halls to be demolished, the developer will include interpretative displays on the history of Maritime Unions on Rincon Hill as part of the project.

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The details and designs for the proposed exterior and interior displays:

As designed by Page & Turnbull and Handel Architects (Project Architects), the interpretative display includes a series of interpretative panels located on the exterior within the mid‐block public passage and an interpretative video kiosk located within the interior off of the main public lobby.
On the exterior, the interpretative display would be located along the mid‐block public passage and would be demarcated with a 18” by 18” bronze case plaque. The exhibit includes six panels (each measuring approximately 3‐ft by 2‐ft) located on a corten steel pedestal, and imprinted with images and texts.
The exterior interpretative exhibit includes a salvaged flagpole, which would be located at the end of the mid-block public passage and mounted with banners of the union crests.

A stainless steel video kiosk designed to mimic the existing job board within the union hall at 350 Fremont Street will be located within a small viewing room off of the residential lobby of the new tower with a looping video presentation of the area’s history.

The designs for the exterior and interior displays will be presented to San Francisco’s Historic Preservation Commission for approval tomorrow.

The Clock Is Ticking For The 400-Foot Tower At 340 Fremont [SocketSite]
Neighborhood Scoop: 340 Fremont's Refined Design And Parking [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 5:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (21) | (email story)

September 25, 2013

74 Condos Ready To Rise At 72 Townsend Street

72 Townsend Rendering

With the building permits to add seven stories and seventy-four condos atop the existing 31-foot warehouse at 72 Townsend Street quietly reinstated at the end of 2012, the project has been sold to KB Homes which plans to start work next month.

The 74 new South Beach condos which will range in size from 810 to 2,859 square feet and come with one parking space apiece should be ready for occupancy by the middle of 2015 with a sales office opening next summer.

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

September 20, 2013

Potrero Hill Compound Takes A Million Off The Top

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If it was the $5,995,000 price tag which was keeping you away from making an offer to buy the Potrero Hill compound on the corner of Mariposa and Utah, perhaps the one million dollar price cut will make you change your mind; now asking $4,995,000 for the 6,645 square foot former art school building which was converted to legal dwelling units in 1987.

2255 Mariposa Living

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September 18, 2013

The Sports Basement's New Presidio Home

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While it’s not a done deal, when the Sports Basement vacates the Presidio’s former Commissary building in order to make way for the winner of the Presidio Trust's Cultural Center competition, the retailer will most likely be moving down Mason Street to the warehouses at the Marina Gate.

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As proposed, the seven warehouses at the eastern entrance to the Presidio will be renovated, connected, and their loading docks extended to yield 93,000 square feet of space for the retailer and nearly 30,000 square feet of exterior deck and courtyards for strolling, gathering, and events.

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Parking for the new Sports Basement would be accommodated within the 213-space parking lot which will be built behind and beside the warehouses as part of the ongoing Doyle Drive project.

The Three Competing Designs For The Presidio's Commissary Site [SocketSite]
Presidio Parkway's Final Phase And Commissary’s Sporting Days [SocketSite]
Sports Basement Mason Street Warehouses Project [presidio.gov]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

September 17, 2013

The Three Competing Designs For The Presidio's Commissary Site

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The three final proposals for redeveloping the Presidio's former Commissary site which is currently occupied by Sports Basement have been received by the Presidio Trust and will be presented to the public on September 23. If you'd like to take a peek at the proposed designs and uses for the 16-acre site prior to the public presentation, however, here they are:

1. George Lucas' Cultural Arts Museum Proposal (Final)
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2. The Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy's Presidio Exchange Proposal (Final)
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3. The Bridge/Sustainability Institute's Proposal (Final)
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While no specific date has been given, the winning concept is expected to be selected and announced either later this year or early in 2014.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (44) | (email story)

September 16, 2013

Final Proposals For Presidio Development Due By Five PM Today

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With three teams having made the Presidio Trust's cut, final proposals for redeveloping the former Commissary and current Sports Basement site across from Crissy Field are due by 5pm today.

From the New York Times with respect to George Lucas' proposed Cultural Arts Museum, one of the three finalists which comes with a pledge of $700 million of Lucas' own money to fund and endow the museum and has been endorsed by Mayor Ed Lee:

In an interview, Mr. Lucas said that the Presidio staff and board had "stalled" for four years on the project and snubbed his taste in architecture as an exercise in mere "mimicking." Should San Francisco reject his latest proposal, Mr. Lucas is threatening to build his pop-culture palace in Chicago.

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Mr. Lucas said that Nancy H. Bechtle, chairwoman of the Presidio board, criticized his idea for a building that recycled a historical style rather than pioneered a new one. His proposal calls for a conservative Beaux-Arts building topped by a dome and takes its inspiration from the fairgrounds of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, held in San Francisco in 1915.

"There’s nothing wrong with replicating old architecture," Mr. Lucas said. "Basically all of Washington is a mimic of the past." We'll keep posted as to what the future holds.

Lucas Cultural Arts Museum And Two Others Make The Presidio's Cut [SocketSite]
3 Vie to Build Culture Center at Presidio in San Francisco [NYTimes]
George Lucas' Cultural Arts Museum Proposal And Personal Thoughts [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (25) | (email story)

September 13, 2013

CVS Seeks Permission To Open In Building Trader Joe's Abandoned

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While Trader Joe's had signed a tentative lease for the ground floor of 1285 Sutter Street which has since been dubbed "Etta," they opened at California and Hyde instead. And in two weeks, CVS’s application to open a 24-hour store in the 9,500 square foot retail space at the base of the new building at Sutter and Van Ness will be heard by San Francisco’s Planning Commission which will have to approve the formula retailer's plans.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

September 12, 2013

San Francisco's Future Skyline And Transit Center Fully Animated

The latest animation for San Francisco's future Transbay Transit Center in which the Center is fully rendered, both inside and out, not only includes the 1,070-foot tall Transbay Tower to rise at the corner of First and Mission, but twenty-three other area developments and two parks which are either under construction, approved or slated to be built.

The full list, links and breakdown for all the new developments which make an appearance above:

1. 50 First Street (Office/Residential)
2. 201 Folsom Street (LUMINA) (Residential/Retail)
3. 530 Folsom Street (Rene Cazenave Apartments)
4. Foundry Square III (Office)
5. 181 Fremont Street (Office/Residential)
6. 325 Fremont Street (Residential)
7. 340 Fremont Street (Residential)
8. 399 Fremont Street (Residential)
9. 75 Howard Street (Residential)
10. 524 Howard Street (Residential)
11. 45 Lansing Street (Residential)
12. 350 Mission Street (Office)
13. 535 Mission Street (Office)
14. One Rincon Tower 2 (Residential)
15. Oscar Park (Park)
16. 222 Second Street (Office)
17. 41 Tehama Street (Residential)
18. Transbay Block 1 (Residential)
19. Transbay Blocks 2/3/4 (current Temporary Terminal) (Residential and Park)
20. Transbay Block 5 (TBD)
21. Transbay Block 6/7 (Residential/Retail)
23. Tranbay Block 8 (Residential)
24. Transbay Block 9 (Residential)

And yes, there are more to come.

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SoMa Lot Across From The Eagle Acquired For Development

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The half-acre parking lot at 1532 Harrison Street which fronts Norfolk, Harrison and 12th Streets has been acquired by developer Build Inc. with plans to build around 120 rental units on the site.

The parcel which sits across the street from the Eagle Tavern is zoned for a building up to 65 feet in height with the potential for five stories of housing over ground floor retail.

Build Inc. acquires SoMa site for rental housing [Business Times]

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September 11, 2013

Oh Lord, Plans To Condo Convert The Second Church of Christ

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As proposed, the Second Church of Christ which overlooks Mission Dolores Park at 651 Dolores Street will be converted into a 26,000 square foot residential building, with four big three-bedroom units and a four car garage within the church's existing exterior walls (click plans to enlarge).

New partition walls within the existing auditorium would divide the space between three of the new dwelling units:

An all new penthouse level would be created by raising the suspending ceiling by seven feet and adding a new 3,020 square foot floor beneath the dome.

Outside, the "SECOND CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST" metal signage facing Dolores Street would be replaced with in-kind lettering to state: "THE LIGHT HOUSE."

In 2006, a plan to raze the church which was designed by architect William H Crim Jr. and built in 1917 had been drafted but was never approved with designs for a smaller church and eight new dwelling units to be built on the site instead.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

September 10, 2013

Lines For A Slender Nine-Story Building Have Been Drawn

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The Viavi Building at 50 Fell Street was built in 1931. Embodying "the distinctive characteristics of late period Mission Revival style," the historically significant L-shaped building was constructed around a spacious central courtyard with the only street side garden in the neighborhood.

Last occupied by the New College of California School of Law which vacated the building in 2008, the building was sold in 2011 and the buyer quietly engaged Heller Manus Architects to explore designs for the development of the property.

While the architects' plans call for the renovation of the existing building, plans for a slender nine or ten-story residential building to rise upon the western portion of the aforementioned courtyard have been drawn as well:

The project sponsor’s "preferred" option would construct a nine-story, 22,201 square foot residential building with a 1,477 square foot restaurant on the ground floor. Floors two through nine would include 24 residential units with a unit mix of six studio, six one‐bedroom and 12 two‐bedroom units. The preferred option includes 1,128 square feet of rooftop common open space.
Option A would construct a ten-story, 22,232 square foot residential building with a 1,334 square foot restaurant on the ground floor. Floors two through ten would include 23 residential units. Option A would include 1,104 square feet of rooftop common open space. Under Option A, the unit mix would include ten studio, nine one-bedroom and four two-bedroom units.
Under both options the proposed building would be 96 feet tall and no off‐street parking would be provided.

The Planning Department, however, isn't digging the plans for the predominantly glass building that's being proposed for the site:

The challenge of this site is arriving at a design of a tall slender building that must be compatible with the existing site and building. The design will need to demonstrate compatibility with the historic setting and building at 50 Fell Street. This building may succeed at providing a graceful transition between the 400’ tower to the West and the existing low‐rise Mediterranean style historic building at 50 Fell Street.
In general the siting is appropriate. However, as proposed, the current design would reduce public visibility from the street toward the historic building by blocking or leaving only a narrow setback between the new and the old. The Planning Department recommends reconsideration of the massing of the building to preserve visual setting of the historic building by providing more separation between the existing building and the proposed building. The Planning Department would like to see the proposed building more integrated with the courtyard in materiality, scale, proportion, and modularity. The new building must ‘finish’ the courtyard in a manner compatible with the historic site.

In terms of integration and compatibility, the Planning Department is recommending the existing scrolled courtyard entrance serve as the main entrance leading to any new building, is requesting that the existing courtyard wall and fountain remain in their original locations, and has even noted that "existing trees may be significant and contribute to the character of the courtyard and any removal will require review and approval."

In addition, rather than a glass, steel, and concrete building, the Department would like to see "some uniformity of detail, scale, proportion, texture, materials, color and building form" with the existing building which is "characterized by a light colored stucco body with punched window and door openings, and accented by Spanish tile, and other ornamental details."

We'll let you know when there's a rendering to be had.

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San Francisco Studio Sells For $1,600 Per Legal Square Foot

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The sale of the Book Concern Building's unit #505 at 83 Mcallister Street has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $415,000, five percent under asking. And with 259 legal square feet, call it $1,602 per legal square foot for the well designed Civic Center studio.

That being said, the legal square footage of the condo doesn’t include the 150 square foot sleeping loft which is technically "storage" space accessed by way of the custom installed spiral staircase.

And while the sale of the studio for $415,000 may seem crazy, keep in mind that the condo was first listed for sale for $417,000 back in 2006 which was before its award winning makeover.

83%20McAllister%20%23505%20Loft.jpg

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September 9, 2013

Impact Of Proposed 31-Story Waterfront Tower Up In The Air

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The environmental impact of razing the eight-story parking garage for 540 cars at 75 Howard Street and building a 31-story tower with 186 condos over a ground floor restaurant and parking for 175 cars on the site will be reviewed by San Francisco’s Planning Commission this week.

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Currently zoned for building up to 200 feet in height, assuming the Environmental Impact Report for the project is certified, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors will still need to approve a reclassification of the zoning for the tower to rise the full 348-feet as proposed.

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Chopping the tower down to 200 feet would reduce the number of units by ten percent to 169 condos with 143 parking spaces, while designs for a 281-foot tower would yield 172 units with parking for 156, leading to some to wonder if the designs for a 348-foot tall tower were proposed to make the approval of a shorter tower seem like a compromise.

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As the proposed tower would cast a shadow on Rincon Park, should the homeowners at the Four Seasons be successful in passing their "let the sun shine" ballot measure, in addition to San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, the voters of San Francisco would need to approve the plans for 75 Howard Street before any development could begin.

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New Homes, Not A Park, Likely To Rise On Decaying Portola Block

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Owned by the Garibaldi family since the 1920's, while some neighbors had been hoping the Portola neighborhood land upon which the decaying greenhouses of the old University Mound Nursery sit would be turned into a public park, the entire 2.2 acre block is now on the market for $12 million.

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As zoned, the San Francisco block which is bounded by Woolsey, Hamilton, Wayland, and Bowdoin streets and is adjacent to the University Mound reservoir could support the development of up to 34 new single family homes with heights of up to 40 feet.

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September 6, 2013

Royally Unexpected Architecture Redux

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On the market for $2,195,000 in 2009, the designer Royal Towers unit #203 sold for $2,175,000 that December.

1750 Taylor #203: Living

As we noted at the time, while the modern interior by Louise Mann might not be for everyone, the sweeping views of San Francisco most likely are:

1750 Taylor #203: Kitchen and View

And while not yet listed, the two-bedroom with two baths and two parking spaces is back on the market and seeking $2,995,000.

∙ Listing: 1750 Taylor Street #203 (2/2) - $2,995,000 [sfproperties.com]
Royally Unexpected Architecture, Design & Views: 1750 Taylor #203 [SocketSite]

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The Plan To Revive One Ferry Plaza

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With plans to expand and improve San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal in the works and Sinbad's days numbered, a number of readers have wondered what's to happen to One Ferry Plaza, the 18,300 square foot waterfront building behind the Ferry Building. We now have the answer.

According to the Business Times, the Tom family which is a little more than halfway through their 66-year master lease for the former World Trade Club building has engaged Kidder Mathews to market the property, seeking to attract "a major international restaurateur that could do north of $20 million in annual sales."

One Ferry Plaza is currently subleased to a Thai restaurant on a month-to-month basis.

The Plans To Expand San Francisco's Ferry Terminal And Service [SocketSite]
Wanted: $20 million waterfront restaurant behind Ferry Building [Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

September 3, 2013

Growing Pains And Gouging For Electric Vehicles In Mission Bay

When Bosa built the Madrone down in Mission Bay, five electric vehicle (EV) charging stations with two plugs each were installed in the building’s garage for a total of ten potential parking spaces from which EV's, such as a Tesla, can be charged.

While the ten spaces for EV's were a selling point for Bosa’s sales team, they’re now a point of contention amongst some of those who bought. And while the charging stations were originally free to use they are no longer, and the cost of charging an electric vehicle in the building can now be more expensive than an equivalent tank of gas.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, San Francisco households paid an average of $0.228 per kWh for electricity in July. Madrone’s charging stations have been set to charge $1.25 per kWh, around five times the going rate and a rate at which it cost one reader around $80 to fully charge, a cost which is greater than an equivalent amount of gas on a cost per mile basis.

At the same time, there's a battle brewing over even being able to access the building's well-located charging spots. While a number of the coveted spots were originally assigned to owners without electric vehicles, the building's bylaws specified that the spots could be reassigned to owners of electric vehicles as needed. Now that they're needed, however, a number of non-electric vehicle owners have threatened legal action should their coveted spaces be reassigned and their parking space moved.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (33) | (email story)

Four Seasons Homeowners File Suit To Block Approved Tower

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While residents of the Four Seasons Residences continue to move forward with a ballot measure designed to block the approved development of Millennium Partners' 510-foot tall condo tower and Mexican Museum to rise at 706 Mission Street, a development which would block their million dollar views, they've now filed a lawsuit challenging the development as well.

Filed in Sacramento Superior Court, the suit alleges San Francisco’s Planning Department failed to include all the information "necessary for informed decision-making and informed public participation," failed to fully evaluate the "effectiveness of mitigation measures to reduce the Project’s significant environmental impacts," and that San Francisco’s Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors failed to fully comply with the California Environmental Quality Act when approving the project.

An Unfriendly Ultimatum "So The Sun Can Shine" In San Francisco [SocketSite]
Four Seasons homeowners sue to block nearby Mexican Museum tower [Business Times]

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August 27, 2013

Apple's Revised Designs For A Flagship Store On Union Square

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While Ruth Asawa's San Francisco Fountain will still be moved to make way for Apple's proposed flagship store on Union Square, it won't be moved off-site if the revised designs for Apple's store and the plaza behind are approved.

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Instead, the fountain will be moved "slightly to the north and closer to the sidewalk" while the north edge of the existing plaza "will be pulled back several feet from the sidewalk to improve views of the fountain from the sidewalk."

From John King with respect to the revised design for Apple's proposed new store:

The building itself remains a tall, taut cube of glass and steel entered on Post Street. But instead of Stockton Street being walled off by steel panels 80 feet long and more than 20 feet high, the design includes an 8-foot-wide glass "window" that will be notched deep into the wall and extend from the floor to the roof. It then will continue across to create a skylight for the retail space below.
The thrust of the new design remains more about Apple than the historic Union Square setting. But the glass wall on Post has been pulled back several feet from the outer metal frame, allowing for shadows and depth. The broad, tall cut along Stockton adds a provocative and visually porous element to the scene.

The building design which Apple had originally proposed for the site:

Apple%20Store%20Union%20Square.jpg

And once again, as the corner currently appears:

300 Post Street

Apple's Plan For A Flagship Store On Union Square [SocketSite]
Apple Store's new design preserves fountain [SFGate]

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August 22, 2013

New Rents Over Religion On 14th Street

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With ten apartments on the top two floors and the ground floor and basement currently occupied by a church, the owner of the three-story building on the northwest corner of 14th and Belcher streets is working on plans to move the church to the basement, convert the first floor of the building into five new apartments, and build two new floors with four new apartments above the existing single story at the rear of the building.

The building's existing single-space garage and loading zone along 14th Street would be removed as part of the project and parking for bikes would be built in the basement.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

August 21, 2013

Let's Get Ready To Rubble For This 52-Story Tower To Rise

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As we first reported earlier this year:

Having acquired the Transbay parcel and approved plans to build a 52-story tower with 14 floors of condos over 400,000 square feet of office space and a spire reaching 800 feet, Silicon Valley builder Jay Paul plans to break ground on 181 Fremont as soon as possible.
While many have seen the renderings, for the first time we're publicly serving up the animation for the new tower which was filmed by steelblue for the Jay Paul Company. And yes, RocketSpace will soon need to find a new home.

Permits to demolish the buildings on the parcel at 181 Fremont have been issued and the Town Hall adjacent site upon which the 52-story tower will rise has been cordoned off.

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August 20, 2013

Two Proposals To Redevelop Pier 38, Including A Beer Garden

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The Port of San Francisco has received two responses to their request for proposals to redevelop San Francisco's Pier 38 bulkhead structure and a portion of the Pier 38 shed. The Pier 38 buildings were red tagged as unsafe for occupancy in 2011 when serving as office space for a number of startups and a couple of venture firms.

From the San Francisco Business Times with respect to the two competing proposals from San Francisco Waterfront Partners (SFWP) and TMG:

SFWP has proposed to use the first floor of the bulkhead building for a cafe and other restaurant uses, and the second floor for a technology co-working facility, perhaps operated by SoMa Central, which ran the tech incubator space prior to 2011. SFPW is also in talks with the Slanted Door Restaurant Group for creation of an Asian casual cafe and is proposing a San Francisco Beer Garden on the northside of the bulkhead building, facing the new Brannan Street Wharf.
TMG’s vision is based on "immediate revitalization of the Pier 38 Bulkhead with a mix of public, office, and maritime uses." The TMG proposal, which would cost $6.9 million, is focused on speed. TMG would limit its initial investment to meet accessibility and code requirements to activate the bulkhead building as quickly as possible.
The southern portion of the bulkhead building's first floor and the west portion of the mezzanine area would be used for office. The northern portion of the bulkhead building’s first floor could be used as an informal dining area, including an area for a food truck program. TMG has been in talks with several of the former tenants of the building as well as food truck organizer Off The Grid.

Port staff are slated to recommend a winning proposal to the Port Commission next month.

Putting Lipstick On The Red-Tagged Pig Of Pier 38? [SocketSite]
Two years after evictions, who's in the running to revive Pier 38 [Business Times]

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Demolition Of Derelict Pagoda Theater Is Underway

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The demolition of the derelict North Beach Pagoda Theater is underway.

Once the theater is demolished, a shaft to extract the boring machines for San Francisco's Central Subway project will be constructed upon the site which MUNI has leased for two years at $131,250 per month.

And once the machines are extracted and the shaft is closed, construction of The Palace at Washington Square, a five-story building with 18 dwelling units over a 4,700 square foot restaurant and parking for 27 cars, but no new North Beach Subway station, is slated to commence.

Pagoda Theater Rendering 2010

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August 19, 2013

Before And After Atop Nob Hill (And Reduced)

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When purchased for $945,000 in 2010, unit #902 atop the Francesca at 850 Powell Street looked rather different than it does now (above). The dining room and kitchen before:

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The living room before and after:

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And an iron and walnut bar, rather than wall, now divides the two.

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Listed for $2,300,000 this past March, the price for the 1,912 square foot Nob Hill condo has been reduced to $1,995,000. And yes, the rest of the condo has been remodeled as well.

∙ Listing: 850 Powell Street #902 (2/2.5) 1,912 sqft - $1,995,000 [850powell902.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

August 16, 2013

Two Months Later And Three Grand More For A Parking Space In SF

While parking spot #142 at 88 Townsend sold for $82,000 in June, the sale of spot #140 closed escrow yesterday with a reported contact price of $85,000.

As we noted yesterday, parking spots at 300 Ivy were priced at $75,000 a piece over in Hayes Valley.

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | (email story)

August 15, 2013

Making The Most Of 520 Square Feet

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Purchased in need of work for $262,500 in 2004, the work has been done to the 520 square foot Hamilton building studio #1406 with a deconstructed wall between the alcove and living area and an open kitchen with concrete countertops under which the refrigerator has been stashed:

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Back on the market and listed for $419,000, the bathroom has been worked on as well.

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∙ Listing: 631 O’farrell #1406 (0/1) 520 sqft - $419,000 [Herth via Redfin]
Life At The Hamilton (631 O'Farrell): A Plugged-In Reader's Report [SocketSite]

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Square On Track For Move To Market Street In September

1455 Market Street

Square will begin their move to Market Street next month, with a lease for 150,000 square feet across four of the twenty-two floors at 1455 Market Street between 10th and 11th. It's enough space to grow from 600 to 1,000 workers, with options to double the size.

The new space will have the obligatory glass conference rooms and open floor plan, with a block-long common area on the sixth floor.

Yahoo is taking over Square's current space in the Chronicle complex which is slated to be demolished in five years.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

August 13, 2013

Razing Ginsberg's To Build A Non-Beat Hotel

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Constructed in 1906 and empty since Ginsberg's Dublin Pub vacated a few years ago, the owners of the one-story building on the northwest corner of Bay and Mason are working on plans to raze the building and build a boutique hotel on the site.

The proposed four-story hotel has been designed with 15 rooms with two roof decks for guests. No parking would be provided on-site. And with a bit of retail space on the ground floor, the new building would rise a total of 40 feet in height.

Having been constructed over 50 years ago, a Historic Resource Evaluation will need to be prepared for the existing building at 400 Bay before it may be razed. And of course, there's always a chance a neighbor or two might Howl.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

August 9, 2013

Randy Rooster's Castro Street Plans Have Been Plucked

400 Castro Street

The investment group which had grand plans to open a "Randy Rooster" burlesque club in the Castro has withdrawn their $7.7 million offer for the old Bank of America building at 400 Castro Street and the group appears to have abandoned their plans to open a club.

According to the Bay Area Reporter, the investment group's chief operating officer's cell phone has been disconnected, an email to the group's spokeswoman resulted in a message that she was out of the office until next week, and the spokeswoman's associate did not respond to their inquiry.

A sales associate for Colliers International did respond, however, noting that the 400 Castro Street building is back on the market or available for lease, the rent for which is negotiable.

While The Rumor Mill Was Grinding Away, No Strip Club On Castro [SocketSite]
SF gay burlesque club drops plans to buy Castro building [ebar.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

Six Months Later And Ninety-One Grand More?

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In early 2008, the 1,146 square foot southeast corner condo on the 18th floor of the 22-story SOMA Grand was first purchased for $1,160,000. Six months ago, 1160 Mission Street #1806 resold for $1,198,000. And today, the two-bedroom hit the market listed for $1,289,000.

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As plugged-in people know, the building’s homeowners association filed suit against the building’s developer, builder, and architects three months ago which is why the "pending litigation" box was checked on the listing, so check with your lender if you're interested in the building.

1160%20Mission%20%231806%20Kitchen.jpg

∙ Listing: 1160 Mission Street #1806 (2/2) - $1,298,000 [Zephyr]
SOMA Grand Homeowners Follow And File Suit [SocketSite]

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Designs For Two Dogpatch Buildings And A Decompression Plaza

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Having quietly acquired the Dogpatch parcel upon which Café Cocomo currently stands, Build Inc. is moving forward with plans to build 120 new apartments and a cafe at 650 Indiana Street.

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A mid-block alley would sit between the two proposed five-story buildings designed by two different architects, providing access to underground parking for 85 cars and 120 bikes.

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And at the southern end of the development, the dead end spur of 19th Street would become a 8,900 square foot public art space, the proposed "Decompression Plaza."

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If all goes as planned, the site should be approved for development by early 2014.

Café Cocomo's Dancing Days Are Numbered, Condos Coming Soon? [SocketSite]
Plans For 120 New Condos Where Café Cocomo Stands (Or Shakes) [SocketSite]
650 Indiana [Build Inc.]

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August 6, 2013

Plan To Convert San Francisco Design Center Building Pitched

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A plan to convert over two-thirds of the San Francisco Design Center building at 2 Henry Adams Street from showroom space to general office use has been pitched to Planning.

Zoned for Production, Distribution & Repair (PDR), the conversion of the building to office use is not allowed by San Francisco’s Planning Code as of right. In fact, the conversion flies in the face of a key objective of San Francisco’s Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan which seeks to preserve the supply of PDR space within the district.

Another key objective of the Showplace Square/Potrero Hill Area Plan, however, is to ensure the economic viability of historically significant buildings, providing an exception for the conversion of such buildings to office use. And as such, the owners of 2 Henry Adams are planning to seek a Landmark Designation for the building which would clear the way for its conversion.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

San Francisco Fountain Sculptor Ruth Asawa Has Died

Sculptor Ruth Asawa passed away last night at the age of 87. The survival of Asawa’s San Francisco Fountain, a fixture of the Grand Hyatt Plaza, had been threatened by Apple’s proposed plans for a Union Square store, plans Apple has since been forced to revisit.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

August 5, 2013

Strand Renovation Set For September Start, Reopening In 2015

The Strand Theater

With permits in place, ACT's renovation of the old Strand Theater at 1127 Market Street is slated to get started this September, re-opening in January 2015.

Strand%20Theater%20Rendering.jpg

And as we first reported last week, MacFarlane Partners is moving forward with plans for a 12-story building with 150 apartments on the vacant lot next door.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

38 Brand New Apartments In San Francisco Renting For A Grand!

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While the going price for a new studio apartment in San Francisco is averaging over $2,300 a month, and NEMA’s model unit would rent for closer to $2,500, twenty-two of the brand new studios in the luxury building at the corner of Market and Tenth will be rented for $939 a month and sixteen one-bedrooms will be rented for $1,066.

So what’s the catch? As part of the Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development Below Market Rate (BMR) Rental Program, applicants for the 38 BMR units cannot make more than 55 percent of the area median income, which means a single person can make no more than $38,950 a year, a couple can make no more than $44,500.

Other restrictions for the 38 below market rate mid-market units include a credit score of at least 600; no record of a previous eviction for the applicants; and the ability to pass a federal background check. And while the maximum income for a single person is $38,950 a year, the minimum income is $28,170.

Applications are due by 5pm on August 30, 2013. Pass it along.

Average Rent For A Studio In San Francisco: Over $2,300 A Month [SocketSite]
Your First Real Peek Inside NEMA At Market And Tenth [SocketSite]
NEMA (18 10th Street) Below Market Rate Apartment Program [sf-moh.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

August 1, 2013

Yahoo! Inks Lease For Chronicle Space And San Francisco Team

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Yahoo! has officially inked a lease for the Chronicle building space at Fifth and Mission which Square will be vacating in September and to which Yahoo! plans to move their San Francisco team later this year.

In the process of "designing a cool, fun and beautiful space to inspire collaboration and innovation," Yahoo’s office will include the requisite onsite food service and game room.

Technically within the old Examiner Building at 110 Fifth Street which is connected to the Chronicle Building by a pedestrian bridge over Minna, the space into which Yahoo! is moving is slated to demolished in 2018 as part of Forrest City’s massive 5M Project.

With over a million new square feet of office space, 750 new dwelling units, and 150,000 square feet of ground floor retail planned as part of the 5M Project, there will be plenty of options for Yahoo! to move and expand, a discussion that's already in the works.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

July 29, 2013

Yahoo Circling Square's Chronicle Building Space

With Square moving six blocks away to 1455 Market between Tenth and Eleventh in September, Yahoo is reportedly close to signing a lease for Square’s current digs in the Chronicle Building at Fifth and Mission.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

Transbay Transit Center Changes: More Than Skin Deep

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With San Francisco’s Transbay Transit Center project running a projected $300 million over budget, proposed changes to the Transit Center's design are more than skin deep.

In addition to the Center’s new perforated aluminum skin which will employ a Penrose pattern and be coated in white epoxy flecked with mica for bits of sheen, a new café on the west end of the transit center's rooftop park seems to be growing in size as consultants "see a potential revenue source and dining hot spot."

Transbay Center Project Running $300 Million Over Budget [SocketSite]
Rising Construction Costs Getting Under The Transbay Center's Skin [SocketSite]
New skin, rooftop cafe alter Transbay Center plan [Chronicle]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

July 25, 2013

Transbay Center Project Running $300 Million Over Budget

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The projected cost of construction for the first phase of San Francisco’s Transbay Transit Center has risen from $1.6 billion to $1.9 billion. In order to cover the $300 million increase, the Transbay Joint Powers Authority plans to divert a portion of the funds which had been dedicated to the second phase of the project, the extension of track for Caltrain and High Speed Rail from Fourth and King to the Transbay Center at First and Mission:

Proposed Transbay Terminal Rail Extension

The Transbay Transit Center project which was first budgeted to cost closer to $1.2 billion back in 2007 is scheduled to open in 2017, but without the rail extension in place.

Transbay Center Plans: Revised, Refined, And Unveiled [SocketSite]
Transbay project in $300 million hole [SFGate]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (67) | (email story)

Rincon Hill’s New Public Green And Play Area: Announcing Emerald Park

Rincon%20Green.jpg

This afternoon, Rincon Hill will officially gain a new half-acre public park as the Emerald Fund will permanently relinquish its development rights to the open space in front of Rincon Green at 333 Harrison, the green will be renamed Emerald Park.

While the Emerald Fund will continue to fund the maintenance and upkeep, the San Francisco Parks Alliance will act as steward of the park. In addition, a children’s play area which was part of the original park design will be completed by the end of the year.

Rincon Hill Park Plan

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

July 24, 2013

A Bit Of Local Love That's About To Be Lost

Recently commissioned to paint for a European pop star whom shall not be named, up and coming local artist Casey O'Connell’s mural The Space Between currently adorns the side of a Glen Park house on Lippard Avenue, a glimpse of which can be caught from the street.

According to a plugged-in tipster, while "Casey paints love," the owners of the home are preparing to paint over the piece. So if you'd love to pay your respects, now is the time.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

July 23, 2013

Take Two For 1450 Franklin: 13 Stories And 69 Condos On The Way

1450 Franklin

Designed by Frederick Meyer and most recently home to Cars Dawydiak, in 2008 the proposed demolition of the two-story building at 1450 Franklin Street survived an appeal for preservation and the construction of a 13-story mixed-use building with 69 condominiums over parking and ground floor commercial space on the site was approved. And then the market tanked.

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With the demolition and building permits for the project having been reinstated, it’s a plugged-in reader that notes the site has been cordoned off, the site is being prepared for demolition, and the delayed development at 1450 Franklin Street is underway.

1450 Franklin: The Proposal And "Historic" Preservationist Challenge [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

July 19, 2013

Commission Slated To Certify Mercy's Impact On Sixth Street

200 6th Street Rendering (www.SocketSite.com)

Two weeks from now, San Francisco’s Planning Commission is slated to certify the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for Mercy Housing to move forward with their plans to build a nine-story residential building with 67 affordable housing units on the corner of 6th and Howard streets, razing the Hugo Hotel and canvas from which Defenestration’s flying furniture has hung for years.

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The burned-out Hugo Hotel was acquired by San Francisco's Redevelopment Agency by way of eminent domain for $4.6 million back in 2009 while the owners of the building, which has been sitting vacant for nearly two decades, had been holding out for $7,000,000.

Defenestration

Assuming certification of the EIR, approval hearings for the project will soon follow. And assuming the project is approved and any appeals fail, the destruction of the Hugo Hotel will commence post haste and Mercy's $19 million project will take an estimated 20 months to complete.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

July 17, 2013

An Unfriendly Ultimatum "So The Sun Can Shine" In San Francisco

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As we reported in May:

With San Francisco’s Planning Commission having cleared the way for Millennium Partners' proposed 706 Mission Street condo tower and Mexican Museum to rise up to 510 feet, 40 feet fewer than originally proposed, a group of homeowners from the adjacent Four Seasons Residences are preparing a ballot measure in an attempt to either block or significantly shorten the proposed building.
According to the San Francisco Business Times, the ballot measure being drafted by "The Friends of Yerba Buena" would attempt to strengthen the existing Proposition K which limits the casting of net new shadows on city parks but currently allows city commissions leeway in deciding whether or not a new building’s shadows should be allowed.
The proposed 706 Mission Street tower would cast a bit of new morning shadow upon San Francisco’s Union Square, but the City’s Recreation and Park Commission agreed to exempt the tower from the restrictions of Proposition K, ruling that the impact of the new shadows would not be adverse to the use of the park.
Taking exception to accusations that they're simply trying to protect their views, the group of homeowners claim not to be opposed to the new tower, simply to its impact on Union Square, and would apparently support the tower if it only rose to 351 feet in height.
The Four Seasons is 430 feet tall.

Unless Millennium Partners meets The Friends' demands by early next week, The Friends say they will move forward with their "let the sun shine on our parks" ballot measure "which would prohibit buildings over 40 feet tall that cast shadows on parks, unless approved by voters on a citywide ballot," a measure which would impact dozens of other developments in San Francisco.

According to the Business Times, former Supervisor Aaron Peskin will lead the ballot referendum for The Friends. And in related news, the list price for the The Penultimate Four Seasons Pad (765 Market Street #27A) has just been reduced $500,000, now asking $7,900,000.

Four Seasons' Homeowners Drop The Dreaded "B" Word [SocketSite]
Four Seasons owners give ultimatum in Mexican Museum height fight [Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (81) | (email story)

July 15, 2013

The Aliotos' Towering Mansion Sells For Millions Under Asking, But Fifty-Two Times Their Purchase Price

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Having hit the market asking $16,500,000 this past March, the list price for the Aliotos' Pacific Heights home at 2898 Vallejo Street was reduced to $13,900,000 in April.

This afternoon, the sale of 2898 Vallejo closed escrow with a reported contract price of $11,750,000, roughly two million "under asking," closer to five million under original list.

As we first reported earlier this year, Frank and Frances Alioto purchased the 9,500 square foot home in 1973 for $225,000 following its use in the filming of The Towering Inferno, serving as the mansion for Richard Chamberlain’s character, the cheapskate electrical engineer who cut corners and was to blame for the tower's fire.

With a tax basis of $439,219 thanks to Proposition 13, the total property tax bill for 2898 Vallejo was $5,205 in 2011. The property tax bill for the new buyers should now be closer to $137,369 per year.

And in terms of the average annual appreciation for the property, call it an effective 10 percent per year over the past 40 years.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (47) | (email story)

From Rendering To Reality On Folsom, New Plaza Up Next

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Slated to re-open later this year with Riverbed Technology and Macys.com as anchor tenants, the re-skinning and rebuilding of 680 Folsom Street which kicked off early last year and topped out this past October is nearly complete.

680 Folsom Rendering

The project will yield 505,000 square feet of office space with a new public plaza and 15,000-square-foot retail or cultural building to be built at the corner of Folsom and Third.

As the corner and 680 Folsom Street previously appeared:

680/690 Folsom

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

July 12, 2013

CPMC's Cathedral Hill Campus Cleared For Construction

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Approved by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors earlier this week, Mayor Lee has signed the bill that allows CPMC to move forward with the demolition of the Cathedral Hill Hotel and the building of CPMC's 12-story Cathedral Hill Hospital and Medical Office Building.

The bill clears the way for the rebuilding and expansion of CPMC's St. Luke's campus as well.

CPMC%20St%20Lukes%20MOB%20Rendered%202013.jpg

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

July 10, 2013

The Big Dollars Behind The 8 Washington Street Battle To Date

As of last month, No Wall on The Waterfront had raised $234,000 and spent $104,000 in their campaign to block the approved development of 8 Washington Street at the ballot box.

In addition, Boston Properties, owner of 4 Embarcadero Center to the west of 8 Washington Street, has spent $125,750 to block the development, second only to the individual spending of Barbara Stewart whose Bay views would be blocked by the development as well.

At the same time, Open Up the Waterfront has raised $464,990 and spent $322,000 to promote a competing ballot measure which would allow for the development of 8 Washington Street, with Pacific Waterfront Partners (the developer) having contributed $214,990, Cahill Contractors (the builder) having contributed $150,000, and Skidmore Owings & Merrill (the designer) having contributed $100,000 to the campaign.

Boston Properties has spent $125,000 to kill 8 Washington [Business Times]
The Money And Motivation Behind The Anti-8 Washington Measure [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (27) | (email story)

Blooming Big Plans For San Francisco Flower Mart Site

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While the site of the two-story San Francisco Flower Mart complex is currently zoned for development up to 55 feet in height, as part of Planning’s Central Corridor Plan the parcel could be up-zoned for heights of up to 65 feet (the "Mid-Rise Alternative") or even 85 feet (the "High Rise Alternative").

That being said, with plans for a mid-rise residential development on the site having fallen through in 2005, an ambitious new plan to raze 46,000 square feet of the Flower Mart and build a pair of office buildings rising up to 160 feet at the corner of Sixth and Brannan has been drafted and quietly submitted to Planning for their reaction.

The proposed project would yield over 500,000 square feet of office space, 80,000 square feet for parking, and 16,000 square feet of ground floor retail on the 575 Sixth Street site with a nine-story building connected to an 11-story building by pedestrian bridges at the fifth and sixth levels.

The project would also include an extension of Morris Street from Bryant to Brannan via new a pedestrian walkway.

The Planning Department’s initial reaction to the project and proposed heights:

The proposed heights significantly exceed what is allowed under the current zoning. The proposed heights also significantly exceed what is envisioned in the proposed Central Corridor Plan area for this site. The basic urban form and land use principles of the draft Central Corridor Plan are for a predominant mid-rise (55-feet to 130-feet tall) district with large floor plate character combined with strategically located and widely-spaced slender towers near key transit stops, with heights tapering down to Western SoMa (i.e. toward Sixth Street). Building heights as proposed will need extensive shadow, view, skyline, and immediate context analysis to assess the appropriateness of their heights, bulk, and spacing.
The Planning Department recommends the height of the eastern most building not exceed 85 feet tall per the proposed height limits; the building wing to the west should be sculpted to step down to Sixth Street and should not exceed 65 feet in height.

The Department does, however, support the development of a publicly accessible mid-block alley connecting Brannan with Morris ("as wide as the Morris Street right-of-way") and "recommends preserving the possibility of accommodating a new alley connecting Sixth Street to Morris Street and any future alley network typical of SoMa blocks."

In order for the project to proceed as proposed, the Board of Supervisors would need to approve a Height District Reclassification for the subject parcel. As the Board approved an up-zoning for the development of 8 Washington, why not here as well?

Are The Big Plans For San Francisco's Central Corridor Big Enough? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (52) | (email story)

July 4, 2013

Fireworks For The Fourth (And Jack Balestreri)

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Jack Balestreri passed away at the ripe old age of 95 last year, a month before the 75th anniversary of the Golden Gate Bridge (as captured above by Marco Sanchez). Jack was believed to have been the last living survivor of those who built the bridge, having been hired in 1933 when he was only 17 years old.

Following his concrete work on the bridge's south tower and San Francisco anchorage, and paid for with his wages, Jack built the Carolina Street stairway aside his old home on Goat (a.k.a. Potrero) Hill, connecting the Carolina Street cul-de-sac with 20th Street.

Next week, a city ordinance naming and recognizing the Carolina Street stairway as "Jack Balestreri Way" takes a step closer to being approved and implemented.

Have a great and safe 4th of July and hopefully long weekend, we'll see you on the 8th.

Posted by socketadmin at 5:00 AM | Permalink | (email story)

July 3, 2013

More Dirt On Madrone

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With many having paid for million dollar views, a mini-revolt is brewing over at Madrone as residents are becoming increasingly frustrated with the state of the building's windows and appearance over in South Mission Bay.

While the building’s Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&R’s) dictate that Madrone’s windows are to be cleaned every May and October, the last cleaning occurred between November and January.

We've been told that bids to clean Madrone's windows have been received but the building's management team seems to be dragging their feet in getting a contract approved, suggesting that they might just wait until October to act despite the building's CC&Rs. In the meantime, dirt and dissatisfaction continue to build.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

June 28, 2013

Rising Shoreline Tides (And Barbeques) Down In South Beach?

41%20Federal%20%2323%20Kitchen.jpg

At 1,617 square feet, #23 is the largest of nine condos in the boutique South Beach building at 41 Federal named Shoreline. Purchased for $1,495,000 in 2007, with three bedrooms, two terraces, and one parking spot, 41 Federal #23 is back on the market and listed for $1,495,000 again.

41%20Federal%20%2323%20Living.jpg

And yes, you can barbeque on the back patio (although we’re guessing gas only).

41%20Federal%20%2323%20Patio.jpg

Early last year, the 1,365 square foot two-bedroom Shoreline condo #21 resold for $1,135,000, one percent below its purchase price of $1,150,000 in October of 2006.

∙ Listing: 41 Federal #23 (3/2) 1,617 sqft - $1,495,000 [mcguire.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

June 26, 2013

Hiding Behind The Façade Of A Historic Resource

Deemed a historic resource, the façade of 421 Arguello Boulevard was saved while the building behind was razed to make room for 8 new housing units to rise (click image to enlarge). It’s the same approach that’s being proposed for the six story project at 1335 Larkin Street.

We’ll let you debate the effectiveness of the approach and 421's execution.

An Ideal Location For Twenty New Condos To Rise [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (23) | (email story)

June 25, 2013

Bay Commission Votes To Oppose Warriors Arena Bill Without Delay

Having passed in the State Assembly by a vote of 59-10, Phil Ting’s Assembly Bill 1273 which would revise the existing authorization to develop San Francisco’s Pier 30-32 for use as a cruise ship terminal and authorize the Port to approve the building of the proposed Warriors Arena without additional review or oversight from the Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC) is now in the hands of the Senate.

Following a full-court press from the Mayor and local labor leaders last month, the BCDC agreed to avoid a formal vote opposing the bill and simply send a letter to legislators expressing their concerns about the attempted end run, giving the Warriors a month to work out their differences over the proposed arena project with the commission's staff.

Having failed to resolve their differences, the Commission has now formally voted 12-6 to "request that AB 1273 (The Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act) be placed on a two-year timetable so that it is not acted on by any Senate committee during this legislative year," or to formally oppose the bill should Assembly Member Ting decline the Commission's request to delay the legislation.

Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act Aims To Clear The Way For The Warriors [SocketSite]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]
Full-Court Press Postpones Bay Commission's Opposition To Arena Bill [SocketSite]
BCDC Letter to The Honorable Philip Y. Ting (Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act) [ca.gov]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (53) | (email story)

June 24, 2013

Sitting Pretty Atop The Brannan Down In South Beach

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As we wrote about the sale of 219 Brannan's penultimate penthouse #17D last month:

If the Warriors’ plans for Pier 30-32 and penthouses aren’t your cup of tea, you might want to look elsewhere. But if they are, you might take a peek at 219 Brannan #17D.
The 2,005 square foot three-bedroom unit features big Bay, Bridge, and downtown views from windows that reach from the eleven foot ceilings down to the blonde wood floors.
Purchased as new for $2,307,500 in 2001 and barely lived in since, 219 Brannan #17D is about to hit the market for $3,500,000 with parking for two and dues of $1,047 per month.
As plugged-in people know, the penthouse unit with the exact same floor plan one floor above (219 Brannan #18D) sold for $2,942,500 this past September having been purchased for $2,810,000 in August of 2005.

The sale of 219 Brannan #17D closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $3,625,000. Call it a little over $1,800 a square foot, fifty-seven percent over its 2001 sale price, and twenty-three percent over the price which was paid for the identical unit one floor above nine months ago.

Fancy The Warriors' Plans And Penthouse Views? [SocketSite]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]
A Million Dollars Under Dotcom Days For The Brannan's Penthouse [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

June 21, 2013

Living Large In 259 Legal Square Feet For $1,695 Per Foot

83%20McAllister%20%23505.jpg

Keep in mind that the listed 259 square feet of living space within the Book Concern Building’s unit #505 doesn’t include the 150 square foot sleeping loft which is technically "storage" space and accessed by way of a custom installed spiral staircase.

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And as such, with a list price of $439,000, the well designed 83 McAllister Street #505 has just been listed for $1,695 per square foot, which isn’t much more than the $1,610 per square foot ($417,000) at which the studio had first been listed back in 2006.

∙ Listing: 83 McAllister #505 (0/1) 259 sqft - $439,000 [via Redfin]
Book Concern Building (83 McAllister) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

The Chips Don’t Fall In Chipotle’s Favor: Request Denied

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Following the Planning Department’s reasoning and recommendation, San Francisco’s Planning Commission has denied Chipotle’s application to renovate and occupy the empty one-story building at 2100 Market Street, formerly home to "Home" which vacated the building in 2011.

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Keep in mind that the Commission’s rejection of Chipotle’s request was based on Chipotle being a formula retailer, not based on there being a better use for the Upper Market site which is zoned for development up to 65-feet in height.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (52) | (email story)

June 19, 2013

An Ideal Location For Twenty New Condos To Rise

1335%20Larkin%20Building.jpg

Plans to add six new stories over the Ideal Auto Rebuilders building at 1335 Larkin Street are on the boards and the Planning Department has quietly been consulted.

As proposed, the existing ground floor of the building would be used for a lobby and off-street parking for 20 cars while above the building 20 new dwelling units would be constructed. The finished building would rise up to 65 feet in height.

With a proposed setback of between 20 to 50 feet from the front of the building, the proposed addition "appears to retain the primary façade where most of the character-defining features of the building are found" in the opinion of the Planning Department, an important point as 1335 Larkin was identified as "possessing individual historic significance" in the Department's Automotive Support Structures Historic Resource Survey.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

Ferry Terminal Improvements: Function, Efficiency, And Visual Fit

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The proposed expansion and improvement of San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal includes three new berthing facilities, new covered passenger queuing areas, and a new public Embarcadero Plaza located between the Ferry and Agriculture buildings, infilling the existing lagoon (click to enlarge).

San Francisco’s Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) will hold a public meeting on the project and provide their comments on the proposed Ferry Terminal project this afternoon.

The HPC is slated to generally support the designs for the new Embarcadero Plaza and berthing facilities, but they’re not too keen on the proposed photovoltaic canopies, questioning their function, efficiency, and visual fit with the Ferry Building.

Ferry%20Terminal%20Canopy.jpg

The Commission's reaction and draft response to the proposed canopies, a position which should be formalized this afternoon:

The HPC concurs with the recommendations to refine the design of the new canopies and eliminate the canopy extending in front of the north façade of the Ferry Building. Overall, the HPC finds that the design of the new canopies should be refined to better relate to the adjacent historic resources and the surrounding historic district.
Specifically, the HPC questioned the function and efficiency of the new photovoltaic panels on the canopies given their location and orientation. Further, the HPC found that the new canopy design would not appear to sufficiently shield passengers from wind and rain, due to the current design’s height and upslope.
In addition, the HPC commented on the number of canopies and their impact upon the view of the Ferry Building and the San Francisco Bay. The HPC questioned the number of varying design expressions introduced into the area, which would be caused by the new photovoltaic canopies in combination with the existing East Bayside Promenade, entry portals to the new berthing facilities, and other existing site elements.
The HPC also requested additional information on the queue time for the various ferry terminals and the justification for permanent canopies. The HPC questioned whether the destinations with longer queues could be moved to one of the other berthing facilities with longer canopy elements. Ultimately, the HPC found that the current design is not compatible with the surrounding historic resources, and would impact the visual setting of the Ferry Building.

With seven new routes and ferry service from downtown San Francisco to Berkeley, Richmond, Treasure Island, Hercules, Martinez, Antioch and Redwood City planed to be introduced between 2014 and 2030, San Francisco's ferry terminal will serve a projected 32,000 riders per weekday by 2035, up from around 10,000 passengers across six ferry routes today.

The Plans To Expand San Francisco's Ferry Terminal And Service [SocketSite]
The Need And Numbers For San Francisco's Ferry Terminal Expansion [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

June 18, 2013

From Classrooms To Condos In Pacific Heights

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The University of the Pacific has sold its Dugoni School of Dentistry building at 2155 Webster Street to housing developer Trumark Urban. Trumark plans to redevelop the Pacific Heights building into 75 residential condominium units averaging 2,000 square feet a piece.

According to the Business Times, the Webster Street building will be reskinned with "a mix of glass and earthy materials" and eleven townhomes will be built upon the building's parking lot.

The Dugoni School of Dentistry will be moving to its rebuilt building at 155 Fifth Street.

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (28) | (email story)

Chipotle's Designs For Upper Market And Planning's Opposition

2100%20Market%20Street%20Site.jpg

This week, San Francisco’s Planning Commission is set to review and vote on Chipotle’s request to renovate and occupy the vacant one-story building at 2100 Market Street which was last occupied by the restaurant "Home" two years ago.

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The project would not increase the exterior dimensions of the existing building but would involve interior improvements and alterations to the building's facade.

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The project would create a 600 square‐foot outdoor patio to the west of the building where there is currently a partially enclosed storage area, screened from Market Street behind an eight foot high wall which Chipotle would adorn with a mural.

2100%20Market%20Street%20Plan.gif

Supporting Chipotle's project: The Merchants of Upper Market & Castro; the Castro/Upper Market Community Benefit District; 34 letters/emails from local merchants; 48 letters/emails from the public; a petition of support with 1,661 signatures; and an online petition with 433 signatures

Opposing Chipotle’s project: the Duboce Triangle Neighborhood Association; 10 letters/emails local merchants; 3 letters/emails from the public; a petition in opposition with 255 signatures; and an online petition with 773 signatures.

And the recommendation from San Francisco's Planning Department to the Commission: disapprove Chipotle’s request to renovate and occupy the former Home on Market Street as proposed.

The stated basis for the Planning Department’s recommendation:

There are currently 10 Formula Retail Uses that occupy commercial frontage within 300 feet of the project site that include Sterling Bank & Trust, Ace Hardware, Walgreens, Crossroads Trading, Good Feet, Safeway, Jamba Juice, Starbucks, GNC, and Mike’s Camera that occupy approximately 733.5 linear feet of commercial frontage within 300 feet of the project site, resulting in a formula retail concentration of approximately 27%. The proposed Chipotle would further increase the concentration formula retail to approximately 36% within 300 feet of the project site.
The Upper Market NCT is already well served by several nearby independently owned restaurants, Casa Mexicana at 180 Church, Taqueria El Castillito at 136 Church, and Chilango at 235 Church that already offer products that similar or identical to those offered by Chipotle.
The Project would be detrimental to the neighborhood by occupying a prominent corner lot with a formula retail use that uses standardized color schemes, decor and signage that will detract from the distinctive character of the Upper Market Neighborhood which includes primarily local, independent retail businesses.

Last month, San Francisco’s Planning Commission shot down Starbucks’ proposal to renovate and occupy the retail space at 2201 Market Street (in part based on the Planning Department’s concerns with respect to the concentration of formula retail in the area) but approved the application for CVS to renovate and occupy a long vacant retail space at 2280 Market Street, roughly 400 feet away from the proposed Starbucks.

Unmentioned by Planning, the potential for building up to 65-feet high on the 2100 Market site.

Starbucks' Market Street Plan Shot Down By Planning [SocketSite]
The Designs For 2201 Market Street And Great Starbucks Divide [SocketSite]
Planning For A CVS: The Designs For 2280 Market Street [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (77) | (email story)

June 17, 2013

Designs For Building Up On Brannan And Parking Going Down

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As a plugged-in reader noted when we first published the plans to build upon the 94 space parking lot at 345 Brannan Street, plans to raze the regularly filled parking lot and single-story building behind the lot at 270 Brannan on the other side of Second Street are also in the works.

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As proposed, an office building rising five and seven stories high with 172,000 square feet of space and parking for 12 cars will be constructed upon the Brannan Street site between the historic Hawley and Gallo buildings.

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Between the building's five-story facade along Brannan Street and its seven story height behind, a private 5,000 square foot atrium would sit (as could the building’s tenants):

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In addition to 12 parking spaces, a net loss of roughly 100 spaces for the site, the basement of the building would include parking for 33 bikes with adjacent showers and lockers.

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From the Planning Department with respect to the building’s proposed design and fit within San Francisco’s South End Landmark District:

270 Brannan Street is located in a mixed character area of the landmark district with examples of older brick warehouses with deeply recessed openings and newer reinforced concrete warehouses with steel‐sash windows. The proposed project addresses this mixed character area by directly referencing the adjacent historic resources, and by incorporating similar design elements, including a high proportion of mass to void, recessed fenestration, and a vertical façade orientation.
Along Brannan Street, the façade is organized to emphasis the vertical orientation as evidenced by the alternating bays of terracotta tile and fenestration and the reinforced concrete columns on the ground floor. In addition, this street façade provides for a seven‐inch setback between aluminum‐sash windows and the terracotta cladding, thus providing for a deep shadow line along the street façade.

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The proposed project is consistent and compatible with the district’s details, as evidenced by the proposed project’s façade organization and cornice articulation, which reference characteristics found within the South End Landmark District. The proposed project draws from the district’s typical warehouse façade design, as evidenced by the façade composition of base, shaft and cornice (Beaux‐Arts organization/form) and larger‐scale vehicular opening.
To reinforce the regularized tri‐partite composition, the Brannan Street façade includes a tall ground floor level with a heavy reinforced concrete belt course and three stories of alternating vertical bays of fenestration and terracotta tile capped by the simple painted metal angle cornice. The painted metal angle provides a contemporary and compatible interpretation of the district’s simple cornice lines. This façade organization references the organizational scheme of the later warehouses within the district, while still evoking the pilaster elements found within some of the district’s earlier brick warehouses.
As is common within larger district, the entryways feature additional detailing, including brick surrounds, smaller canopies and signage. The proposed project references the entryway details by providing for a simple projecting canopy, which denotes the project’s main entryway along Brannan Street.

San Francisco’s Architectural Review Committee (ARC) is slated to provide its thoughts on the building and its fit this week.

Parking Lot And Development Alert: The Designs For 345 Brannan [SocketSite]
San Francisco's Historic <1 Percent And Eleven Landmark Districts [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

June 14, 2013

Fear, Loathing, And Exaggerations Atop Cathedral Hill

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From the "SOS Cathedral Hill" site which implores its readers to "get the facts about the massive luxury condo [proposed] on Cathedral Hill" and join them "in the fight to protect our neighborhood":

New York Developer Adco Group wants to build a massive 30+ story, 400 foot tall luxury condo on Cathedral Hill that would be visible from much of the city. This proposal is nearly double the height of any existing building on Cathedral Hill and will stick out like a sore thumb.
This structure does not fit in our neighborhood. In fact, it will put the many seniors who live in our neighborhood at risk. The increased traffic on Post St. will make worse an already unsafe environment for pedestrians.
The project will endanger pedestrians and seniors, increase traffic and strain already limited MUNI resources. We just can’t afford the risk.

With respect to getting the facts straight, while ADCO’s proposed tower would be the tallest building on the block, at 416 feet it’s nowhere near "nearly double the height" of the existing Sequoias building which tops out at 396 feet next door.

SOS%20Cathedral%20Hill%20Site.jpg

And no, that's not One Rincon Hill in the rendering above (nor, unfortunately, is it the SOM design which had originally been drawn for the site).

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (32) | (email story)

June 13, 2013

Moving Quietly (And Quickly) With Plans To Raze Manor West

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The owner of the one-story building at 750 Harrison Street, between Third and Fourth streets with a frontage on Rizal as well, is quietly working on plans to raze the one-story commercial building on the site and build an 8-story building of up to 85-feet in its place.

Currently home to SoMa's Manor West nightclub, the early designs for the proposed 8-story building on the site include 77 Single Room Occupancy units averaging 375 square feet; 2,826 square feet of commercial space; a common 2,671 square foot landscaped roof deck for residents; and one parking spot.

Currently zoned for 85-feet, San Francisco's proposed Central Corridor Plan maintains the 85-foot height limit on the Harrison Street side of the 750 Harrison Street parcel but downzones the Rizal Street side to 45 feet "in order to reduce any net new potential for shadow on the Alice Street Community Garden" which is due north of the site.

The Central Corridor Plan is currently anticipated to be up for adoption in late 2014. Approvals for the proposed 750 Harrison Street project would be assessed based on the height districts in place at the time that the entitlement's to build are sought, hence the "quickly" above.

Are The Big Plans For San Francisco's Central Corridor Big Enough? [SocketSite]
Planning For A Projected 190,000 New Jobs In San Francisco By 2040 [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

June 12, 2013

Big Plans For A Little Parkside Parcel On Taraval

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While neighbors have yet to be notified, the owners of the Parkside parcel on the northwest corner of Taraval and 33nd Avenue are quietly testing the waters of Planning with designs to raze the existing 12-foot-tall, 960-square-foot auto shop at 2249 Taraval and build a 52-foot-tall, 18,000-square-foot building in its place.

Early designs for the building include seven dwelling units, 2,350 square feet of ground-floor retail, and eight off-street parking spaces which would be accessed from a curb cut along 33rd Avenue.

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (17) | (email story)

T-Minus Two Days Until Towering Folsom Street Development Begins

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The no parking signs for have been hung on the parking meters around the parking lot bounded by Folsom, Main, and Beale Streets, and on Friday, June 14, Tishman is slated to start preparing the site for the two big towers, 8-story midrises, and podium building to rise at 201 Folsom.

201 Folsom Street Site

Monthly parkers in the 390 Main Street lot which will be closed at the end of the day tomorrow (Thursday, June 13, 2013) will be getting pro-rated refunds which shouldn’t come as any surprise.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (40) | (email story)

June 11, 2013

The Dead Serious Designs For Miniature Golf In The Mission

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Formerly a mortuary, San Francisco’s Planning Commission approved the redevelopment of 1096 South Van Ness Avenue for use as a restaurant in 2005. And while some improvements for that project were completed, the restaurant never opened and the building sits vacant.

Tomorrow, the Planning Commission will vote on whether or not to allow Urban Putt’s proposal to open a 2,100 square foot miniature golf course, bar and restaurant in the building on the northwest corner of South Van Ness and 22nd Street to proceed.

Urban%20Putt%20Hole%207.gif

Early designs for the proposed eighteen-hole course include the Trans American Windmill and More Cowbell on hole number 13:

Urban%20Putt%20Hole%2013.gif

The restaurant and bar would be primarily located on the second floor, click the plans for the building to enlarge.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

June 10, 2013

The New Price For A Parking Spot In South Beach: $82,000

The sale of parking spot #142 at 88 Townsend Street which sold for $65,000 in early 2008 and again for $38,000 in October of 2011 has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $82,000 having been listed for $85,000 in April.

Once again, the spot can be used or leased by a resident or non-resident of the building. And with monthly dues of $32.76, call it a CAP Rate of roughly 4.6 percent for the spot assuming a monthly rent of $350 a month.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | (email story)

June 7, 2013

Trinity Place Watch: Timing, Destruction, And Design

Trinity Place Phase 3 Site

With the 418-unit Phase Two of Trinity Place at 1190 Mission Street now scheduling move-ins for August, Trinity Plaza (the old Del Webb Townhouse motel) has been reduced to rubble and the site for Trinity Place's 545-unit Phase Three along 8th Street is being prepared for construction.

Trinity%20Place%20Phase%201-3%20Rendering.jpg

As we first reported last year, the construction of Phase Two doesn't appear to support Arquitectonica's "holey" design as was originally proposed, a report that the new rendering above would appear to confirm.

Trinity%20Place%20Phases.jpg

Trinity Place Phase Two: Timing And Reality Check [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

In The Market For A Potrero Hill Compound?

2255%20Mariposa%20Street.jpg

Atop its corner perch at the corner of Mariposa and Utah, the former art school building at 2255 Mariposa Street was remodeled in 1987 and converted to legal dwelling units.

2255 Mariposa Living

With a 12,500 square foot lot, 6,645 square feet of buildings, and up to 30-foot ceilings in the main house, the Potrero Hill compound has just hit the market listed for $5,995,000.

2255%20Mariposa%20Top%20Floor.jpg

∙ Listing: 2255 Mariposa Street - $5,995,000 [thestonesf.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (16) | (email story)

June 4, 2013

CVS's Intense Plans For An Empty Building On 19th Avenue

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Built as an auto showroom, the 32,000 square foot building at the corner of 1900 19th Avenue and Ortega Street has sat empty since 2009 when the US Postal Service vacated, having used the building for a sorting facility for twenty-five years.

For the past two years, CVS has been working on plans to remodel, repurpose and convert the building into a formula retail store (click designs to enlarge).

The building’s loading dock would be converted to retail space, replaced by an on-street loading area along Ortega. Atop the building, a primary parking area would provide 31 parking spaces. A parking lot across the street would be used for accessory parking.

This week, San Francisco's Planning Commission will decided the store’s fate with the Planning Department recommending against the project. A plugged-in reader reports:

The planning staff have recommended disapproval of the project, presumably due to complaints from parents at the school across 19th Ave.
Ironically, a primary reason the staff oppose the location is that Noriega St. "includes four other pharmacies that are located a few blocks away", contradicting their rationale for allowing the [Market] Street location.
It's worth noting that CVS has been doing outreach for the last 2 years and many neighbors are supportive of the project.

While the Planning Department also argues that the "intensity" of the proposed store is out of scale with the small neighborhood commercial district and would "foreclose any opportunity for locally owned neighborhood oriented uses to be developed in the district," the project sponsor notes a national retailer is likely the only type of business capable of financing the development of the "white elephant" building and the existing commercial district "provides virtually no service whatsoever to the neighborhood at large."

If the proposal happens to be approved, CVS plans to file for a building permit as soon as possible with hopes of opening the store by the Spring of 2014.

1900 19th Avenue: CVS Proposal And Conditional Use Hearing [sfplanning.org]
Planning For A CVS: The Designs For 2280 Market Street [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (27) | (email story)

June 3, 2013

Open Up The Waterfront!

Open%20Up%20The%20Waterfront.jpg

The approved 8 Washington Street project would raze the existing Golden Gateway Tennis and Swim Club and adjacent Port of San Francisco owned parking lot and construct a 165-unit condo building rising up to 136 feet in height upon the site which was originally zoned for up to 84 feet. The development would also yield new retail, a fitness facility with outdoor pools, and 30,000 square feet of public open space, playgrounds, and parks.

8%20Washinton%202013.jpg

From the "Open up the Waterfront" website which backs a proposed "8 Washington Parks, Public Access and Housing Initiative" to uphold the upzoning for the 8 Washington site, the signature gatherers for which were on the sidewalks of San Francisco this past weekend:

The 8 Washington Parks, Public Access and Housing Initiative is a proposed city measure that, if approved by voters, will open the way for new public parks, increased access to The Embarcadero Waterfront, hundreds of construction jobs, new sustainable residential housing and funding for new affordable housing. And it empowers voters with the decision on how to best utilize our waterfront.
Currently the site at 8 Washington has a 1,735 foot fence — over five football fields long — that blocks public views and public access to the waterfront. Today, the is site is also defined by a 27,000 square foot asphalt parking lot, which draws toxins into our Bay waters and an exclusive private tennis club behind the massive fence.
In the event that this Initiative and any other [related] initiative are approved by the voters at the same election, and this initiative receives a greater number of affirmative votes than any other such measure or measures, this measure shall control in its entirety and the other measure or measures shall be rendered void and without any legal effect.

The Open up the Waterfront initiative is being paid for by "San Franciscans for Parks, Jobs and Housing" with major support from Pacific Waterfront Partners, the developer of the proposed 8 Washington Street Project.

Consider "Liking" this post in order to show your support for the proposed Open up the Waterfront ballot measure which will also register your vote in our informal poll.

And while there’s no "Dislike" button for those who oppose this proposed pro-8 Washington Street measure, there is a countermeasure for you to "Like" instead: No Wall On The Waterfront!

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (44) | (email story)

No Wall On The Waterfront!

No%20Wall%20on%20The%20Waterfront.jpg

The approved 8 Washington Street project would raze the existing Golden Gateway Tennis and Swim Club and adjacent Port of San Francisco owned parking lot and construct a 165-unit condo building rising up to 136 feet in height upon the site which was originally zoned for up to 84 feet. The development would also yield new retail, a fitness facility with outdoor pools, and 30,000 square feet of public open space, playgrounds, and parks.

8%20Washinton%202013.jpg

From the Sierra Club which opposes the 8 Washington Street development:

A coalition of environmental and neighborhood groups collected 31,000 signatures in less than 30 days last summer to ask voters whether they want to approve increased waterfront height limits to allow a high-rise luxury condo complex to be built at 8 Washington Street. The tower would be built on publicly owned waterfront land along the Embarcadero across from the Ferry Building and on an adjacent private lot that currently houses a well-used family recreation and sports center.
For decades the Sierra Club has worked for strict building height limits on San Francisco’s waterfront to keep it open for public use and enjoyment rather than blocked by a wall of high-rise towers, as has happened to public waterfronts in Miami, San Diego, and elsewhere.
The Club will be working throughout 2013 with a citywide coalition of neighborhood associations, waterfront businesses, and tenant groups called "No Wall on the Waterfront" to urge San Francisco voters to reject the 8 Washington waterfront height-limit increase on the Nov. 5 ballot.

As we first reported last year, the No Wall on the Waterfront initiative was funded in large part by a couple who live next to the 8 Washington site in a condo which was purchased for $2,400,000 with views over the tennis and swim club as one of its major selling points.

Consider "Liking" this post in order to show your support for the No Wall on the Waterfront ballot measure which will also register your vote in our informal poll.

And while there's no "Dislike" button for those who oppose this anti-8 Washington Street measure, there is a proposed countermeasure for you to "Like" instead: Open Up The Waterfront!

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

May 31, 2013

Four Seasons' Homeowners Drop The Dreaded "B" Word

706%20mission%202013%20Rendering%202.jpg

With San Francisco’s Planning Commission having cleared the way for Millennium Partners' proposed 706 Mission Street condo tower and Mexican Museum to rise up to 510 feet, 40 feet fewer than originally proposed, a group of homeowners from the adjacent Four Seasons Residences are preparing a ballot measure in an attempt to either block or significantly shorten the proposed building.

According to the San Francisco Business Times, the ballot measure being drafted by "The Friends of Yerba Buena" would attempt to strengthen the existing Proposition K which limits the casting of net new shadows on city parks but currently allows city commissions leeway in deciding whether or not a new building’s shadows should be allowed.

The proposed 706 Mission Street tower would cast a bit of new morning shadow upon San Francisco’s Union Square, but the City’s Recreation and Park Commission agreed to exempt the tower from the restrictions of Proposition K, ruling that the impact of the new shadows would not be adverse to the use of the park.

Taking exception to accusations that they're simply trying to protect their views, the group of homeowners claim not to be opposed to the new tower, simply to its impact on Union Square, and would apparently support the tower if it only rose to 351 feet in height.

The Four Seasons is 430 feet tall (click image below to enlarge):

Do keep in mind that the 706 Mission Street site is currently zoned for up to 400 feet but the Planning Commission is recommending an up-zoning for the parcel and that a strengthening of Proposition K to disallow any new shadowing of a park, regardless of severity, would apply to any new development in the city, not simply 706 Mission.

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (42) | (email story)

May 30, 2013

Mayor On Proposed Union Square Apple Store Plan: iSpoke Too Soon?

Grand%20Hyatt%20Plaza.jpg

Having admitted "we weren't necessarily focused on that side" with respect to how the proposed Union Square Apple store would affect the existing Grand Hyatt Plaza and Ruth Asawa fountain on the site, Mayor Ed Lee has said he'll now go visit the site in person to see whether the design he already deemed "quite simply incredible" might actually fit in.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (21) | (email story)

May 29, 2013

SOMA Grand Homeowners Follow And File Suit

SOMA Grand homeowners at 1160 Mission Street have just filed suit against the building’s developer, builder and architects claiming "construction defects and building standard violations," primarily stemming from common waterproofing issues.

The defects were identified by forensic architects and consultants retained by the homeowners association through counsel, The Miller Law Firm. The same law firm has filed construction defect claims against the developers and builders of 255 Berry Street, Park Terrace (325 Berry), 888 7th Street, 88 Townsend, and Cubix (766 Harrison) as well.

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (29) | (email story)

SFMOMA’s Snøhetta-Designed Expansion Has Broken Ground

SFMOMA Expansion Detailed Rendering

SFMOMA’s Snøhetta-designed 225,000-square-foot expansion officially broke ground this morning. Tomorrow, a free four-day public countdown celebration begins. And starting June 3, the museum will be under construction and closed for two and a half years.

SFMOMA Expansion Rendering: Night

When SFMOMA reopens in early 2016, the museum’s gallery space will have more than doubled, including a new glass enclosed gallery facing Howard Street to showcase Richard Serra's monumental sculpture "Sequence" which has been on display at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center since 2011, on loan from the Fisher Collection:

SFMOMA%20Expansion%20Serra.jpg

SFMOMA Expansion Design: New Details, Renderings And Video [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (30) | (email story)

May 28, 2013

Apple's Union Square Store Design: Simply Incredible, Indeed

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As a number of readers quickly noted a couple of weeks ago, the preliminary designs for Apple's proposed store on Union Square would kill the Grand Hyatt Plaza behind the existing Levi's store and build an 80-foot long wall along Stockton Street. Ruth Asawa’s "San Francisco Fountain," a fixture of the plaza, would appear to get the axe as well.

Grand%20Hyatt%20Plaza.jpg

In the words of John King today, while there’s plenty of time to take the strong points of the design and "make it into something that feels like it belongs," that could be tough:

Apple's desire to move to Union Square from its current shop at 1 Stockton St. was announced by Mayor Ed Lee, who didn't stop there.
"Apple's new store is quite simply incredible," Lee gushed. "I can think of no better location for the world's most stunning Apple store. ... I want to thank Apple for their investment in this city and continued commitment to growing jobs in San Francisco."
With that kickoff, the City Planning Department can't send Apple and [Foster + Partners] back to the drawing board. It's another example of a task-oriented mayor's office putting an emphasis on upbeat press releases over a long-term commitment to the city's physical environment.

At the very least, both proponents and opponents of the proposed design are likely to agree, the proposal is simply incredible, indeed.

Apple's Plan For A Flagship Store On Union Square [SocketSite]
Boxy Apple store could shrink popular plaza [Chronicle]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (51) | (email story)

Full-Court Press Postpones Bay Commission's Opposition To Arena Bill

As proposed, Phil Ting’s Assembly Bill 1273 would revise the existing authorization to develop Pier 30-32 for use as a cruise ship terminal and authorize the Port to approve its development as a multipurpose venue (i.e., the proposed Warriors Arena) instead.

The bill which has already been passed by the Assembly’s Natural Resources, Local Government, and Appropriations committees would effectively bypass the Bay Conservation and Development Commission with respect to oversight of the development of the pier for an arena. As such, the commission's staff is opposed to the bill’s passage.

While the commission was slated to vote on its staff's recommendation to formally oppose Ting's bill, and the commission's meeting wasn't going too well for the Warriors, following a full-court press from the Mayor and local labor leaders, "the commission agreed to simply send a letter to legislators expressing their concerns about the attempted end run - and give the Warriors another month to try to work out their differences over the arena project with the commission's staff."

Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act Aims To Clear The Way For The Warriors [SocketSite]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

May 21, 2013

Rebroadcasting As "The Lofts At Seven" In The Tenderloin

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The redevelopment of Channel 7’s old West Coast broadcasting building site at 277 Golden Gate Avenue is nearly complete with the Tenderloin development between Hyde and Leavenworth slated to hit the market as "The Lofts at Seven" this July.

Lofts%20at%20Seven%20Rendering%20Exterior.jpg

With 88 rental units, The Lofts at Seven's offering will inlcude 31 studios, 12 junior one-bedrooms, and 45 split-level one-bedroom lofts with 18-foot ceilings:

Lofts%20at%20Seven%20Rendering.jpg

Studios range from 275 square feet to 450 square feet, junior one bedrooms from 400 to 525 square feet, and one bedroom lofts from 400 square feet to 850 square feet. A 6,500-square-foot roof deck will be outfitted with an outdoor cinema, barbeques, and fire pit.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

May 20, 2013

The Designs And Dollars For San Francisco's Mexican Museum

If Millennium Partner's proposed 550-foot tower at 706 Mission Street is approved for development, the "core-and-shell" for San Francisco’s Mexican Museum will be built at the tower's base (click images to enlarge) with entrances to the museum from Jessie Square:

The 52,000 square foot museum space, stretching from Jessie Square across two floors of the adjacent Aronson Building and worth $18 to $22 million, would effectively be gifted to the City along with a $5 million operating endowment to The Mexican Museum.

As Jessie Square which fronts the Contemporary Jewish Museum appears today:

Jessie%20Square.jpg

A Big Week And New Renderings For A Big SoMa Tower To Rise [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

A Big Week And New Renderings For A Big SoMa Tower To Rise

706%20mission%202013%20Rendering%202.jpg

With the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for Millennium’s proposed 550-foot tower to rise at 706 Mission Street certified two months ago, this week San Francisco’s Planning Commission will hold a special session in which the 47-story tower with up to 215 condos over a four floor Mexican Museum is expected to be approved to be built upon the site:

Amongst the items on the Commission’s agenda, reclassifying the project site (click image above to enlarge) from a 400-foot to a 520-foot Height and Bulk District and agreeing that the building’s shadows would not be adverse to the neighborhood or Union Square.

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The adjacent Aronson Building would be rehabilitated and attached to the tower. Parking for the development would be below-grade within the existing Jessie Square Garage with a total of 470 parking spaces, of which 210 would be public and 260 private.

550-Foot Museum And Condo Tower Prepares For A Critical Vote [SocketSite]
The 706 Mission Scoop: Design, Details And Timing For Museum Tower [SocketSite]
The Case For A Shorter (Or Perhaps Taller) Tower At 706 Mission? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

May 15, 2013

Revised Designs For CPMC's Cathedral Hill And St. Luke's Hosptials

CPMC Cathedral Hill Rendering

As we first reported in March, the revised Development Agreement for CPMC's proposed Cathedral Hill Campus reduced the height of the Cathedral Hill hospital by two stories within the tower and one story within the podium, decreasing the total proposed building height from 15 floors and 265 feet (above) to 12 floors and 226 feet (below):

CPMC%20Cathedral%20Hill%20Campus%20Rendered%202013.jpg

At the same time, the height of the proposed St. Luke’s hospital with an adjacent Medical Office Building has been increased to seven stories, an increase from 99 to 142 feet:

CPMC%20St%20Lukes%20Rendered%202013.jpg

CPMC%20St%20Lukes%20MOB%20Rendered%202013.jpg

Rebuild CPMC Renderings: 2013 [rebuildcpmc.org]
Compromise Reached For CPMC's Cathedral Hill Campus To Rise [SocketSite]
The Revised Designs And Heights For CPMC's New Hospitals To Rise [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

May 14, 2013

Victorian Era Disco Steps: Can You Feel The Fever?

1303%20Waller.jpg

The five thousand square foot Victorian at the corner of Waller and Masonic was built in 1908 with an alabaster staircase leading up to an ornate front porch. And while likely not designed to be lit up at the time, lights now shine through the translucent stairs at night.

1303%20Waller%20Night.jpg

Call it San Francisco's original Saturday Night Fever staircase:

1303%20Waller%20Steps.jpg

And if you'd like to dance up the steps every night, 1303 Waller, the two-bedroom with original details and a renovated kitchen on the third floor is on the market for $878,000.

1303%20Waller%20Kitchen.jpg

∙ Listing: 1303 Waller (2/1) 1,334 sqft - $878,000 [1303waller.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

Endorsing The Giants $1.5 Billion Mission Rock Development Deal

Mission%20Rock%20Massing.gif

On the agenda for San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors this afternoon, the endorsement of the financial terms and fiscal feasibility for the Giants proposed development of San Francisco’s Seawall 337, also known as the Giants Parking Lot A, or "Mission Rock."

Once the Term Sheet is endorsed, the Giants can commence the formal Planning process (entitlements, environmental impacts, design approval) for the four phase development, with the team now slated to commence construction in 2016, finishing the final phase of development by 2022 assuming the market doesn't dip.

As proposed, the $1.5 billion project will be financed by $200 million in Port funds (bonds, taxes and development rights) and $1.3 billion in private investment. And in terms of the return, the proposed development is expected to yield annual tax and fee revenues to the City of $21,496,000 in addition to a one-time collection of $60,170,000.

While the Port currently receives just under $5 million in rental revenue for the Giants Parking Lot A and Pier 48 parcels, the Port would receive between $1.4 and $1.7 billion in revenue from the Mission Rock development over the 75-year term of the lease.

Mission Rock Term Sheet And Fiscal Feasibility Report [sfbos.org]
Giants Moving Forward With Massive "Mission Rock" Development [SocketSite]
Mission Rock: The Four Phases, Timing, And Sea Rise Clause [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

May 9, 2013

Fancy The Warriors' Plans And Penthouse Views?

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If the Warriors’ plans for Pier 30-32 and penthouses aren’t your cup of tea, you might want to look elsewhere. But if they are, you might take a peek at 219 Brannan #17D.

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The 2,005 square foot three-bedroom unit features big Bay, Bridge, and downtown views from windows that reach from the eleven foot ceilings down to the blonde wood floors:

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Purchased as new for $2,307,500 in 2001 and barely lived in since, 219 Brannan #17D is about to hit the market for $3,500,000 with parking for two and dues of $1,047 per month.

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As plugged-in people know, the penthouse unit with the exact same floor plan one floor above (219 Brannan #18D) sold for $2,942,500 this past September having been purchased for $2,810,000 in August of 2005.

Full Disclosure: The listing agent for 219 Brannan #17D advertises on SocketSite but provided no compensation for this post.

∙ Listing: 219 Brannan #17D (3/3) 2,005 sqft - $3,500,000 [brannanpenthouse.com]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]
A Million Dollars Under Dotcom Days For The Brannan's Penthouse [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

May 8, 2013

Red’s Would Survive The Warriors Move, But Their Patio Would Not

As we reported earlier this week, the revised plans for the Warriors Arena upon Pier 30-32 calls for moving Red’s Java House from its existing location to the south side of the Pier.

And while the building and business would survive, as the renderings and a reader report, Red's private patio and beer garden would not, replaced by public seating as proposed.

Warriors%20Stadium%20Rendering%202013%20Red%27s%20Rear.jpg

Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]
Have No Fear, Red’s To Remain In Place For The America’s Cup [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (20) | (email story)

May 7, 2013

The Towers To Rise Across From The Warriors Arena

With all eyes on the new designs for the proposed arena to be built upon San Francisco's Pier 30-32, we turn our attention to the proposed towers and mid-rise to be built across the street on Seawall Lot (SWL) 330 as part of the Warriors overall development plan.

While the Warriors' preliminary designs for the development of SWL 330 called for two towers rising up to 150 feet from a solid base of retail, their new design calls for two 100-foot hotel buildings on the northern part of the lot and a 175-foot residential tower to the south with a low-rise commercial building, garage and pedestrian walkway between:

The Conceptual Details And Design Discussion For Seawall 330 [SocketSite]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

Warriors Fever At The Watermark?

501 Beale (www.SocketSite.com)

As we first wrote this past November:

While a number of penthouses atop the Watermark at 501 Beale Street have gone back to the bank and sold for substantial discounts over the past couple of years, the 2,055 square foot Penthouse #1C on the 22nd floor at 501 Beale has just hit the market listed for $3,200,000 having been purchased as new for $2,300,000 in January of 2007.
The northeast corner three-bedroom currently features "dramatic Bay, City, and Bay Bridge views," and would directly overlook the new Warriors arena and Seawall 330 developments.

On the day the Warriors advanced to the second round last week, the sale of 501 Beale Street's Penthouse #1C closed escrow with a reported contract price of $2,850,000, up 24 percent versus 2007 and roughly $1,387 per square foot.

Calling All Warriors Willing To Bet On The Watermark And An Arena [SocketSite] 
Another Watermark Penthouse Returns To The Market Bank-Owned [SocketSite]
Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0) | (email story)

May 6, 2013

Redesigned Warriors Arena Unveiled: A Peek Inside And Out

The Warriors have unveiled their revised designs for the proposed San Francisco arena at Pier 30-32, pushed back from the water to accommodate a deep-water berth to the east.

Transparent glass panels and a public walkway around the building would not only provide a peek into the arena but frame the Bay Bridge from inside (click images to enlarge):

The retail component along the Embarcadero has been reduced in size and the public plaza enlarged. And yes, Red’s Java House has been moved to the south side of the Pier.

The Warriors previous design and site plan for the pier: Piers 30-32 Arena Design 1.0.

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (85) | (email story)

May 2, 2013

While The Rumor Mill Was Grinding Away, No Strip Club On Castro

400 Castro Street

While the rumor mill had been grinding away, so to speak, as we first reported last week, the group doing business as RR-SF, Inc. (a.k.a. Randy Rooster) would be presenting their plans for the old Bank of America building at 400 Castro Street (a.k.a. the former Diesel store) to the Merchants of Upper Market & Castro this week.

While we took some heat for lagging behind other reports that a strip club was in the works for the space, in the words of one of the proposed Randy Rooster club's co-owners: "The rumor mill has already started, so we are here to clear up the air."

And in the words of the Bay Area Reporter with respect to RR-SF's plans for 400 Castro:

"It will be an upscale restaurant and nightclub," said co-owner Stephen Jones. "We want to bring a gay gentlemen’s club to the Castro."
Jones later added that the entertainment would be in an "upscale burlesque style" that caters to the tastes of gay men. He likened it to the Crazy Horse in Paris, which opened in 1951 and bills itself as an "avant-garde cabaret," and the gay nightclub The Abbey in West Hollywood.
While the famous Parisian nightspot features half-naked female performers, the San Francisco venue will not involve nudity, said Jones, adding that the business will be run with "dignity, honor and respect."

RR-SF is reportedly in contract to buy the 400 Castro Street building for $7.7 million with another $6 million budgeted for the build-out of the Randy Rooster with hopes that it will become the flagship location for a chain of clubs.

Presenting The Real Plan For Raging On Castro Street [SocketSite]
Gay burlesque venue proposed for the Castro [ebar.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (43) | (email story)

May 1, 2013

Happy Hallidie Day!

Hallidie Building Restored (www.SocketSite.com)

Mayor Ed Lee has declared today "Hallidie Building Day," celebrating a successful two-year restoration of the formerly deteriorating Hallidie Building at 130 Sutter Street.

Designed by Willis Polk and built in 1918 as an investment property for the University of California, the building is named for Andrew Hallidie, a University of California regent and inventor of the cable car.

The Hallidie Building’s steel and glass facade is one of the first examples of modern curtain wall design, the structural and decorative elements for which have been re-painted with the blue and gold Cal colors as originally specified by Polk.

Hallidie%20Building%202013%20Detail.jpg

Heads-Up Near The Hallidie Building (130 Sutter) [SocketSite]
Sorry Cardinal, But Let’s Hear It For The Blue And Gold... [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

Lucas Cultural Arts Museum And Two Others Make The Presidio's Cut

Presidio Commissary Site

From the 16 proposals for reusing the former Commissary and current Sports Basement building at Crissy Field as a cultural facility, three finalists have been selected.

In addition to George Lucas' proposed Cultural Arts Museum, the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy's proposal for The Presidio Exchange and the Chora Group/WRNS proposal for the Bridge/Sustainability Institute made the Presidio Trust's cut.

The finalists will present to the public on June 17 with the winning concept expected to be announced later this year or early in 2014.

Sixteen Proposals For Presidio Site Including A Lucas Arts Museum [SocketSite]
George Lucas' Cultural Arts Museum Proposal And Personal Thoughts [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

April 29, 2013

Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act Aims To Clear The Way For The Warriors

501 Beale (www.SocketSite.com)

Pier 30-32 was granted to the City and County of San Francisco by the state in trust "for purposes of commerce, navigation, and fisheries, and subject to specified terms and conditions relating to the operation of the Port of San Francisco."

While the use of Pier 30-32 for a cruise ship terminal was authorized and written into law, the terminal was built upon Pier 27 instead. And as it stands, an arena upon Pier 30-32 is not a legally authorized use.

Introduced by Assembly Member Phil Ting, Assembly Bill 1273 (a.k.a. the Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act) will be considered by the Assembly Local Government Committee in Sacramento on Wednesday.

As proposed, AB 1273 would revise the existing authorization to develop Pier 30-32 for use as a cruise ship terminal and authorize the Port Commission to approve the development of Pier 30-32 as a multipurpose venue (i.e., the proposed Warriors Arena) instead.

From the Assembly's early analysis of the bill:

The bill asserts that the [proposed Warriors Arena] is consistent with the common law public trust. The challenge with this assertion is that the common law Public Trust Doctrine, as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court, places limitations on the Legislature’s authority to use trust lands for non-trust purposes.
A basketball arena, which is a major feature of the project, is not a traditional public trust use—it does not involve water related commerce, navigation, or fishing. However, there are examples of non-trust uses on public trust lands that have been deemed legitimate by the courts because they are incidental to and accommodate other trust uses.
Additionally, the courts have recognized that the public trust doctrine is flexible to address changing public needs related to public trust lands.

Opponents fear the bill is simply a means by which to bypass the Bay Conservation and Development Commission. As always, we'll keep you posted (up) and plugged-in.

The Pier 30-32 Revitalization Act: AB-1273 [ca.gov]
The Design For The Warriors San Francisco Arena On Piers 30-32 [SocketSite]
Pier 27 Terminal Rendered And Ready For Fiscal Feasibility Vote [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (50) | (email story)

Closing In On Circa 2006 Prices At The Beacon

250 King Street #730

Having been purchased for $650,000 four years ago, the resale of 250 King Street #730 closed escrow on Friday with a reported contract price of $950,000 ($710 per square foot).

Call it 46 percent over the purchase price for the penthouse unit with two parking spaces at the Beacon back in 2009, but still a few percentage points under the unit’s sale for $979,200 in 2006. The two-bedroom condo first sold for $935,000 in 2005.

Will The Rising Tide Lift The Beacon Back Above 2006 Prices? [SocketSite]
Unable To Fund Loan(s) At The Beacon? Hmm... [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

From A Bag Of Gold In 1906 To 2,034 Troy Ounces Today

294%20Page.jpg

Built by Henry Geilfuss for Charles Dietle in 1885 and sold for a bag of gold salvaged from the buyer's destroyed business following the great quake in 1906, the Charles Dietle House at 294 Page Street was designated as San Francisco Landmark #48 in 1972.

294%20Page%20Living.jpg

Purchased for $2,362,500 in October 2006 having been listed for $2,995,000 that May and housing a law office at the time, the five-bedroom Victorian with a variance for commercial activity is back on the market with an interior that's since been restored.

294%20Page%20Dining.jpg

Listed for $2,995,000 once again, as of this morning, that's roughly 2,034 ounces of gold versus the roughly 4,000 ounces paid in 2006. Is it time to salvage that bag of your own?

∙ Listing: 294 Page Street (5/3) - $2,995,000 [294page.com]
San Francisco Landmark #48: Charles Dietle House (294 Page) [noehill.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

April 26, 2013

Alexandria Theater Redevelopment Approved As Proposed

The plans for the redevelopment of the Alexandria Theatre at 5400 Geary Boulevard and construction of a "Spanish/Mediterranean" styled mixed-use building with 37 condos upon the theater's adjacent parking on 18th Avenue have been approved as proposed.

Dilapidated Alexandria Theater Redevelopment Take Two [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | (email story)

April 25, 2013

Presenting The Real Plan For Raging On Castro Street

400 Castro Street

While the Apple rumor was debunked, a plugged-in tipster passes along confirmation that the group doing business as RR-SF, Inc. (a.k.a. "Raging Rooster") will be presenting their plan for the old Bank of America building at 400 Castro Street (a.k.a. the former Diesel store) to the Merchants of Upper Market & Castro next week.

With the rumor mill grinding away, so to speak, it ought to be an interesting presentation.

Apple Has Reportedly Set Their Sights On This Castro Street Site [SocketSite]
Apple Rumor Busted But In Part Confirmed As Well [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (32) | (email story)

April 23, 2013

Mission Rock: The Four Phases, Timing, And Sea Rise Clause

Mission%20Rock%20Phases%202013.gif

With a total projected construction budget of $1.5 billion, the Giants' massive Mission Rock development is proposed to be built in four phases. Construction on the first phase with buildings up to 320 feet in height is currently slated to commence in 2016:

Phase 1 of the Mission Rock development includes parcels A, B, and C along Third Street and a 2,297 space parking garage at the corner of Third and Mission Rock Streets (parcel D). Assuming a 2016 start, Phase 1 would be ready for occupancy in 2018.

Construction of Phase 2 which includes parcels G and K and the five-acre China Basin Park is currently slated to commence in 2017 and would be completed in 2019. Construction of Phase 3 which includes parcels E and F and Mission Rock Square would commence in 2018 and be completed in 2020.

The final phase of the Giants' Mission Rock development includes parcels H, I and J is slated to commence construction in 2019 with delivery by 2022. The redevelopment of Pier 48 upon which Anchor Brewing is planning to build another brewery is also currently scheduled for the final phase of the Mission Rock project but could be accelerated. Anchor has already announced their intentions to begin construction by the end of 2014.

Speaking of Pier 48, according to the term sheet for development: "In light of the current projections of sea level rise, the maximum initial term [for Pier 48's lease] would be 30 years." An option to extend to 66 years will be included but will only be able to be exercised after the City and the Port have established policies and procedures to address the sea level rise.

Giants Moving Forward With Massive "Mission Rock" Development [SocketSite]
The Proposed Park, Plaza, And Mission Rock Square [SocketSite]
The Two Towers And Building Heights For Mission Rock As Proposed [SocketSite]
San Francisco Giants Sign Anchor Brewing To Mission Rock Team [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

April 22, 2013

Dilapidated Alexandria Theater Redevelopment Take Two

Alexandria Theater at 5400 Geary (Image Source: MapJack.com)

The proposed renovation of the Alexandria Theatre and construction of a mixed-use building on the theater’s adjacent parking lot is up for approval this week with a design that has been changed from "modern/contemporary" to "Spanish/Mediterranean."

Renovations to the Alexandria Theatre include its conversion from a three-screen theatre to a 221-seat single-screen theatre, the creation of new retail spaces on the ground floor, and a 7,000 square foot restaurant space on the second floor (click renderings to enlarge).

Upon the adjacent parking lot, a four-story building with retail on the ground floor, 37 condos on the upper three floors and underground parking for 122 cars will rise:

The new building's unit mix includes 13 one-bedrooms, 18 two-bedrooms, and 6 three-bedrooms, with four of the 37 condos to be sold below market rate (BMR).

Shuttered in 2004, by 2010 the theater at 5400 Geary Boulevard had become "a haven for homeless" with a crumbling façade, a boarded-up box office and a once-vibrant entrance riddled with flies and the stench of urine.

As part of the project, the theater’s marquee, blade, and art deco bode sign will be restored along with the terrazzo flooring at the entry and marble clad ticket booth.

The Planning Department recommends the Planning Commission approve the project.

Now Showing At The Shuttered Alexandria Theater: Blight [SocketSite]
Alexandria Theater Plans A Few Weeks From First Public Screening [SocketSite]
A Marque Makeover To Mitigate Alexandria Theater Adverse Effects [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (59) | (email story)

April 19, 2013

Banking On Renewed Appreciation For The Hamilton

The Hamilton Historic Flyer

Purchased for $221,000 in January of 2001, the 480 square foot condo #311 at The Hamilton (631 O'Farrell) was refinanced in 2006 with a new loan for $280,000.

With a notice of default filed in February 2012, at which point the owner was $17,500 past due, this past November the condo hit the courthouse steps. With an opening price of $235,000 and no bidders, the condo was taken back by the bank.

Today, 631 O'Farrell #311 was listed for sale with an asking price of $349,650.

As plugged-in people know, The Hamilton was built as a hotel in 1929 and converted to condos in 1962. The 3,879 square foot penthouse #2101 was created by combining four proposed units on the top floor into one large full-floor unit with private elevator access:

631 O'Farrell #2101 Floor Plan

And yes, the penthouse which was purchased for $2,500,000 in 2000 and on the market for $4,500,000 in 2009 has been remodeled and listed anew for $5,250,000.

631%20O%27Farrell%20%232101%20Living.jpg

∙ Listing: 631 O’Farrell #2101(3/3.5) 3,879 sqft - $5,250,000 [hamiltonpenthouse.com]
Life At The Hamilton (631 O'Farrell): A Plugged-In Reader's Report [SocketSite]
High Atop The Hamilton (631 O’Farrell): Penthouse Listing And History [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

April 17, 2013

The Need And Numbers For San Francisco's Ferry Terminal Expansion

San Francisco Ferry Terminal

While enhancing the economic viability and use of San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal and its surroundings is a key objective of the proposed Ferry Terminal Expansion, the driving force behind the project is the Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA).

By expanding the number of ferry gates and improving pedestrian circulation and boarding, the Ferry Terminal expansion project will enhance WETA’s emergency response capabilities to evacuate people from San Francisco in the event of a major catastrophic event, such as the Loma Prieta earthquake which disabled the Bay Bridge in 1989.

With seven new routes and ferry service from downtown San Francisco to Berkeley, Richmond, Treasure Island, Hercules, Martinez, Antioch and Redwood City planed to be introduced between 2014 and 2030, the ferry terminal will serve a projected 32,000 riders per weekday by 2035, up from around 10,000 passengers across six ferry routes today.

The current estimated cost for the expansion plan as proposed is roughly $93 million with the full build-out of the proposed improvements "contingent on potential ridership demand at full build-out of the proposed Treasure Island redevelopment."

With no plans to incorporate a landing for water taxis at the Terminal as part of the expansion, Pier 1½ in the upper right corner of the photo above would continue to serve as the downtown stop for water taxi and shuttle services on the Bay.

The Plans To Expand San Francisco's Ferry Terminal And Service [SocketSite]
Downtown Ferry Terminal Expansion [sfport.com]
$1.7B Treasure Island/Hunters Point Development Deal Falls Apart [SocketSite]
San Francisco Water Taxi/Shuttle Services Set For October Launch [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

April 16, 2013

The Plans To Expand San Francisco's Ferry Terminal And Service

Ferry%20Terminal%20Aerial.jpg

Conceptual plans to expand San Francisco’s Ferry Terminal have been drawn, the project’s potential environmental impacts are being reviewed, and Sinbad's days are numbered.

Ferry%20Terminal%20Planning%20Area.jpg

As proposed and rendered below, the expansion includes three new berthing facilities, new covered passenger queuing areas, and a new public Embarcadero Plaza located between the Ferry Building and Agriculture Building, infilling the existing lagoon.

Ferry%20Terminal%20Embarcadero%20Plaza.jpg

The detailed Ferry Terminal Expansion plan, timing and new ferry services (think Berkeley, Richmond and Treasure Island) are as follows, click the plan to enlarge:

The San Francisco Ferry Terminal Expansion plan includes:

1. The construction of three new ferry terminal berthing facilities (Gate A in the North Basin, and Gate F and Gate G in the South Basin);

2. The removal of Pier ½ and Pier 2 to accommodate the construction of the new ferry terminal berthing facilities;

3. The construction of three, new, photovoltaic canopies (located in front of Gate A, Gate B, and perpendicular to Gates E, F, and G); and

4. The construction of the new Embarcadero Plaza, which would infill an existing lagoon with a new deck and piles and create a new open space between the Ferry Building and Agriculture Building.

In terms of timing and new ferry services, the project will likely be constructed in two phases with the North Basin improvements slated to start in 2014 to support new Berkeley and Richmond ferry services scheduled for 2015/2016.

The South Basin improvements would be phase two, timed to coincide with the start of the Treasure Island ferry service which is scheduled to commence in 2016/2017.

And yes, in additon to the parkling pad upon pier ½ and the lagoon to the south of the Ferry Building, Sinbad's which sits upon San Francisco's Pier 2 would be history.

Ferry%20Terminal%20Demolition.jpg

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

April 15, 2013

A Record Setting Sale On Billionaires Row

2950 Broadway (Image Source: 2950broadway.com)

Hidden behind non-disclosure agreements and tax records stamped "DO NOT FILM," you’re not supposed to know about the sale of 2950 Broadway which was purchased for $29,500,000 in 2011, remodeled a bit last year, and very quietly traded hands last month.

And you're definitely not supposed to know the confidential sale price which has set a new record for homes in San Francisco.

With $875,000 in transfer tax paid to the city, the sale price for 2950 Broadway was $35,000,000 or roughly $3,182 per square foot, displacing 2840 Broadway to become the most expensive single-family home ever sold in San Francisco.

As we first wrote about 2950 Broadway back in 2009, "it’s the outer Broadway mansion from which Melvin Belli ran naked firing a pistol at his wife who hosted a real estate show for the highest priced properties on television," the only one with a heated outdoor pool.

2950 Broadway Pool Aerial

The seller of 2950 Broadway was musician (think Tangerine Dream) turned real estate and natural resource investor Peter Baumann. The buyer was hidden behind an LLC.

Stay tuned for the hidden identity of the buyer who wasn't a Facebook, Apple or Twitter founder. Nor was the buyer from overseas.

UPDATE: The Trainas Are Trading Up On Billionaires Row.

2950 Broadway Sells For $29,500,000 (And No, That's Not A Typo) [SocketSite]
The Confidential Sale Price For 2840 Broadway On Billionaire’s Row [SocketSite]
When Friia Ruled San Francisco Real Estate (A Reader’s Recollection) [SocketSite]
From Tangerine To A Gold Coast Dream [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

April 11, 2013

Contemplating Condos, 340 Bryant Goes The Creative Office Route

340%20Bryant.jpg

Built in 1952, the former Machine Works building at 340 Bryant Street offers "unparalleled Bay Bridge access" in broker speak and marketing materials.

Having contemplated and analyzed the potential for demolishing the four-story industrial building to build a 150 unit condo project, the owners of 340 Bryant appear to have settled on an alternate plan to renovate the existing building and rebrand as "a creative office structure" with a bit of non-structural interior demolition and remodeling underway.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

Defining And Redefining The Classic Hartford Building At 650 California

650 California (www.SocketSite.com)

When the construction of 650 California Street was completed in 1964, the 34 story tower was the tallest building in California, a title long since passed.

Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill for Hartford Insurance with an exoskeleton of precast white concrete into which the floor-to-ceiling windows of the 466-foot tower are recessed, the Hartford Building was bought by Tishman Speyer for $230 million last year.

While Tishman is now "redefining" the building's lobby and converting a bit of office space into a fitness center, locker rooms, and a conference room, the classic building isn't about to be reskinned or repurposed a la the renovation of 100 Van Ness that's now underway.

The Renovation Of 100 Van Ness And 400 New Rentals Are Underway [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (26) | (email story)

April 10, 2013

Remodeled With Two Tons Of Rock And $400K Worth Of Steel Work

461%202nd%20%23557%20Living.jpg

With two tons of river rock and $400,000 worth of fabricated steel and glass inside, the Olle Lundberg designed loft #T557 at the ClockTower (461 2nd Street) sold for $1,160,000 in early 2007 having been on the market for $1,195,000 at the time.

461%202nd%20%23557%20Dining.jpg

Listed for $1,399,000 two months ago and briefly in contract, the asking price for the 1,812 square foot loft with a Hobart in the kitchen has just been reduced to $1,349,000.

461%202nd%20%23557%20Kitchen.jpg

Purchased for $375,000 in 1995 prior to the Lundberg makeover, the redesigned loft first resold for $1,050,000 in September 2000 and then for $785,000 in August of 2002.

And yes, that's a custom fabricated pull-down bed behind the breakfast table above.

∙ Listing: 461 2nd Street #T557 (1/2) 1,812 sqft - $1,349,000 [clocktower557t.com]
The ClockTower Lofts (461 2nd Street) [SocketSite]
Lundberg, ClockTower, And Cocktails…Oh My! [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

April 4, 2013

Lighthouse Lofts Before And After

1097%20Howard%202013.jpg

Speaking of long vacant buildings in the neighborhood, just down the street from the Hugo Hotel, the Lighthouse Building at the corner of Howard and Seventh was empty from 1982 to 1996 at which point it was rehabilitated and redeveloped as 22 loft condominiums.

1097%20Howard%20%23201%20Living.jpg

Two of those original twenty-two units have since been combined to become the 2,400 square foot Lighthouse Lofts unit #201 with two bedrooms, two bathrooms, two parking spaces, and one new kitchen with an induction range and a new hood:

1097%20Howard%20%23201%20Kitchen%20After.jpg

As the kitchen looked when the unit was purchased for $1,295,000 in March of 2007:

1097%20Howard%20%23201%20Kitchen%20Before.jpg

Having been remodeled, repainted and redecorated, 1097 Howard #201 has just returned to the market listed for $1,395,000.

∙ Listing: 1097 Howard #201 (2/2) 2,400 sqft - $1,395,000 [pacunion.com]
The Lighthouse Lofts In General (1097 Howard), And #308 In Specific [SocketSite]
Defenestration's Days Are Numbered [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

Defenestration's Days Are Numbered

200%206th%20Street%202013.jpg

With a plan in place to mitigate the loss of the Hugo Hotel at 200 6th Street, deemed to be a contributing resource for the newly defined "6th Street Lodginghouse Historic District" and canvas from which Defenestration’s flying furniture has hung for years, this afternoon San Francisco’s Planning Commission is slated to clear the way for the hotel to be razed and for Mercy Housing to move forward with their plans to build a nine-story residential building with 67 affordable housing units on the corner of 6th and Howard Streets.

200 6th Street Rendering (www.SocketSite.com)

The burned-out Hugo Hotel was acquired by San Francisco's Redevelopment Agency by way of eminent domain for $4.6 million back in 2009. The owners of the building, which has been sitting vacant for nearly two decades, had been holding out for $7,000,000.

Defenestration

Mercy Me: Hugo Hotel Is Historically Significant, The Plan To Mitigate [SocketSite]
South of Market Resource Survey Says…Five New Historic Districts [SocketSite]
Hugo Hotel's Flying Furniture Update, No Word On The Graffiti [SocketSite]
Redeveloping Sixth Street: Corner Of Sixth And Howard As Envisioned [SocketSite]
The Hugo Hotel Has A Date With A Different Kind Of Bench [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

A Rather Unbelievable New NIMBY And Anti-Green Roof Argument

535%20El%20Camino%20Del%20Mar.jpg

Constructed in 1951, the owners of the one-story ranch house at 535 El Camino Del Mar with a small second story over its garage would like to expand the space over the garage by 516 square feet, maintaining an 18 foot setback and adding a green roof.

535%20El%20Camino%20Del%20Mar%20Rendering.gif

Raising concerns which include the project’s adverse effect on a historic structure, an incompatibility with the neighborhood character and prevailing heights, and "the invasion of nonnative species caused by the green roof," five neighbors in surrounding three story homes have asked the Planning Commission to block the addition to 535 El Camino Del Mar by way of a Discretionary Review (DR).

535%20El%20Camino%20Del%20Mar%20DR%20Requestors.jpg

From the Planning Department with respect to the project and DR requestors' concerns:

The addition of a small second-story addition set back approximately 18 feet from the closest front building wall (approximately 35 feet from the front property line) is a very modest addition that remains consistent with the varied heights and architectural styles of adjacent structures, in addition to the character of buildings within the surrounding Sea Cliff neighborhood.
The concerns about the project’s adverse effect on neighboring properties light, air, privacy, and midblock open space are unfounded, since the project is located a significant distance from most of the DR Requestors’ properties (ranging from between approximately 40 feet and 135 feet). The addition is separated by a private easement (at the rear) from four of the DR Requestors’ properties. There is also no expansion to the existing building footprint; therefore, the project will not adversely affect the existing pattern of open space.
Furthermore, the addition has been sensitively designed to be an appropriate addition to a historic resource, and has been reviewed and approved by the Department’s historic preservation staff. Although the subject building was determined to be a historic resource, an impact analysis was conducted by a preservation planner and the project was determined to be consistent with the Secretary’s Standards and to not have a significant impact.
Lastly, the Department supports living roofs as a positive green building feature and encourages them wherever feasible. The addition of a green roof does not create an “exceptional or extraordinary circumstance” that would warrant changes to the project.

San Francisco’s Planning Commission will hear the arguments and vote this afternoon. As the project does not contain or create any exceptional or extraordinary circumstances, this project would not have made it to the Commission under pending DR Reform Legislation.

Another perspective on the position of the project relative to the DR requestors’ homes and their views to the ocean which might hint at their underlying concerns:

535%20El%20Camino%20Del%20Mar%20DR%20View.gif

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

April 3, 2013

Appreciation For A Luxury Russian Hill Penthouse: 2005 To Today

Purchased for $3,100,000 in early 2005, Penthouse #6 atop the Russian Hill building at 2555 Larkin Street returned to the market last year listed for $3,600,000.

Withdrawn, relisted, and reduced to $3,450,000 in February, the sale of 2555 Larkin Street #6 closed escrow last week with a reported contract price of $3,275,000, a total of six (6) percent over its sale price in 2005 for the "ultimate luxury cooperative penthouse" with Golden Gate Bridge views from the living and dining room(s).

Lurking Behind This Larkin Street Penthouse Wall: The Office [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

April 1, 2013

Is NOPA Ready For The Harding's Re-Development And Density?

HardingTheater

Following years of battling with the Planning Board and preservationists, plans to gut the long shuttered Harding Theater at 616 Divisadero Street and build a mixed-use development with retail behind a restored façade and an eight-unit condo complex behind the theater were abandoned four years ago.

Harding Theater: Developer's Plan

Put on the market for $4,000,000 at the end of 2008, reduced to $3,600,000, and then withdrawn from the market mid-last year, the Harding has been listed anew for $4,200,000 with Bi-Rite and Four Barrel’s The Mill having since opened their doors down the street.

In the words of a local reader, is the neighborhood ready for the Harding's development and density along Divisadero?

Harding Theater Development Positive Review Panned On Appeal [SocketSite]
Harding Theater (616 Divisadero): Developer Throwing In The Towel? [SocketSite]
Bi-Rite Grocery (And Creamery!) In NoPa: Hours, Loading And Vote [SocketSite]
Harding Theater Available For $4.2 Million [haighteration.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

Tippy Top Tier Apples-To-Apples Atop Pacific Heights

2006%20Washington%20%231%20Kitchen.jpg

As we wrote about the five million dollar pied-a-terre at 2006 Washington two months ago:

Designed by Conrad Alfred Meussdorffer, the überexclusive building at 2006 Washington was designed to take advantage of 100 feet of open space to the west, facing the Golden Gate Bridge and overlooking the Spreckels Mansion in which Danielle Steele now resides.
Originally ten units, the 2,200 square foot penthouse atop 2006 Washington was separated from the tenth floor to create an eleventh. And while floors two through ten are 5,500 square foot, full-floor co-op apartments, unit number one on the first floor is "only" a two-bedroom, perhaps that’s why it’s been listed as "an elegant pied-a-terre defined."
Purchased for $4,900,000 in March of 2009...the recently renovated 2006 Washington Street #1 is now back on the market and listed for $5,299,000. And yes, the building's Board must interview and approve the buyer.

Having been approved by the Board but as of yet unidentified, the sale of 2006 Washington Street #1 closed escrow this past Friday with a reported contract price of $5,250,000, up a total of 7 percent (1.7 percent a year) since 2009 on an apples-to-apples basis.

While the marketing site for the property had touted "Offered for the first time in decades," as best we can tell the former President of CBRE Investors had purchased the unit from the Harris estate in 2009. Robert Harris had been the oldest living partner at the storied San Francisco law firm Heller Ehrman prior to its passing in 2008 as well.

A Five Million Dollar Pied–À–Terre In Pacific Heights [SocketSite]
The Full Floor Plan Monty For 2006 Washington Number Four [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

March 27, 2013

Transbay Tower Site Transferred And Ceremonially Breaks Ground

With a past due check for $191,816,196.57 delivered yesterday, the Transbay Joint Powers Authority has officially sold and transferred the 101 First Street site upon which the 1,070-foot Transbay Tower will rise at the corner of First and Mission to the development team.

The competition to develop the site was won back in 2007 with a bid of $350 million, roughly $160 million more than the team ended up paying for the site yesterday.

A ceremonial groundbreaking to celebrate (or mourn) the transfer is taking place today.

Financial Partner Secured To Build San Francisco’s Transbay Tower [SocketSite]
Proposed 1,070-Foot Transbay Tower Approved To Rise [SocketSite]
Transbay Land Cost Cut Another $50 Million For Shrunken Tower [SocketSite]
Rising Construction Costs Getting Under The Transbay Center's Skin [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

March 22, 2013

March Mansion Madness: Minor's Major Price Cut

3800 Washington

Halsey Minor paid $20,000,000 for the 18,000 square foot mansion at 3800 Washington, the adjacent 2,618 square foot guesthouse, and the undeveloped lot behind back in 2007.

Le Petit Trianon (Image Source: lepetittrianon.com)

Having been deemed "abandoned" by the city in 2011 with an order of abatement issued for failing to comply with San Francisco’s Abandoned Building Ordinance, the property was spruced up a bit and returned to the market last May listed for $25,000,000.

This morning, the list price for the trio of Presidio Heights properties was reduced by $4,000,000 (16 percent), now asking $21,000,000. Congratulations if you picked another price cut in your mansion sales pool, or Oregon and California in that other one.

∙ Listing: 3800-3810 Washington / 125 Maple - $21,000,000 [byzantiumbrokerage]
Minor’s "Abandoned" Mansion At 3800 Washington [SocketSite]
Beauty Blight Is In The Eye Of The City (And Perhaps Your Neighbors) [SocketSite]
Halsey Minor's "Abandoned" $20,000,000 Mansion Hits The Market [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

March 18, 2013

Rising Construction Costs Getting Under The Transbay Center's Skin

With construction costs for San Francisco’s Transbay Transit Center climbing, including a near doubling of the estimated $144 million cost for the centers steel superstructure to $259 million alone, the architects are now proposing a perforated aluminum skin for the transit center versus glass as originally designed (click image above to enlarge):

Transbay%20Transit%20Center%20Skin.jpg

Cloaking the Center in aluminum versus glass would trim $17 million from the estimated $1.59 billion budget for the Center's first phase which is scheduled to open in 2017.

In the words of John King, "the unanswered question is what other design changes might lay ahead" as the architects aim to trim costs for the project which was budgeted to cost closer to $1.2 billion back in 2007.

Transbay Center Plans: Revised, Refined, And Unveiled Today [SocketSite]
Transbay center design change proposed [SFGate]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (72) | (email story)

March 14, 2013

Showcase Hellman Mansion Sells For A Few Million Less Than In 2004

2020 Jackson Street

Purchased by the Catherine Schwab Revocable Trust for $15,000,000 in 2004 and priced at $20,000,000 in 2011, the nearly 12,000 square foot Hellman Mansion at 2020 Jackson Street has just sold for $12,750,000 with an official "4 months" on the market.

2020 Jackson Entry

Call it 15 percent below its 2004 price despite a bit of designer updating along the way.

2020 Jackson: Main Kitchen After

Once again, The Julius Kraft designed home was built in 1902 by Wells Fargo Bank President Isaias Hellman as a wedding gift for his daughter and served as the makeshift headquarters of Wells Fargo following San Francisco's great quake and fire in 1906:

2020 Jackson Street circa 1906

The Hellman Mansion Officially Hits The Market Listed For $20 Million [SocketSite]
Schwab's 2020 Jackson Street Returns For A Skosh Less Than In 2004 [SocketSite]
2012 Decorator Showcase Sneak Peek And Kitchen Before And After [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

March 13, 2013

Another Peek Inside (And From) The Penultimate Four Seasons Pad

765 Market #27A Kitchen

Having sold for $7,200,000 two years ago, the purchase of 765 Market Street #27A was the second most expensive in San Francisco’s Four Seasons history, second only to the 4,336 square foot Grand Penthouse #A which sold for $8,975,000 in 2008.

765 Market #27A Living

As plugged-in people know, the 3,318 square foot #27A was redesigned (think moving a bath and the kitchen) and renovated by Orlando Diaz-Azcuy Design (think not cheap):

765%20Market%20%2327A%20Floor%20Plan.gif

While you won’t currently find 765 Market Street #27A on the MLS, the condo is back on the market and asking $8,400,000 which includes the Orlando Diaz-Azcuy custom designed furniture, and a few enhancements, once again.

765%20Market%20%2327A%20Living%202013.jpg

And yes, the buyer should be well aware of the proposed 550-foot 706 Mission tower which will rise to the right of the brick Aronson Building below if approved.

765%20Market%20%2327A%20View.jpg

Full Disclosure: The listing agent for 765 Market Street #27A advertises on SocketSite but provided no compensation for this post.

∙ Listing: 765 Market Street #27A (3/4.5) 3,318 sqft - $8,400,000 [fourseasons27a.com]
Second Most Expensive Sale In San Francisco Four Seasons' History [SocketSite]
San Francisco’s Four Seasons (765 Market) #27A: Winter 2011 [SocketSite]
550-Foot Museum And Condo Tower Prepares For A Critical Vote [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

The Plans For 1950 Page: From Kids Club To Condos In The Haight?

1950 Page

Assuming that the proposed Hayes Valley development at 344 Fulton is approved and the Boys & Girls Club makes the move, a reader wonders what’s to become of the Club’s old clubhouse over at 1950 Page Street in the Haight.

While nothing formal has been pitched nor yet proposed to Planning, the developer of 344 Fulton has been exploring options for "maximizing the property within the context of a [potential] market-rate development" at 1950 Page.

Zoned for residential development and 40 feet in height, exploratory drawings have been drafted for a four-story building with up to 59 units and parking for residents either at grade or underground.

Black And White In Hayes Valley And In The Ayes Of Planning [SocketSite]
A New Hayes Valley Home For The Boys & Girls And Adults [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

March 12, 2013

Will The Rising Tide Lift The Beacon Back Above 2006 Prices?

In October of 2005, the two-bedroom Beacon unit #730 at 250 King Street was purchased for $935,000 ($699 per square foot). Four months later, the top-floor condo was relisted for $1,125,000 and resold for $979,200 ($732 per foot) in early 2006 according to public records, a sale which was reported at $1,080,000 on the MLS, an "$807 per square foot" price which would have been used for industry reports and Realtor comps.

Having fallen into foreclosure by early 2009, 250 King Street #730 resold for $650,000 ($486 per foot) that August. The 1,338 square foot Beacon condo with parking for two cars is now back on the market and listed for $998,000 ($746 per foot).

As plugged-in people know, a year ago the 1,476 square foot Beacon two-bedroom #802 sold for $811,000, up 21 percent versus its 2010 sale price of $527,077 on courthouse steps but 10 percent below its 2006 price of $906,666.

Amongst the 172 preforeclosure properties currently spread across San Francisco, four are units at the Beacon, including the 1,186 square foot unit #720 which was purchased for $863,500 ($728 per square foot) in September of 2005.

∙ Listing: 250 King Street #730 (2/2) 1,338 sqft - $998,000 [via Redfin]
Foreclosure Activity Plummets In San Francisco [SocketSite]
A Beacon Of Hope [SocketSite]
A Beacon Of Distress (250 King #802) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

March 6, 2013

Sixteen Proposals For Presidio Site Including A Lucas Arts Museum

Presidio Commissary Site

The Presidio Trust has received 16 proposals for reusing the former Commissary and current Sports Basement building at Crissy Field as a cultural facility, including one by George Lucas to create the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum on the site.

As many might recall, it was only a few years ago that Donald Fisher and his family abandoned their efforts to build a contemporary art museum at the Main Post of the Presidio having butted heads with NIMBY neighbors and preservationists.

The 15 other concepts for the Commissary site and timing:

Audio/Media tour provider: Tour center for the Presidio (Antenna International)

The Bridge/Sustainability Institute: An education institution integrating the social, economic and natural history of the Presidio. (Chora/WRNS)

Presidio Regional Center: A center for the study of Cities of the Future and a headquarters for ideas to establish a Regional/Metropolitan Form of Governance for the Bay Area’s 9 counties and 101 cities. (Jay Claiborne/Jerry Goldberg)

The Color Lab: A color museum and laboratory "where people can come to explore the great wonder and beauty that is color and what it means to them and how it enhances their everyday lives." (Color Foundation)

Global Observatory: A cultural center that looks forward, showcases outstanding solutions for creating a better world and accelerates people’s creative impulses to help. (The GO Team)

Presidio Exchange: Extending the core themes of the Presidio to regional, national and international audiences (Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy)

PlayLabs: An institution to explore the connections between play and innovation, connecting arts and humanities to sciences and history. (JCC&A)

Green Museum and Environmental Center: Museum chronicling the rise of environmental issues and causes over the last fifty years and a resource and learning center displaying the technology, techniques and trends involved in combating climate change and creating a sustainable society. (Mark Kitchell)

Altered Lands: Design, programming and education strategies to portray how humans have shaped our environment through history, art, science, and cultures as it relates to the Presidio, the San Francisco Peninsula, the GGNRA, the Bay Area, Northern California and the Pacific West. (KV & Associates)

National New Deal Museum: Focusing on the U.S. government's response to the Great Depression, the New Deal Museum would invite visitors to look to the past, reflect on the present, and provoke thinking about how we as a nation can create a more equitable society. (The Living New Deal)

The Innovation Center: A hub for thought and discussion (Mycotoo)

Michael Heyman Journeys Center: A cultural center with interactive galleries to honor former Cal chancellor Michael Heyman (Larry O'Reilly Associates)

Crissy Field Cultural Center: A proposal to reclaim the landscape back to nature and reuse the building as community centered facility with exhibits, classrooms, work space, public space, and a cafe. (Organic Architect)

History Center of the Golden Gate: A history center for visitors to discover how the West helped shape the nation. (Presidio Historical Association)

San Francisco Media Technology Center: A space to support and encourage innovators, artists, inventors and entrepreneurs (Transmedia SF)

Finalists will be announced in April with the winning concept expected to be announced later this year or early in 2014. The Trust continues to work with Sports Basement to find a permanent replacement location within the Presidio.

Presidio Parkway's Final Phase And Commissary’s Sporting Days [SocketSite]
Commissary Proposals [presidio.gov]
The Fishers Break CAMP With Respect To The Presidio's Main Post [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (34) | (email story)

March 5, 2013

Compromise Reached For CPMC's Cathedral Hill Campus To Rise

CPMC Cathedral Hill Rendering

Sometime today, California Pacific Medical Center and City Hall are expected to announce a compromise which will allow the development of a downsized Cathedral Hill campus to move forward and ensure the rebuilding of St. Luke’s over in the Mission.

With the paperwork having been filed to demolish the existing Cathedral Hill Hotel early last year but CPMC's pre-construction teams sent packing last August, the City and Sutter Health have been wrangling over the rewritten terms for CPMC's Cathedral Hill campus which was approved by Planning, but then appealed, ever since.

According to the Business Times, the expected compromise calls for CPMC's Cathedral Hill complex to be downsized from an orignally proposed 555 beds to 274 while CPMC's St. Luke’s hospital would be expanded from an existing 80 beds to 120.

UPDATE: The compromise has been confirmed with 304 beds at CPMC's Cathedral Hill campus versus the originally reported 274. The revised plan will be reviewed by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors on March 12. If approved, the project will likely take until the end of the decade to complete.

A Scaled-Down Cathedral Hill Campus And Expanded St. Luke's [SocketSite]
Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall [SocketSite]
CPMC's Pre-Construction Teams Sent Packing [SocketSite]
Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA [SocketSite]
City Hall, California Pacific to announce Cathedral Hill compromise Tuesday [bizjournals]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

March 1, 2013

A Peek Inside The Aliotos' Towering Home In Pacific Heights

2898%20Vallejo%20Facade.jpg

As we first reported last month:

Frank and Frances Alioto purchased the 9,500 square foot Pacific Heights house at 2898 Vallejo Street in 1973 for $225,000 following its use in the filming of The Towering Inferno, serving as the mansion for Richard Chamberlain’s character Roger Simmons, the cheapskate electrical engineer who cut corners and was to blame for the tower's fire.
Frank passed away in 1994. And with Frances' passing this past November, the estate is now bringing the five-bedroom Beaux-Arts home with five full baths and a five car garage to the market for $16,500,000.
With a tax basis of $439,219, the total property tax bill for 2898 Vallejo was $5,205 in 2011. A sale at asking would likely increase the annual bill to around $193,000.

Last night 2898 Vallejo was officially listed and interior photos just went live:

2898%20Vallejo%20Bedroom.jpg

Feel free to take a peek inside and check out the views.

2898%20Vallejo%20Family%20Room.jpg

Don't forget the floor plans with an estimated 8,945 finished square feet (click to enlarge).

∙ Listing: 2898 Vallejo (6/5.75) 8,945 sqft - $16,500,000 [2898vallejo.com]
The Alioto's Towering Home On Vallejo Hits The Market For $16.5M [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (26) | (email story)

The Rebuilt Façade Of 1436 Sanchez Street Today And Before

1436 Sanchez Facade (www.SocketSite.com)

With 83 photos on the marketing site for the rebuilt Victorian at 1436 Sanchez Street but nary a one of the façade, a plugged-in reader delivers a photo taken today "on a rare foggy morning in this part of Noe Valley." And as the facade looked before:

1436 Sanchez Before

UPDATE: In the words of another reader, "Now 86 images and #43 is the front."

1436 Sanchez Facade

Comments: Noe Valley Victorian Aims To Be SF's Eighth LEED Platinum Home [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | (email story)

February 27, 2013

Fox Plaza And Approved Plans For Expansion Have Changed Hands

Fox%20Plaza%20Rendered.jpg

Last week a plugged-in reader and resident of Fox Plaza at 1390 Market Street received notice that Archstone Fox Plaza had been bought by Essex Residential Property Trust. The complex will now be known as Essex Fox Plaza.

The sale included the 443-residential units on the top 16 floors of the 29-story tower, the 407-car underground garage, the attached two-story retail building, and the approved plans to build an additional 250 residential units on the corner as rendered above.

A Step Forward For The Plans To Expand Fox Plaza (1390 Market) [SocketSite]
Approved Fox Plaza Expansion Seeks Extension To Break Ground [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (22) | (email story)

Masonic Auditorium Plans Back On Track And Nob Hill In Harmony

Masonic Auditorium Rendering

Over the objections of Nob Hill neighbors who feared that the project would lead to an increase in noise, traffic, loitering, and litter, plans to renovate and expand the Masonic Auditorium were approved by San Francisco’s Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors in 2010.

A lawsuit filed by the Nob Hill neighbors challenging the project received a favorable ruling from the court which ordered additional analysis and put the plans on hold.

Following years of discord, the Freemasons of California which own the building, Live Nation which leases the building, and the Nob Hill Coalition and Nob Hill Association have reached an agreement to allow the renovation to go forward. Key tenets of the agreement include:

• Cap on the number of live entertainment events
The number of live entertainment events will be capped at 54 concerts per year with an additional 25 cultural/comedy events per year. In addition, the Masonic will continue to host various ceremonies, corporate meetings and other special events.

• Controls on Alcohol Consumption
Alcohol service is limited to three full-service food and beverage concession stands for public events with 2,000 people or less, with one of the stands located in the VIP-only California room. No more than five full-service stands are allowed for larger public events and there will be no stands inside the auditorium.

• Establishment of the Huntington Park Preservation Fund
Live Nation and the Masons will make ongoing contributions in support of a new Huntington Park Preservation fund which is aimed at upgrading the facilities and making it a preeminent urban park. The initial project will be a major upgrade to the Children’s Playground on the north side of the park which has been in the works for some time and which is also being supported by contributions from neighbors. The capital cost of the Children’s Playground is estimated at $500,000.

• Creation of a School Music Program
Live Nation will sponsor a school music program for schools in District 3. Individual schools will be able to apply for grants for monies to buy musical instruments or fund student music programs, and Live Nation will work to make musical venues available to student performers.

• Reduced rental fees for ethic and cultural live entertainment events
The Masonic has a strong history of use by a diverse selection of ethnic entertainment, and Live Nation will continue to foster this diversity by offering reduced rental rates for ethnic and cultural performers.

• No Opposition to Final Permit
The neighborhood associations agree they will no longer contest the issuance of the Conditional Use Permit, ABC License or Building Permit for the Masonic’s proposed interior renovations.

The renovation is now slated to be completed by mid-2014.

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

Plans For 120 New Condos Where Café Cocomo Stands (Or Shakes)

Cafe%20Cocomo%20-%20650%20Indiana.jpg

As we first reported a few weeks ago, Café Cocomo’s dancing days at 650 Indiana are numbered as a proposal to develop the site on which the club stands has been quietly pitched to San Francisco’s Planning Department. We now have the details for what is being proposed, including 120 residential units, a new public plaza, and the "Cocomo mews":

Zoned for development up to 58 feet in height, the proposed project would raze the existing structures between 630 and 698 Indiana and construct two 5-story buildings with 120 new residential units and 85 parking spaces; 1,417 square feet of retail; and 4,695 square feet of ground floor residential/commercial flex space along Indiana Street.

650 Indiana Site

An 8,900 square foot public plaza would be created at the corner of Indiana and 19th Streets and the two 5-story buildings would share a new mid-block alleyway dubbed the "Cocomo mews" which would provide access to the parking garage.

Café Cocomo's Dancing Days Are Numbered, Condos Coming Soon? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

February 26, 2013

Successfully Upzoned, Plans For The Castro's Fitness SF Take Shape

2301 Market now and as proposed

With the southwestern corner of Market and Noe having been successfully upzoned from 50 to 65 feet (and Café Flore's off-site kitchen protected), plans to add three stories to the building that currently houses Fitness SF at 2301 Market Street are taking shape.

First proposed in 2011, the plans call for another full-floor (9,500 square feet) for the gym, twelve new dwelling units on the top two floors, and a renovated retail space below.

According to the Castro Biscuit, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf has already signed a lease for the renovated retail space but will need the Planning Commission’s approval to occupy as formula retail, the conditional use for which was actually applied for late last year.

Upzoning The Corner Of Market And Noe And Fighting Over Café Flore [SocketSite]
Should The Planning Commission Dictate Which Businesses Survive? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (43) | (email story)

February 25, 2013

No Valentine's Day Love For Orchard Supply Hardware In SF

As we first reported two weeks ago with respect to the proposal to convert the Pacific Sales building at 975 Bryant into a 33,000 square foot Orchard Supply Hardware store:

While it took over a decade to get a new home improvement store out on Bayshore Boulevard, with the backing of the Planning Department, Orchard Supply Hardware is hoping to get a quick approval to convert the Pacific Sales building at 975 Bryant into a 33,000 square foot OSH with a plant nursery on the roof.
Other proposed changes to the building at 975 Bryant include landscaping, a new Bryant Street entrance, and a change of windows along Bryant Street to increase transparency.

Despite's San Francisco's Planning Department noting that the proposed project "is desirable for, and compatible with the surrounding neighborhood," would "[improve] the pedestrian experience along Bryant Street" and "meets all applicable requirements of the Planning Code," following public testimony on February 14, San Francisco’s Planning Commission adopted a motion of Intent to Disapprove the project by a vote of 5 to 2 with Commissioners Fong and Antonini dissenting.

The Planning Commission is scheduled to revisit the proposed project and the NIMBYs' objections, and act on their intent, with a vote this week.

Orchard Supply Hardware Coming To SoMa If Approved [SocketSite]
T-Minus Two Days (And A Decade In The Making) For Lowe’s In SF [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

February 21, 2013

Newly Proposed Height And Horizontality On Federal Street

77-85 Federal Street

A plan to demolish the two existing office buildings at 77-85 Federal Street and construct a five-story commercial building with a gym on the ground floor and an underground garage with 29 parking spaces has been floated with San Francisco’s Planning Department.

While we haven’t seen the proposed design for the building, the Planning Department has and has offered the following architectural suggestions:

To strengthen the project’s compatibility with the surrounding [South End Historic] district, the project should accentuate a tripartite organization, including strengthening the base, and vertically modulating the façades with a rhythm of solid columns, in order to emphasize the solid-to-void ratio. This rhythm should be introduced on all levels. Overall the building façade exhibits a strong horizontality. There appears to be several different approaches to the treatment of the glass. The Planning Department suggests that the glazing system be developed to be more unified and balanced with solid columnar elements.
Additionally, the module of the building where the entrance is located could be differentiated to a highlight the entry, using glazing to indicate a greater height at the entry, and/or reducing or eliminating the balcony at the third floor.

What's/Who’s To Blame For "Bad" Building Design In SF? [SocketSite]
Damn All Those Untalented Architects To Hell! Oh, Wait A Minute… [SocketSite]
Damn That Planning Department To Hell! Oh, Wait A Minute… [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 5:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

February 19, 2013

San Francisco Giants Sign Anchor Brewing To Mission Rock Team

Anchor Brewing on Pier 48

The San Francisco Giants have signed Anchor Brewing to renovate San Francisco's Pier 48 and build new brewing, shipping, drinking, eating and educational facilites on the site, a true anchor tenant for the Giants' massive Mission Rock Development.

The new Anchor facility will feature production facilities for brewing, distilling, packaging, storing, and shipping; a restaurant, museum and educational facility in the headhouse of Pier 48; and a restored walkway around the entire pier apron that will connect pedestrians to the Portwalk and allow views into the Anchor brewhouse. Anchor will offer tours of the facilities and educational seminars with a focus on the history of craft beer, the art of craft distilling and Anchor’s history in San Francisco.

While the 27-acre Mission Rock development will likely take a decade to finish, Anchor could be up and brewing on Pier 48 by the end of 2016, quadrupling current production from 180,000 to 680,000 barrels a year.

Anchor Brewing Pier 48 Interior

Giants Moving Forward With Massive "Mission Rock" Development [SocketSite]
Anchor Brewing to Quadruple Production with New Facilities on Pier 48 [anchorbrewing]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

February 15, 2013

An Eleven Million Dollar Mansion Is Under Wraps Above The Haight

181 Buena Vista Avenue East (www.SocketSite.com)

Former United States Ambassador James Hormel quietly sold his 8,000 square foot San Francisco mansion at 181 Buena Vista Avenue East for $7,200,000 early last year.

While Hormel extensively remodeled and expanded the Buena Vista mansion which sits on a massive 13,555 square foot lot in the late 1980’s, the home is now undergoing a complete interior transformation led by Butler Armsden Architects.

181 Buena Vista Avenue East Aerial

And while the cost of the renovation per the building permits totals $775,000, rumor has it that the budget for the project is actually closer to $4 million, a budget which might include the 24 hour security detail that has been trying to keep the renovation under wraps.

With respect to the new owner of 181 Buena Vista Avenue East, according to our sources that would be the co-founder of Pivotal Labs which was acquired by EMC in an all cash deal two months before the pad was purchased in an all cash deal as well.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

Mercy Me: Hugo Hotel Is Historically Significant, The Plan To Mitigate

200%206th%20Street%202013.jpg

In order for Mercy Housing to move forward with their plans to build a new nine-story residential building with 67 affordable housing units on the corner of 6th and Howard Streets, they need permission to raze the existing Hugo Hotel and Defenestration.

Situated in the middle of the newly defined "6th Street Lodginghouse Historic District," the Hugo Hotel has been deemed a contributing resource for the District and the Mayor’s Office of Housing (MOH) "has determined that the proposed [project] would result in an adverse effect, due to the demolition of 200 6th Street."

200 6th Street Rendering (www.SocketSite.com)

There is, however, a plan to address the adverse effect and allow Mercy to move forward:

To address the adverse effect on 200 6th Street (aka Hayston Apartment Building), MOH would execute a Programmatic Agreement with the [State Historic Preservation Officer] that would require mitigation of the adverse effects of the undertaking. These mitigation measures are designed to address the adverse effects on the historic architectural resources and include the following:
1. Historic American Building Survey (HABS) documentation consisting of a written historical report and archival photographic documentation; and,
2. An interpretive exhibit featuring the history of the site, previous buildings on the site and surrounding historical context. The purpose of the interpretive exhibit is to commemorate the significance and history of the site, the impacted historic resources and the district.

San Francisco’s Historic Planning Commission will weigh in on the proposed measures to mitigate the adverse effect of razing the Hugo Hotel next week.

Redeveloping Sixth Street: Corner Of Sixth And Howard As Envisioned [SocketSite]
The Hugo Hotel Has A Date With A Different Kind Of Bench [SocketSite]
Hugo Hotel's Flying Furniture Update, No Word On The Graffiti [SocketSite]
South of Market Resource Survey Says…Five New Historic Districts [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (39) | (email story)

February 14, 2013

Muni Will Pay $131,250 Per Month To Lease The Pagoda Theater Site

North Beach Pagoda Theater (Image Source: MapJack.com)

As we reported last week:

While Muni has a plan to demolish the derelict Pagoda Theater and extract the Central Subway tunneling machines from the North Beach site rather than digging up Columbus Avenue for the task, they don't yet have a lease. As such, the Planning Commission's scheduled vote to approve the plan has been delayed by at least a week while Muni and blighted building owner Joel Campos continue to negotiate.

Not exactly negotiating from a position of strength, Muni has agreed to pay Campos $3.15 million in rent for a 24-month lease. In addition, Muni will pay for the demolition of the Pagoda Theater and ask San Francisco's Planning Commission to declare the site a Special Use District, clearing the way for the five-story Palace at Washington Square to rise.

Pagoda Theater Rendering 2010

Pagoda Theater Demolition Vote Delayed Until Muni Has A Lease [SocketSite]
Demolition Of Derelict North Beach Pagoda Theater Set For Approval [SocketSite]
A Plan For San Francisco's Central Subway To Stop In North Beach [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (17) | (email story)

February 13, 2013

Orchard Supply Hardware Coming To SoMa If Approved

While it took over a decade to get a new home improvement store out on Bayshore Boulevard, with the backing of the Planning Department, Orchard Supply Hardware is hoping to get a quick approval to convert the Pacific Sales building at 975 Bryant into a 33,000 square foot OSH with a plant nursery on the roof (click on any image to enlarge).

Other proposed changes to the building at 975 Bryant include landscaping, a new Bryant Street entrance, and a change of windows along Bryant Street to increase transparency:

And while not in the "urban core," the location is in the heart of San Francisco.

T-Minus Two Days (And A Decade In The Making) For Lowe’s In SF [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

February 11, 2013

Four Stories Are Falling At Mission And Fremont, Thirty Ready To Rise

350 Mission Street Demolition (www.SocketSite.com)

As we first reported this past October, the permits to demolish the existing four story Heald College building at 350 Mission Street and construct a 27-story office tower reaching 350 feet on the site were issued with work slated to start early this year:

350 Mission Rendering

In December, Salesforce announced it signed a 14 year lease for the entire tower to rise including an additional 3 floors for a total of 30 stories and 400 feet on the site that was up-zoned to 700 feet. And with the first chunks taken last week, the demolition of the Heald College building is now well underway.

350 Mission Street: Permits Issued For 350-Foot Tower To Rise [SocketSite]
Salesforce Signs Deal To Occupy Entire 350 Mission Street Tower [SocketSite]
Planning’s Towering Transit Center District Plan Decision: Approved [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

A Billion Dollar Proposal To Rebuild SF’s Two Busiest BART Stations

A third of BART’s daily riders exit or enter the transit system at either the Embarcadero or Montgomery Street stations. With total ridership up six percent over the past year, now averaging 393,000 riders per weekday, BART directors are considering a plan to expand and boost the capacity of the Embarcadero and Montgomery Stations, a plan which would take five years and an estimated $900 million to complete.

No update on plans to connect BART with San Francisco's future Transbay Transit Center.

BART considers rebuilding 2 SF stations [SFGate]
Scoop: Transbay Interactive Map (And New Transit Center Website) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (43) | (email story)

February 8, 2013

Is 535 Mission Street Selling Itself And San Francisco Short?

535 Mission Street Massing

While some celebrate the news that construction on the 378 foot tower to rise at 535 Mission Street will soon recommence, others wonder if the developers aren't selling themselves and San Francisco short as the site is zoned for 550 Feet.

As massed above for SocketSite by steelblue, proposed and approved developments abound in the Transit Center District ("Mid-Market" ends at Fifth), with height limits recently raised to meet the growing demand for space and fund development of the area:

At 378 feet, 535 Mission will be dwarfed by the towers of 50 First Street on just the other side of Mission which are proposed to reach over 800 feet. Across City Park from 535 Mission, a 750 tower is now zoned to rise. And of course, the 1,070 foot Transbay Tower is just down the street at 101 First and Mission.

In the foreground above, the 700 foot tower at 181 Fremont rises amongst others.

Modern 27-Story Mission Street Tower Set For A Quick Restart [SocketSite]
More Mid-Market Development And Definition [SocketSite]
Planning’s Towering Transit Center District Plan Decision: Approved [SocketSite]
A Trio Of Renzo Piano SOM Towers At 50 First Street As Proposed [SocketSite]
Proposed 1,070-Foot Transbay Tower Approved To Rise [SocketSite]
Latest SF Skyscraper Scoop: 181 Fremont Redesigned And Rendered [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (29) | (email story)

Pagoda Theater Demolition Vote Delayed Until Muni Has A Lease

North Beach Pagoda Theater (Image Source: MapJack.com)

While Muni has a plan to demolish the derelict Pagoda Theater and extract the Central Subway tunneling machines from the North Beach site rather than digging up Columbus Avenue for the task, they don't yet have a lease. As such, the Planning Commission's scheduled vote to approve the plan has been delayed by at least a week while Muni and blighted building owner Joel Campos continue to negotiate.

Demolition Of Derelict North Beach Pagoda Theater Set For Approval [SocketSite]
A Plan For San Francisco's Central Subway To Stop In North Beach [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

February 7, 2013

The 5M Project's Buildings, Timing, And Public Open Space Plans

As we first reported yesterday, Forest City’s proposed 5M Project, as in Fifth and Mission, would yield over a million square feet of renovated or new office space, 750 new dwelling units, 150,000 square feet of ground floor retail, educational, and cultural uses, and 34,000 square feet of privately-owned publicly accessible open space down in SoMa with five new buildings ranging in height from 50 to 400 feet (click image above to enlarge).

A full rundown of the buildings and proposed renovations, including a two story addition to the Chronicle Building, the project timing, and an overview of the proposed open space:

Building M-1 (Chronicle Building): The interior layout of the Chronicle Building would be renovated and two partial floors would be constructed on top of the existing three-story building. Renovations to the Chronicle Building would include: 1) vertical addition of two partial floors; 2) a potential additional staircase for public access to a proposed rooftop open space area, and modifications to existing staircases to service the proposed rooftop area and meet tenant needs; 3) a potential increase in the number and location of pedestrian entrances and exits into the building on Minna and/or Mary Streets (where none currently exist); and 4) a new façade where the connection to the Examiner Building would be removed.

The renovated Chronicle Building would be a five-story, 80-foot-tall, 157,200 square foot office building. The two proposed additional floors would be set back from Mission and Fifth Streets, approximately 65 feet away from the existing clock tower at the front of the building. The rooftop area (on the top of the third floor) remaining after the addition of the two partial floors would provide up to 22,000 square feet of privately‐owned publicly accessible open space (provided to meet, in part, open space requirements for proposed residential and commercial buildings).

Building N-1: Located south of building M-1, Building N-1 would be a 28-story, 400-foot-tall building of 798,900 square feet. The ground floor would contain approximately 47,500 square feet of active ground floor retail/office/educational/cultural space. The remaining floors would contain 751,400 square feet of office uses.

The building base would be constructed to the lot lines on Natoma, Minna, and Fifth Streets and would define the street wall. Building N-1 would have varied floorplate sizes at its lower levels (1 through 4), midrise levels (5 through 10), and high-rise levels (11 through 28). The setback of the upper levels from the base street wall would be established in the Design for Development. The Camelline Building (430 Natoma Street) would be demolished to allow for the construction of Building N-1.

In addition, the existing two-story, 14,000-square-foot connector across Minna Street would be demolished and replaced with a single-story connector between Buildings M-1 and N-1. The proposed 1,600 square foot connector would be located approximately 65 feet above the existing street grade and would have dimensions of 40 feet by 40 feet (the existing connector is located approximately 16 feet above the existing street grade and has dimensions of 35 by 195 feet). The new pedestrian connector is intended to promote circulation between Buildings M-1 and N-1, including to and from the proposed rooftop open space on the renovated Building M-1.

Building H-2: Located at the southeast quadrant of Natoma and Mary Streets, Building H-2 would be an 11-story, 175-foot-tall building with 240,800 square feet. The ground floor of the building would contain 32,000 square feet of active ground floor retail/office/educational/cultural space. The remaining floors would contain 208,800 square feet of office space. The upper seven levels would be set back 30 feet from Howard Street.

N-1/H-2 Connector: The proposed N-1/H-2 Connector would be an eight‐story, 43,600 square foot connector over Natoma Street between Buildings N‐1 and H‐2, and would be located approximately 50 feet above the ground floor. The connector would have typical dimensions of 50 feet by 105 feet, spanning the 35‐foot width of Natoma Street and extending into the N‐1 parcel. The N‐1/H‐2 connector would contain office space.

Building N-3 (Dempster Printing Building): The existing four-story Dempster Printing Building located at 447 Minna Street would be rehabilitated to accommodate 12,000 square feet of office uses. Renovation would include alterations to the interior of the structure and potentially the exterior envelope (in the form of additional or modified entries). No vertical addition to the structure is proposed.

Building M-2: Located along Mission Street west of Building M-1, Building M-2 would be a 16-story, 165-foot-tall, 204,800 square foot building with 192,000 square feet of residential space above 12,800 square feet of active ground floor retail/office/educational/cultural space. The building would include approximately 260 residential units.

Building H-1: Located on the northwest quadrant of Fifth and Howard Streets, Building H-1 would be an approximately 38-story, 400-foot-tall, 373,000 square foot building with 360,800 square feet of residential space above 12,200 square feet of active ground floor retail/office/educational/cultural space. The building would include approximately 488 residential units.

Building N-2: Located to the west of Building N-1 and east of the central segment of Mary Street, Building N-2 would be an approximately three-story, 55-foot-tall, 18,200 square foot building. This building would contain multi-use arts/cultural/education uses.

Currently proposed to be constructed in two phases which could occur concurrently depending upon demand and financing, Phase 1 of the 5M project would include the following five components and is expected to take 48 months to complete, starting in 2015:

1. Demolition of three existing buildings located at 910, 912, and 924–926 Howard Street
2. Construction of Building M-2
3. Construction of Building H-2
4. Renovation of Building M-1 (Chronicle Building) and construction of two-story addition
5. Renovation and rehabilitation of Building N-3 (Dempster Printing Building).

Phase 2 of the 5M project would include the following four components and is currently slated to begin in 2018:

1. Demolition of the existing Examiner Building at 110 Fifth Street, the existing two‐story pedestrian connector between the Chronicle and Examiner Buildings, the existing Camelline Building at 430 Natoma Street, and the existing building at 190 Fifth Street
2. Construction of Building N‐1
3. Construction of Building H‐1
4. Construction of Building N‐2

In addition to the proposed 22,000 square feet of publicly accessible open space atop the renovated Chronicle Building, 9,750 square feet of open space to be known as "Mary Court" would serve as the proposed project’s central public space, created by vacating the existing Mary Street segment between Minna and Natoma Streets.

5M%20Project%20Open%20Space.gif

A portion of Building N-1 would cantilever over Mary Court which is envisioned to accommodate "events, workshops, and speaker series, hosted in part by adjacent tenants, as well as less formal interactions among residents, employees, and the public."

Chronicle Site Rendering: Minna Elevation

Forest City's 5M Project: Big Plans For 4 Acres At Fifth And Mission [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

A Five Million Dollar Pied–À–Terre In Pacific Heights

2006 Washington

Designed by Conrad Alfred Meussdorffer, the überexclusive building at 2006 Washington was designed to take advantage of 100 feet of open space to the west, facing the Golden Gate Bridge and overlooking the Spreckels Mansion in which Danielle Steele now resides.

2006 Washington Aerial (Image Source: Google.com)

Originally ten units, the 2,200 square foot penthouse atop 2006 Washington was separated from the tenth floor to create an eleventh. And while floors two through ten are 5,500 square foot, full-floor co-op apartments, unit number one on the first floor is "only" a two-bedroom, perhaps that’s why it’s been listed as "an elegant pied-a-terre defined."

2006%20Washington%20%231%20Kitchen.jpg

Purchased for $4,900,000 in March of 2009 according to Refin, the recently renovated 2006 Washington Street #1 is now back on the market and listed for $5,299,000. And yes, the building's Board must interview and approve the buyer.

∙ Listing: 2006 Washington Street #1 (2/2.5) - $5,299,000 [2006washington.com]
The Full Floor Plan Monty For 2006 Washington Number Four [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

February 5, 2013

There's Now A Fireplace On The 48th Floor

301%20Mission%20%2348B%20Living%20Room.jpg

The Millennium Tower at 301 Mission Street wasn't built with any fireplaces in place, but that didn’t stop the buyer of 301 Mission Street #48B from adding one. Purchased as new for $2,400,000 in February of 2010, the 1,664 square foot Grand Residence on the 48th floor was more or less gutted and rebuilt over the course of a year:

301%20Mission%20%2348B%20Library.jpg

In addition to the new alcohol burning fireplace surrounded by Bamboo granite, the second bedroom was reconfigured as a library with pocket doors to the living room and built-in Macassar Ebony cabinetry, behind which an electronically controlled Murphy bed is hidden.

301%20Mission%20%2348B%20Master%20Bath.jpg

The bathrooms now feature Equator Marble, Pierre Brun limestone and the Global glass wall tiles above. And while not yet officially listed, the corner unit with 11-foot, six-inch windows and some rather spectacular views of the city, bridge and Bay Lights is about to hit the market asking $4,500,000, just over $2,700 per square foot.

301 Mission Street #48B view

Full Disclosure: The listing agent for 301 Mission Street #48B advertises on SocketSite and provided a preview tour of the property but no compensation for this post.

∙ Listing: 301 Mission Street #48B (2/2.5) 1,664 sqft - $4,500,000 [millenniumviews.com]
The Millennium: A Few Things You Might Know (And A Few You Don’t) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

The Renovation Of 100 Van Ness And 400 New Rentals Are Underway

100 Van Ness Avenue

With demo work on the interior and exterior of 100 Van Ness Avenue underway, the Emerald Fund has filed a request to reduce the percentage of below market rate units in the building from 15 percent to 12 percent, a change which was principally approved by voters in San Francisco this past November with the passing of Proposition C.

Thanks to a revised curtain wall system, the renovation and re-skinning of the old AAA building will now yield 400 residential apartments over 6,884 square feet of ground floor retail and 112 off-street parking spaces with the garage entrance moved from Van Ness Avenue to Hayes Street.

100 Van Ness Avenue Rendering

One of Planning’s original conditions of approval for the project required "greater texture and depth in the glass curtain wall to reflect the new residential nature of the building" and "further refinement of the glass color to a lighter hue so it may more closely match the lighter colors that are typical of the nearby Beaux Arts core of the Civic Center area."

The exterior glass for the building will now resemble that of the Public Utilities Commission building at 525 Golden Gate Avenue and the Fund has proposed a number of Juliet balconies on all building facades as well as "a mixture of metal panels and projecting metal profiles to add texture and a greater residential expression to the structure."

Rendered 100 Van Ness Ready For Reality Check Tomorrow [SocketSite]
100 Van Ness Repurposed, Redesigned And Rendered [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (16) | (email story)

February 4, 2013

55 Laguna Set To Take A Step Forward By Preserving The Past

Woods%20Halls%20B%2BW.jpg

The proposed rehabilitation of Woods and Richardson Halls and redevelopment of the 55 Laguna campus, including the building of 413 new housing units and a park, is set to take a step forward this week as San Francisco's Historic Preservation Commission is slated to sign-off on the plan to document and selectively preserve the historic elements of the site.

55 Laguna Revised Site Plan

Included in the preservation plan, the WPA-era murals and mosaics, including Reuben Kadish’s "A Dissertation on Alchemy" in Woods Hall which has seen better days:

55 Laguna: The Revised Designs And Latest Development Scoop [SocketSite]
55 Laguna: The Latest Rehabilitation Plans And Progress [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

January 31, 2013

UCSF Seeking Developers For Their Prime 10-Acre San Francisco Site

UCSF Laurel Heights Campus (www.SocketSite.com)

UCSF's Chancellor's Executive Cabinet has approved the issuance of a Request for Proposals (RFP) to redevelop UCSF's 10-acre Laurel Heights campus at 3333 California Street, seeking to realize "the highest and best use of the site [and] maximize the value of the property." UCSF will be exploring options for relocating its 1,200 Laurel Heights employees to other campuses in San Francisco over the next couple of years.

The Laurel Heights campus which was first developed by the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company in 1955 and acquired by UCSF in 1985 encompasses an oversized city block, with fronts on California, Presidio, Masonic, Euclid, and Laurel Streets.

UCSF%20Laurel%20Heights%20Campus.gif

The campus site with a current 40-foot height limit is located in an RM-1 residential zone which permits approximately one dwelling unit per 800 square feet of land or one dwelling unit per 600 square feet of land if approved as a Planned Unit Development. There are 43,560 square feet per acre. The property could also be used for offices, which is the existing legal non-conforming use.

Proposals are tentatively scheduled to be due in May with a developer and plan set to be selected in June. The selected developer "will be capable of achieving entitlement approvals from the City as early as possible" with an expected time horizon of 4 to 10 years to complete the development.

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (34) | (email story)

January 28, 2013

Apple Has Reportedly Set Their Sights On This Castro Street Site

400 Castro Street

The word on the street is a 50% jump in rent was to blame for effectively chasing Diesel from their 400 Castro Street location at the corner of Market. And if a plugged-in tipster is correct, Apple has their sights set on the space with plans to develop the old Bank of America building into an iconic Apple Store which would be the fourth in San Francisco.

As Apple hasn’t commented, we'll have to consider it a rumor for now.

UPDATE (1/30): Apple Rumor Busted But In Part Confirmed As Well.

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (40) | (email story)

January 24, 2013

Concourse Hall Redevelopment Could Finally Kickoff In 2013

801%20Brannan%20Rendering%202013.jpg

Plans for over 800 new housing units to be built at 801 Brannan (the current site of the Concourse Exhibition Hall) and One Henry Adams are up for approval by San Francisco's Planning Commission this afternoon.

801%20Brannan%20Rendering%202%202013.jpg

As we first reported about the project back in 2010:

The proposed development of 801 Brannan and One Henry Adams (click rendering to enlarge) has been in the works for over ten years, at one point hoping to be delivered in 2008 (and then 2010). The development would raze four buildings across two sites.

Rising on the sites would be five six-story/sixty-eight-foot buildings with up to 819 residential units over ground floor retail and 798 parking spaces. In terms of unit mix: 455 one-bedrooms, 315 two-bedrooms, 20 three-bedrooms, and 29 lofts as proposed.

A revised plan now calls for four buildings with up to 821 units (107 studios, 319 one-bedrooms, 316 two-bedrooms, 69 three-bedrooms, and 10 lofts), up to 150 of which would be affordable. And in terms of parking, the project has been redesigned with 682 spaces for cars (including 6 for carshare) and 729 spaces for bikes.

The project would also yield 50,000 square feet of ground floor retail/commercial and 70,000 square feet of open space, at least two-thirds of which would be publicly accessible and includes the "Market Mews" off Brannan:

801%20Brannan%20Rendering%20Market%20Mews%202013.jpg

801 Brannan And One Henry Adams: 819 Units As Proposed [SocketSite]
Preliminary Designs For 801 Brannan On The Boards [SocketSite]
Plans For 800 New Showplace Square Units Moving Forward [SocketSite]
Plans For 800 New Showplace Square Units Moving Forward [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

Woodside Home Sells For $117.5M? Second Most Expensive US Sale?

While never publicly listed for sale, according to public records and SFLuxe, financier Tully Friedman's nine-acre Woodside estate at 360 Mountain Home Road sold for $117,500,000 this past November, a sale which would make it "the most expensive private residence in California, and the second-highest price paid for a home in the United States."

360 Mountain Home Road

In 2008, the adjacent 3.4 acre parcel at 330 Mountain Home Road (the brown patch to the right in the aerial above which has since been developed) sold for $5,500,000, suggesting a rather hefty premium for Friedman's estate, assuming the $117.5M sale price is correct.

The purported premium paying buyer has yet to be disclosed. Tipsters?

Woodside Home Sells for $117,500,000 [sfluxe.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (21) | (email story)

January 18, 2013

San Francisco's Historic <1 Percent And Eleven Landmark Districts

Since 1967, roughly 260 individual structures have been designated as San Francisco Landmarks. And since 1972, eleven Landmark Districts have been designated throughout the City, including 85 city blocks and a total of 1,132 parcels, the exteriors of which are now regulated by Article 10 of San Francisco’s Planning Code.

With roughly 180,000 property parcels in the City and County of San Francisco, less than 1 percent of the City’s parcels are currently Landmarked, a number that is likely to be too high for some and too low for others.

The eleven Landmark Districts in San Francisco and a twelfth which is in the works:

1. Jackson Square Landmark District
Bounded by Broadway, Sansome, Washington, and Columbus Avenue and designated in 1972, San Francisco’s earliest surviving commercial area features commercial and mixed-use buildings, predominately brick, erected in the 1850s to 1860s. Buildings are typically two- to three-stories with commercial uses at the high ground story. Blocks: 8 Parcels: 82

2. Webster Street Landmark District
Bounded by Jackson, Buchanan, Fillmore, and Clay Streets and designated in 1981, this residential historic district in the Western Addition features a unified collection of builder-developed residences designed in the Italianate style. The single-family residences and duplexes were designed for middle-income home buyers. Blocks: 3 Parcels: 25

3. Northeast Waterfront Landmark District
Bounded by Greenwich, Embarcadero, Montgomery Street, and Broadway and designated in 1983, this commercial and industrial historic district reflectswaterfront storage and maritime activities, from the Gold Rush era to World War II. It features a large collection of warehouses and industrial buildings constructed of brick and reinforced concrete. Blocks: 9 Parcels: 53

4. Alamo Square Landmark District
Bounded by Golden Gate Avenue, Divisadero, Webster, and Fell Streets and designated in 1984, this large residential historic district is clustered around Alamo Square in the Western Addition. It features richly ornamented houses and flats, designed in a range of Victorian- and Edwardian-era styles, primarily for businessmen and the upper-middle class home buyer. Alamo Square Park is also a contributing feature. Blocks: 16 Parcels: 281

5. Liberty Hill Landmark District
Bounded by 20th, Mission, Dolores, and 22nd Streets and designated in 1985, this Mission District historic district features Victorian-era residences designed primarily in the Italianate, Stick, and Queen Anne styles. It contains a mix of uniform developer built tracts for the working class and larger, custom-designed residences for middle-income home buyers. It includes mixed-use buildings, primarily along Valencia Street, that feature ground-level retail spaces. Blocks: 10 Parcels: 298

6. Telegraph Hill Landmark District
Bounded by Greenwich, Sansome, Montgomery, and Green Streets and designated in 1986, this eclectic hillside historic district features the largest concentration of pre-1870s buildings in San Francisco. The residential district features small-scale dwellings accessible only via narrow pedestrian-only lanes and staircases, as well as larger, iconic Modern buildings such as Richard Neutra’s Kahn House and the Streamline Moderne Malloch Apartment Building. Blocks: 6 Parcels: 90

7. Blackstone Court Landmark District
Bounded by Lombard, Franklin, Gough, and Greenwich Streets and designated in 1987, the significance of this tiny mid-block residential district is more historical than architectural. It is centered around the now-filled Washerwoman’s Lagoon. The lot lines, small houses, and location on a pre-Gold Rush trail present a unique physical expression of pre-1906 development in the Marina District. Blocks: 1 Parcels: 4

8. South End Landmark District
Bounded by Stillman, First, Ritch, and King Streets and designated in 1990, this industrial and warehouse historic district features a collection of single- and multi-story warehouses. Constructed of brick and reinforced concrete, the warehouses are associated with maritime and rail activities. The majority of buildings were erected between 1906 and 1929. Blocks: 6 Parcels: 84

9. Bush Street Cottage Row Landmark District
Bounded by Bush, Webster, Fillmore, and Sutter Streets and designated in 1991, the historic district is comprised of residential buildings – primarily of flat front Italianate and Stick design – plus a walkway and a small park. Located in the Japantown neighborhood, the buildings are relatively small-scale and a uniform two-stories in height. In the 1930s, the walkway was commonly known as “Japan Street” due to the neighborhood’s large population of Japanese-American residents. Blocks: 2 Parcels: 23

10. Civic Center Landmark District
Bounded by Market, Fell, Franklin, Golden Gate and Jone and designated in 1996, the Civic Center historic district consists of monumental institutional buildings flanking a central open space, as well as nearby large-scale commercial and apartment buildings. Civic Center institutional buildings are unified in a Beaux Arts Classical design, described as “American Renaissance.” The Civic Center Plaza is a contributing feature. Blocks: 15 Parcels: 61

11. Dogpatch Landmark District
Bounded by Mariposa, Tubbs, 3rd, and Indiana Streets and designated in 2003, this historic district features the oldest enclave of industrial workers’ housing in San Francisco. It is located to the east of Potrero Hill in the Central Waterfront district. The small-scale Victorian-era cottages and flats housed workers from the shipyards and maritime-related industries of the adjacent Potrero Point. Also included are several industrial, commercial and civic buildings. Blocks: 9 Parcels: 131

And the twelfth district which is in the works and includes four blocks and 87 parcels: Duboce Park.

San Francisco’s Contentious Twelfth Landmark District: Duboce Park [SocketSite]
List of San Francisco Designated Landmarks [wikipedia.org]
ARTICLE 10: Preservation of Historical Architectural/Aesthetic Landmarks [amlegal.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

January 17, 2013

Pier 70 Plans Unveiled Including 1,000 New Housing Units

Pier 70 Project Area

Forest City has unveiled their plans for the redevelopment of the 69-acre Pier 70 site with a proposal for over two million square feet of office space, 275,000 feet for "artisans, retailers, designers, and boutique manufacturers," and up to 1,000 new housing units.

Pier%2070%20Slipway%20commons.jpg

From the Business Times with respect to the plan:

While much of the proposal carries out ideas cultivated at Forest City’s 5M project at Fifth and Mission, the inclusion of housing is surprising because the Port of San Francisco had previously said that residential development at the site would conflict with the noisy ship repair businesses that flourish on the pier. But Forest City has circumvented the conflict by placing the housing as far from the ship operations as possible and has been working closely with BAE Systems, which operates the facility, the largest floating dry dock on the U.S. West Coast.

Phase one of the project, which would commence in 2016, includes the conversion of the hisoric 100,000-square-foot Building 2 into about 100 units of housing and the conversion of the historic 160,000-square-foot Building 12 into "a loft-style creative office building with a ground floor marketplace that spills out into the public plaza," the Market Square.

pier%2070%20Market%20Square.jpg

Office and residential components of the project would be concentrated to the north and south of the site with new buildings rising up to 235 feet, while a public promenade would be built along the bay, part of San Francisco’s Great Blue Greenway Project.

Pier%2070%20Slipway%20Promenade.jpg

Now Calling All Developers For San Francisco’s Pier 70 [SocketSite]
Forest City Receives Port Staff’s Final Pier 70 Rose [SocketSite]
Forest City unveils Pier 70 plan [bizjournals.com]
Testing The Waters To Develop Four Infill Acres At Fifth And Mission [SocketSite]
San Francisco's Great Blue Greenway Vision And Interconnected Plans [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

January 14, 2013

Behind The Scenes At 21 Buena Vista Avenue

21 Buena Vista Avenue Living

While not available last week when we first reported the Victorian's return, the latest and greatest listing photos for the Witches Hat at 21 Buena Vista Avenue are now online.

21%20Buena%20Vista%20Avenue%20Kitchen.jpg

Comments: The Witches Hat (21 Buena Vista Avenue) Is Back [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | (email story)

Autodesk Slated To Takeover And Makeover Most Of Pier 9

Pier 9

The past September San Francisco’s Port Commission approved a five year lease and $3 million improvement program for Autodesk to renovate and occupy 8,391 square feet on San Francisco’s Pier 9. This week, the lease is slated to be expanded to 27,190 square feet for ten years with a minimum of $7 million in planned improvements.

Pier 9 will house Autodesk’s consumer products division, including the newly acquired Instructables, occupying space which was mostly functionally obsolete or vacant.

Autodesk will be paying $55,444.00 per month ($2.25 per square foot for existing office space, $1.25 per square foot for currently unimproved shed space) with a 3 percent annual increase in rent on the Pier, a rate which was not competitively bid by the Port and will require San Francisco's Board of Supervisors' blessing this week.

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

January 9, 2013

The Witches Hat (21 Buena Vista Avenue) Is Back

21 Buena Vista Avenue 2013

Asking $5,475,000 in 2006 and then relisted and reduced a number of times to $3,900,000 over the next year, the 8,229 square foot "Witches Hat" at 21 Buena Vista Avenue ended up selling for $3,875,000 in December of 2007.

Returned to the market as a rental in 2009 asking $17,500 a month, the six bedroom home with 4 floors, 22 rooms, 1700 square feet of gallery space and a 3000 bottle wine room is now back on the market and listed for $6,500,000 in 2013.

While the current listing doesn't yet feature any interior photography and the property has been repainted, likely inside and out, a complete tour of how the Victorian mansion looked and was laid out back in 2006 remains available by way of the Wayback Machine.

UPDATE: Interior photos for 21 Buena Vista Avenue have been added to the listing.

∙ Listing: 21 Buena Vista Avenue (6/6) 8,229 sqft - $6,500,000 [21buenavista.com]
21 Buena Vista Returns With A Fifth (And Final?) Reduction [SocketSite]
21 Buena Vista Avenue ("The Witches Hat") Returns…As A Rental [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (29) | (email story)

December 21, 2012

Plans For 12 New Stories And Perhaps A Store Along Market Street

1125 Market Street Site

Real estate developer MacFarlane Partners has purchased the vacant lot at 1125 Market Street with plans to construct a 12-story apartment building on the Mid-Market site according to the Business Times.

Located directly to the east of the old Strand Theater at 1127 Market Street which the American Conservatory Theater (ACT) has plans to renovate, "the site could accommodate a 113,000 square foot building, in addition to 3,500 square feet of retail" but is not currently entitled.

The New ACT For The Shuttered Strand Theater On Market Street [SocketSite]
MacFarlane Partners grabs vacant Mid-Market development site [Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 5:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

December 17, 2012

Putting Lipstick On The Red-Tagged Pig Of Pier 38?

Pier 38

Bids to rehabilitate the Pier 38 bulkhead structure and a portion of the Pier 38 shed, the pier from which a whole host of startups and two venture capital firms were evicted last year, are now being sought with a deadline of February 22, 2013 to respond.

From a plugged-in tipster who attended the pre-bid conference last week and questions the Ports direction and approach:

The Port Commission directed the Port staff to get the front part of the pier (the "bulkhead building") re-tenanted as soon as possible. If the Port had recovered from the previous tenant debacle and resolved two issues - litigation over an outstanding loan against the previous lessee and the removal of three boats parked illegally at Pier 38 - they could conceivably move forward with developing the whole pier.
As it stands, it’s kind of half-baked (at the direction of the Port) because respondents are being asked to develop the front of something while kind of ignoring the back half. Oh, and the respondents can "optionally" submit qualifications for developing the whole pier.

In the opinion of our tipster, the Port "should seek resolution on the outstanding issues so Port staff can create a complete development package, rather than put lipstick on a pig through a large tenant improvement." Feel free to proffer an opinion of your own.

Pier 38 Bulkhead Rehabilitation Project RFP [sfgov.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

December 14, 2012

Designs For A 350-Foot Tower To Rise At 75 Howard Street

75 Howard Site

As we wrote a year ago, an application had been filed to raze the eight-story and 550 space parking garage at 75 Howard Street and build a 284-foot building with 160 condos.

We now have the details and design for the proposed tower, the height of which has risen to 350 feet and 31 stories with 186 condos over a ground floor restaurant, café, and 175 underground parking spaces accessed from Howard Street.

The project also includes landscaping and paving improvements, resulting in a new 4,780 squre foot landscaped and publicly accessible open space in the triangle at the end of the block. Steuart Street south of Howard would be narrowed and on-street parking would be eliminated along with the turnaround bulb at the southern terminus of the street.

75 Howard Street Site

The proposed 31-story tower's design consists of two main elements, a horizontal podium surmounted by a vertical tower:

75 Howard Street Elevation

The 7-story (82-foot-tall) horizontal podium element would be built to its Howard Street (north) and Steuart Street (east) property lines, and it would be set back from the south property line by about 18 feet and from the west property line by about 3 feet. The podium element would measure about 153 feet from east to west and 116 feet from north to south. The ground and second stories would be recessed about one to six feet from the wall plane of the podium above, forming a high, continuous band of glazing at the ground floor and second floor across a portion of the north façade, all of the east façade, and part of the south façade. These setbacks are intended to define a transparent, pedestrian-oriented ground and second floor, with a horizontal podium volume above, provide additional sidewalk space along Howard Street and Steuart Street, and provide additional space for the café garden and common open space along the south façade.
The 24-story vertical tower element together with the 7-story podium would rise a total of 31 stories (350 feet tall, plus an additional 6 feet for rooftop screening and mechanical enclosures). The tower element would be nearly square in plan, measuring about 114 feet from east to west and 109 feet from north to south. It would be set back from the podium element below by about 2 feet from the podium’s north façade, 23 feet from the podium’s east façade, 5 feet from the podium’s south façade, and 16 feet from the podium’s west façade. However, floor 8 (the terrace level), the lowest floor within the tower element, would be further set back from the tower wall plane above it along the north and south facades to accentuate the transition between the podium and tower elements and to articulate each of these elements as distinct from each other.

The building would likely be clad in glass and stone (granite or limestone), ranging from light to medium grey. Two variants for the proposed tower are also on the boards, a Public Parking Variant and a proposed Residential / Hotel Mixed Use Variant.

The proposed Public Parking Variant would provide an additional 96 non-accessory public off-street parking spaces, for a total of 271 parking spaces, to partially offset the 550 public spaces lost by demolition of the 75 Howard Garage. All 271 parking spaces would be located in stacked mechanical spaces on Basement Level 2 within the proposed 26,701-gsf parking garage.
The proposed Residential / Hotel Mixed Use Variant would provide a mix of residential units and hotel rooms within the high-rise tower. Hotel rooms would be located on floors 3 through 7 and floors 10 through 12, and residential units would be located on floors 13 through 31. This variant would also include space on floors 8 and 9 for hotel registration, a hotel restaurant, spa services, and other hotel amenity space. Under this variant, approximately 109 residential units and 82 hotel rooms with associated hotel amenity space would be constructed.

As always, we'll keep you posted and plugged-in.

UPDATE: As a plugged-in reader quickly notes, the 75 Howard site is currently zoned for up to 200 feet and implementation of the proposed project would require the adoption of legislative amendments to reclassify the height limit to 350 feet.

We’ll also add the unit mix of the proposed project includes 16 studio units, 39 one-bedroom units, 97 two-bedroom units, 29 three-bedroom units, and 5 four-plus bedroom units.

From Parking To 160 Condos At 75 Howard Street As Proposed [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

December 12, 2012

Sponsors Of The 1601 Larkin Street Development Try, Try Again

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

San Francisco’s Planning Commission first disapproved of the proposal to demolish the dilapidated church at 1601 Larkin Street and construct a new six-story building with 27 condos and 29 off-street parking spaces on the site back in 2010.

1601 Larkin Rendering as Proposed

The Commission cited several specific reasons for its disapproval at the time, including:

1. The project would result in an abrupt change in scale compared with existing buildings in the vicinity.
2. The massing of the project was not sculpted to appropriately transition to adjacent lower building or to reflect the underlying topography.
3. The design did not sufficiently break the apparent scale of the building into discrete elements to a degree that justified the requested bulk exceptions.
4. The project proposed a palette of finish materials that includes glass, concrete, and bays wrapped in metal screens that contrasted with the typical finishes found on other buildings in the area, which area generally characterized by warm materials such as wood, brick, or stucco.
5. The project would result in the demolition of an historic resource (the existing church).

Having kicked the proposed Stanley Saitowitz design to the curb, the project sponsors returned to the Planning Commission six months ago seeking approval for a much less modern design featuring "revised massing, architectural language, and finish materials."

1601 Larkin Rendering

With the Planning Department flip-flopping on its previous recomendation for the project, the Planning Commission formally rejected the revised proposal in August, "reiterating many of [their] previous concerns with the mass and scale."

Working with members of the public and Planning Department, the project sponsors have once again returned with a revised design. And while the revised-revised design is similar to the last proposal, there are a couple of key aspects which have changed:

1601%20Larkin%20Rendering%202013.jpg

The height of the proposed development has been reduced by one story to a maximum roof height of 55 feet with modified setbacks, including 3- and 4-story elements along the streetscape. New colors and materials have been added to the facade. And a ground-floor community room has been added as well.

Seeking input from the Commission prior to another formal rejection ruling, the revised-revised design for 1601 Larkin will be informally presented to the Commission this week with the project sponsors now plannig to pursue a formal approval early next year.

1601 Larkin: Planning's Flip-Flop And Expected Disapproval Today [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Two (Or Three) [SocketSite]
Praying For/From One Big Penthouse Atop 1601 Larkin As Proposed [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Three (Or Four) [SocketSite]
Development Of 1601 Larkin Disapproved By Planning Commission [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin: Comments, Responses And Latest Renderings [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

December 10, 2012

2901 Broadway Sells For $28,250,000 And The City Seriously Benefits

2901 Broadway

After 2,058 days on the market, the sale of 2901 Broadway closed escrow on Friday with a reported contract price of $28,250,000 to become the third most expensive single-family home to have ever sold in San Francisco.

The transfer tax paid to the City at the time of the sale should have been $712,500 and the annual property tax bill will now be around $330,000 a year, a little more than the $7,900 paid last year thanks to Proposition 13.

The most expensive home sale in the history of San Francisco remains 2840 Broadway at $33,000,000 while the penultimate position belongs to 2950 Broadway at $29,500,000.

And yes, by most accounts 2901 Broadway is a fixer. Take a peek inside.

Will This Be San Francisco's Most Expensive Home By Year's End? [SocketSite]
The Confidential Sale Price For 2840 Broadway On Billionaire’s Row [SocketSite]
2950 Broadway Sells For $29,500,000 (And No, That's Not A Typo) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (53) | (email story)

December 7, 2012

Will This Be San Francisco's Most Expensive Home By Year's End?

2901 Broadway: Aerial

First listed for sale for $55,000,000 in 2007 having served as the 2007 Decorator Showcase Home, the seller of 2901 Broadway received a rumored four offers that year, all of which were countered at asking and all of which walked away.

Having been on the market since and reduced a number of times, most recently to $34,000,000 four months ago, the Gold Coast mansion is in escrow and slated to be sold by the end of the year according to a couple of plugged-in sources who also say the buyer is local, the identity of whom we can’t yet confirm.

If 2901 Broadway sells for within 3 percent of its current list price, it will become the most expensive home ever sold in San Francisco, relegating 2840 Broadway to the penultimate position at $33,000,000.

As plugged-in people know, 2845 Broadway which was listed for $38,500,000 and had a shot at the title ended up selling for $20,000,000 last month, unless a major miscalculation or other tomfoolery by San Francisco's Assessor Recorder's office is in play.

And yes, the city will be a big beneficiary of the sale of 2901 Broadway as the property tax bill for the Gold Coast mansion totaled $7,790 last year. The transfer tax alone on this sale should be over half a million dollars and the tax bill should be over $200,000 a year.

Go Ahead And Ask: 2901 Broadway Is Listed (And Priced) [SocketSite]
Your Chance To Slip Inside 2901 Broadway [SocketSite]
Rumor Has It: Four Offers On The 2007 Decorator Showcase Home? [SocketSite]
With A Local Whale Landed, Another Mansion Is Reduced [SocketSite]
The Confidential Sale Price For 2840 Broadway On Billionaire’s Row [SocketSite]
The Massive 2845 Broadway Misses The Mark And Record Books [SocketSite]
Proposition 13 In Practice Along San Francisco’s Gold Coast [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

December 4, 2012

The Fort Mason Design Competition Finalists And Their Concepts

Fort Mason

As we reported earlier this year, while there’s currently no budget to implement the plans, invitations were sent to a select group of firms to participate in a design competition for "creative and practical" concepts to "enliven and integrate" the 13-acre waterfront campus that is San Francisco’s Fort Mason.

Designed by the military with gates and retaining walls to separate the Fort from the city, ideas for improving the Fort’s connection is a key element on which concepts were to be judged. And from the rough concepts submitted by invited firms, three finalists have been selected and their designs are now on display at the Fort Mason Center as well as online.

Fort%20Mason%20Public%20Market.jpg

The proposals include a full-time public market with an aerial transporter and bridge connecting the upper and lower parts of the Fort (the Bruner/Cott concept); floating swimming pools and bridges (the West 8 concept); and a reformed ship which would be permanently docked at the Fort as a floating hotel (the AMP Arquitectos concept):

Fort Mason Floating Hotel

Fort%20Mason%20Floating%20Pool.jpg

Each of the final three designs will be evaluated based on "design merit and the positive impact the proposal will have on the center," and a winner will be announced. But once again, at the moment they're not competing for anything other than bragging rights.

∙ Fort Mason Design Competition Finalist Designs: Bruner/Cott | West 8 | AMP Arquitectos
Creative and Practical Concepts To Enliven and Integrate Fort Mason [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

From Defunct To Potentially Delicious (Or Demolished?) In 2013

Marina%20Degaussing%20Station.jpg

While all eyes might be on, or perhaps trying to avoid, the naked protest planed for today’s Board of Supervisors meeting should the Board finalize the adoption of San Francisco’s new public nudity prohibition, the ten-year lease of the City’s Marina Degaussing Station down at the Marina Green is on the Board's agenda as well.

Marina Degaussing Station Renovation Rendering

The proposed lease for the 1,170 square foot Station, which the Woodhouse Fish Co. crew plans to turn into a seafood shack with both covered and uncovered seating, would run through 2022 with two potential five-year extensions.

Marina Degaussing Station Renovation Rendering

Built by the United States Navy in 1943, ownership of the Marina Degaussing Station was transferred to the City in the 1980’s and the station has sat vacant ever since. The renovation of the building will likely cost Woodhouse around $650,000 with an estimated effective rent to the City, including a percentage of revenue, of over $100,000 per year.

The renovation is expected to commence within four months of a lease being signed. And per the terms of the agreement, the restaurant would be required to serve "affordably priced and fresh food featuring seasonal and sustainable ingredients using organic products when possible" with minimum hours of operation between 11am and 7pm.

Assuming approvals and permits, the restaurant's opening is slated for summer 2013.

Opposing the project, however, the Marina Civic Improvement & Property Owners Association has delivered 201 signatures to the Board and is not only requesting that the lease be denied, but that the Station be demolished as well. And they're not the only neighborhood group nor neighbor that's opposed to the 75 seat operation:

Has anyone thought of the nuisance value this type of operation will bring? And what about the number of people it benefits? A very small number compared to the people who it will affect. The residents on Marina Blvd will have to live with this nightmare of noise, bright lights and litter 7 days a week!

No word on whether the above Marina resident is equally concerned about "the nuisance value" of the proposed 17,500 seat Warriors arena, but we wouldn't be surprised if not.

Proposed Lease Terms for the Marina Degaussing Station [sfbos.org]
San Francisco's Public Nudity Prohibition [sfbos.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

November 30, 2012

Picking Up The Slack For Six Million Dollars On Sacramento

2224%20Sacramento.jpg

Built on bedrock in 1891, the Slack Mansion at 2224 Sacramento Street survived the great quake of 1906. Commissioned by Judge Charles Slack, and having once served as a bed and breakfast, the eight thousand square foot home (not including a ground floor apartment), was purchased for $4,290,000 in 2005 and extensively remodeled since:

2224%20Sacramento%20Dining.jpg

2224%20Sacramento%20Kitchen.jpg

With five bedrooms, six baths and parking for eight (yes, eight), the 2224 Sacramento has just returned to the market listed for $6,250,000. Is it time to pick up the Slack?

∙ Listing: 2224 Sacramento Street (5/6) 7,893 sqft - $6,250,000 [2224sacramento.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

November 29, 2012

The Next Big Housing Thing To Define The New Mission

2558%20Mission%20Rendering.jpg

Plugged-in people have long known about the plans to renovate the New Mission Theater and develop the adjacent lot at 2558 Mission Street, upon which the Giant Value building currently stands. And now, the latest scoop for the modern Kwan Henmi designed eight-story building that’s proposed to rise on the project site, clad in metal, glass, and plaster with multi-colored panels and alternating inward and outward-angled windows:

2558%20Mission%20Rendered%20Facade.jpg

As proposed, the 2558 Mission Street building will be approximately 85 feet tall (measured from Mission Street with a 15 foot setback for the eight floor) with 114 residential units above 14,750 square feet of ground-floor commercial space and 89 parking spaces in a below-grade garage with its entrance on Bartlett.

2558%20Mission%20Rendered%20Alley.jpg

The ground floor would contain retail or restaurant uses, a mail area, a management office, building utilities, and two residential lobbies. The main lobby would be at the Bartlett Street entrance and a secondary lobby would be at the Mission Street entrance. The retail/restaurant space could house one large or up to three smaller tenants.

2558%20Mission%20Rendered%20North%20View.jpg

The residential units were designed to range in size from 520 square feet for the junior one-bedrooms to 1,400 square feet for the two-bedrooms. All 114 units (18 junior one-bedrooms, 45 one-bedrooms and 51 two-bedrooms) are planned to be offered for sale at market-rates. The city’s inclusionary housing requirement would be fulfilled by building below market rate (BMR) units on a separate parcel at 1296 Shotwell Street.

Of the eighty-nine parking spaces, eighty-six would be for the 114 residential units, a ratio of 0.75 spaces per unit. One parking space would be a car-share space and two parking spaces would be for the retail component. All parking spaces except for the car-share and handicapped-accessible spaces would be provided in two-level mechanical lifts. Parking for 41 bicycles would also be provided in separate, secure room in the garage.

Currently working its way through planning, once approved, the construction of the 2558 Mission Street building would take approximately 18 to 20 months versus 10 to 12 months for the renovation of the New Mission Theater.

Keep in mind that the Mission Anti-Displacement Coalition and a few others have long opposed the development of any market rate housing in the area.

As always, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

New Mission Theater Plans Moving Forward, Targeting 2013 Opening [SocketSite]
Giant Value Housing Or Headache To Come In The Mission? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (54) | (email story)

November 28, 2012

Calling All Warriors Willing To Bet On The Watermark And An Arena

501 Beale (www.SocketSite.com)

While a number of penthouses atop the Watermark at 501 Beale Street have gone back to the bank and sold for substantial discounts over the past couple of years, the 2,055 square foot Penthouse #1C on the 22nd floor at 501 Beale has just hit the market listed for $3,200,000 having been purchased as new for $2,300,000 in January of 2007.

501%20Beale%20%23PH1C%20Living.jpg

The northeast corner three-bedroom currently features "dramatic Bay, City, and Bay Bridge views," and would directly overlook the new Warriors arena and Seawall 330 developments.

Assuming, of course, that they are built below.

∙ Listing: 501 Beale Street #PH1C (3/2.5) 2,055 sqft - $3,200,000 [watermarkph1c.com]
Another Watermark Penthouse Returns To The Market Bank-Owned [SocketSite]
The Design For The Warriors San Francisco Arena On Piers 30-32 [SocketSite]
The Conceptual Details And Design Discussion For Seawall 330 [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

November 21, 2012

Traditional Thanksgiving Thoughts With An Untraditional Floor Plan

1067 Green Interior

With an octagonal floor plan, only one of two in San Francisco, and a totally tubular glass elevator, the only one of which we know, we break tradition and leave you for the holiday weekend with the listing for the landmark Feusier Octogon House at 1067 Green Street, the asking price for which has recently been reduced to $4,500,000.

Here's to hoping your pantry is plentiful and you're surrounded by family and friends. Safe travels if you're traveling. And as always, thank you for plugging in.

San Francisco Landmark #36: Feusier Octagon House (1067 Green Street) [noehill.com]
∙ Listing: 1067 Green Street (4/3.5) 5,267 sqft - $4,500,000 [octagonhousesf.com]
Warm Thoughts Of A Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner (2011 Edition) [SocketSite]
Warm Thoughts Of A Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner (2010 Edition) [SocketSite]
Warm Thoughts Of A Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner (2009 Edition) [SocketSite]
Warm Thoughts Of A Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner (2008 Edition) [SocketSite]
Conjuring Up Warm Thoughts Of A Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

November 16, 2012

The Historic Atherton House Is Headed For The Courthouse Steps

1990%20California%20Street.jpg

The Atherton House at 1990 California Street was built in 1881, commissioned by Dominga de Goni Atherton, widow of land speculator Faxon Dean Atherton after whom the town of Atherton down in San Mateo was named.

The house was subsequently divided into 12 apartments and landmarked in 1974, "despite the modifications, and notwithstanding the City Planning Commission's own objections to its fundamental lack of a cohesive style."

On the market in early 2007 asking $6,500,000 having been purchased for $1,670,000 in 1988, 1990 California failed to sell and was refinanced with a loan for $3,569,500 instead.

Currently in default with over $450,000 past due, the Atherton House was scheduled to hit the courthouse steps yesterday but a bankruptcy filing has delayed the foreclosure auction for at least another two weeks.

And yes, as was reported by a reader back in 2009, supposedly the house is haunted:

I lived with my then partner Edward Kitson in [the] Ballroom for 1 month back in the late 70's. Before we moved in we were asked by the then caretaker to stay in his apartment while he was away for a short time.
One very early morning we woke up and Edward had left the room, I remember rolling over in bed and there standing in a door way leading to a part of the house that was under construction was the blurry figure of a male figure. Non threating and still very sleepy I thought nothing of it.
It was not until the next day or so that we had found out that the mansion was possibly haunted and was told the story of George Atherton. I then remembered what I saw that morning and to this day I still believe I saw his ghost and from what I have read and now know, I know I did.

Boo.

The Atherton House (1990 California) [SocketSite]
The Atherton House: 1990 California [noehill.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

November 7, 2012

Presidio Parkway's Final Phase And Commissary’s Sporting Days

Presidio Commissary Site

With Phase II construction of the Presidio Parkway (a.k.a. the Re-envisioning of Doyle Drive) underway, next week the Presidio Trust will release a Request for Concept Proposals, seeking concepts for reusing the former Commissary and current Sports Basement site at Crissy Field as a cultural facility. The Trust is working with the Basement to find a permanent replacement location in the park.

Phase II construction of the Presidio Parkway is slated to continue through 2015 which includes construction of the Presidio Viaduct and Battery Tunnel, the Main Post Tunnels, the new Girard Road Interchange, and the final landscaping as watercolored above.

Presidio Parkway [presidioparkway.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (17) | (email story)

November 5, 2012

That Pier 70's Show: Developer Lined Up For The Historic Core

Pier 70 Project Area

With The Port having selected Forest City to lead the central Waterfront redevelopment of the 69-acre Pier 70 site last year, Orton Development has now been selected to lead the rehabilitation of the six historic buildings along 20th Street which form the "portal" to Pier.

Pier 70 Historic Core

The rehabilitation of the six buildings which includes the Bethlehem Steel Office Building (Building 101), the Powerhouse (Building 102), the Union Iron Works Office Building (Building 104), the Union Iron Works Machine Shop (Building 113/114), and the Union Iron Works Foundry & Warehouse (Building 115/116) could start as early as next spring with tenants by late 2014.

Pier 70 Building 115/116

Forest City Receives Port Staff’s Final Pier 70 Rose [SocketSite]
Let The Courting Begin For Pier 70’s Historic Core [SocketSite]
Plan to bring Pier 70 back to life [SFGate]
Now Calling All Developers For San Francisco’s Pier 70 [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

November 2, 2012

The Massive 2845 Broadway Misses The Mark And Record Books

2845 Broadway

As plugged-in people know, the two-parcel site which includes 2940 Pacific and upon which 2845 Broadway was built was purchased for $32 million in 2002, the cost of construction for the 17,500 square foot home and 6,000 square foot guest house has already reached $20 million, and the "buzz among brokers" is that it will cost another $8-16 million to finish.

And as we first reported last month:

While the listing for 2845 Broadway at $38,500,000 was quietly removed from the MLS without a reported sale last week, as a tipster notes, the unfinished Gold Coast property which is currently owned by the Sperlings is actually under contract to be sold.
Originally listed for $65,000,000 in 2006, if the sale of 2845 Broadway closes within 14 percent of its most recent list price it will be the most expensive home ever sold in San Francisco, relegating 2840 Broadway to the penultimate position at $33,000,000.

Unless a major miscalculation, fat finger error or tomfoolery by San Francisco's Assessor Recorder's office is in play, based on the recorded transfer tax paid, the copy of the deed we received pegs the sale price of 2845 Broadway at $20 million.

A $20 million sale is just a bit below the original $65 million ask, $18.5 million (48 percent) under its last list price, roughly $32 million less than has been invested in the property to date, and nowhere near the $33 million 2840 Broadway commanded.

In terms of the buyer, while we've heard various yammerings, the legal entity on the deed is Broadcliff LLC with a mailing address of a wealth manager out of Dallas, Texas. We can't yet officially confirm the individual hidden behind the LLC.

The Most Expensive Home Ever Sold In San Francisco Is... [SocketSite]
The $65,000,000 House [SocketSite]
Over $50 Million Invested And Now Asking $38.5M For 2845 Broadway [SocketSite]
Behind The Sperling’s Shocking "Sale" Of 2323 Hyde For $9,000,000 [SocketSite]
The Confidential Sale Price For 2840 Broadway On Billionaire’s Row [SocketSite]
The Political Case Of A 38 Percent Reduction In Property Tax Paid [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

November 1, 2012

Postcard Row On The Courthouse Steps

722 Steiner (www.SocketSite.com)

As we wrote about the San Francisco Postcard Row home at 722 Steiner in 2010:

First listed for $3,999,999 in February, reduced a few times, and last asking $3,199,000 before being withdrawn from the MLS in [September 2010], 722 Steiner has been relisted asking $2,950,000. And the listing now notes: "Seller MUST sell, will consider all offers."
Once again, Matthew Kavanaugh developed the 700 block of Steiner Street between 1892 and 1896, now known as San Francisco’s Postcard Row. Originally the developer's own home, 722 Steiner at Grove was slated for demolition in the 1970’s but survived and was restored.

In default since early 2011 on a $1,740,000 first mortgage from 2007 (hence the "Seller MUST sell, will consider all offers" note in 2010, a sale which never occured), 722 Steiner is once again scheduled to hit the courthouse steps tomorrow with $2,046,876 now owed on that first alone. A courthouse sale would wipe out a $290,000 second as well.

"Seller MUST Sell" 722 Steiner [SocketSite]
Postcard Row's Postman's Home Hits The Market (722 Steiner) [SocketSite]
722 Steiner: Reduced Again (By Postage For 750,000 Postcards) [SocketSite]
Somebody Get Gekko On The Phone... [SocketSite]
While A Big One Sells, Another Is Scheduled For The Steps [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

October 26, 2012

Square's Mid-Market To Mid-Market Move

1455 Market Street

Plans to add a "chef's kitchen and other amenities" for employees of Square are underway at 1455 Market Street, with the company's six block move from its current Mid-Market headquarters at Fifth and Mission to its future "Mid-Market" headquarters on Market between Tenth and Eleventh Streets expected to be executed by mid-2013.

1455 Market Street

1455 Market Street is directly adjacent to Crescent Heights' 749-unit development at 1401 Market Street which is rising right across Tenth Street from "Market Square," no relation.

1401 Market Rendering

More Mid-Market Development And Definition [SocketSite]
A Huge (Potential) Development For The Mid-Market/SoMa 'Hood [SocketSite]
1401 Market Street: Redesigned And Cleared For Construction [SocketSite]
1355 Market Square Scoop: Three New Restaurants And A Grocery [SocketSite]
Square signs lease for new mid-Market headquarters [squareup.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

October 22, 2012

Speaking Of Adding Floors And Altered Views: 680 Folsom Topped Out

680 Folsom: 10/2012

Speaking of adding floors and unprotected views, a reader wonders how much higher the soon to be re-skinned building at 680 Folsom Street will rise. Our answer: with two floors having been added atop the original twelve-story building, it goes no higher as the renovation has topped out at fourteen floors, although there will be mechanical above.

690 Folsom: Redesign Rendering

The renovated building which should be ready for occupancy by November 2013 will yield 505,000 square feet of office space and a public plaza on the corner of Folsom and Third Streets on which a new 15,000-square-foot retail or cultural building will also rise.

And of course, as the buildings at 680 and 690 Folsom Street previously appeared:

680/690 Folsom

Renovation Of 680/690 Folsom Slated To Get Going This November [SocketSite]
A Re-Skinning Crane Has Risen At 680 Folsom Street [SocketSite]
You've Been Warned: Let There Be Less Light And Fewer Views [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

October 18, 2012

Fifty Shades Of Saitowitz Grey

1234 Howard: Exterior

While Saitowitz designed buildings, such as 1234 Howard Street, typically feature many shades of grey, reactions to Saitowitz's modern aesthetic tend to be black or white.

1234 Howard #1A4 Living

Purchased as new for $899,000 in 2007, the kitchen within 1234 Howard Street #1A4 was rebuilt with Bulthaup cabinetry and high-end appliances, a mid-five figure investment at least, if we’re not mistaken, so it's not going to be an "apples-to-apples" here:

1234 Howard #1A4 Kitchen

The two-bedroom loft without doors between rooms, other than the bathrooms, is now back on the market and listed for $1,080,000. As we wrote in 2010 with respect to an apples-to-apples sale in the building: Design matters, whether you like it or not.

∙ Listing: 1234 Howard #1A4 (2/2) 1,295 sqft - $1,080,000 [sothebyshomes.com]
1234 Howard: The Budget To Build (Around $200 A Square Foot) [SocketSite]
A Modern Apple At 1234 Howard Defies The Commodity Condo Trend [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (21) | (email story)

October 11, 2012

Price Tag For YouTube Founder's Penthouse Pad: $8,000,000

The day after we broke the news, YouTube co-founder Steve Chen’s penthouse pad was quickly listed with two bedrooms, which includes "the game room" from which the pool table has been removed, and a price tag of $8,000,000 ($2,612 per square foot).

Comments: YouTube Co-Founder's Ritz-Carlton Penthouse Up For Grabs [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | (email story)

October 9, 2012

Coming Up Short (In More Ways Than One): The Crib Crib Closes

As we first reported in July:

Listed as a one-bedroom for $765,000 when The Hales Warehouse first hit the market in 2007, 410 Jessie #603 was purchased for $749,700 that July.
Having been unsuccessfully listed for $815,000 in 2009 and $799,000 in 2010, the 1,130 square foot condo is back on the market and listed as a short sale for $699,000 in 2012.
While newly listed as a "two bedroom," however, there appears to be a bit of childlike listing license in play with respect to this San Francisco crib.

The resale of 410 Jessie #603 closed escrow on Friday with a reported contract price of $675,000, ten percent ($74,700) under its 2007 sale price. The old floor plan for #603 to which a wall has been added to create "the crib room":

410 Jessie #603 Floor Plan

SF Cribs: Coming Up Short (In More Ways Than One) [SocketSite] 
New Listings For New Developments On The MLS [SocketSite]
Mint Lofts: 410 + 418 Jessie Street, San Francisco [SocketSite]
SF Cribs: Coming Up Short (In More Ways Than One) [SocketSite] 

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

October 8, 2012

Razing The Roof Over The Old Francisco Street Reservoir

Francisco Reservoir 10/2012 (www.SocketSite.com)

In early 2008, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission floated the idea of selling off the Francisco Reservoir to developers with hopes of getting as much as $50 million for the site which has sat unused for 71 years, an idea which was quickly sunk by neighborhood and local Supervisor opposition, not to mention a market turnabout at the end of 2008.

As we originally reported earlier this year, "while San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors passed a resolution reaffirming the reservoir’s status as open space, the resolution was non-binding, the site remains undeveloped and in disrepair, and the market for developable property is picking up."

While the wooden roof of the reservoir was razed last week, most likely to reduce the rotting hazard, the site remains in the possession of the SFPUC and no plans for the site, as open space or otherwise, are actively in the works as far as we know.

San Francisco's Planning Department once deemed the Market Street Safeway site "the single largest opportunity site [for redevelopment] outside of the Central Freeway parcels" in the Market-Octavia Neighborhood. The Francisco Street Reservior site is arguably the equivalent for Russian Hill.

San Francisco's Francisco Street Reservoir

Open Space Or Condos For The Francisco Reservoir? [SocketSite]
The SocketSite Scoop: Francisco Street Reservoir On The Market [SocketSite]
Planning's Conceptual Strategy For The Market Street Safeway Site [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (30) | (email story)

The Agent Won The Race (But Lost The War) Over On Berry Street

325 Berry Street #602

As we wrote in April:

In default since January 2011 when already $34,633 past due on a $727,920 first, and originally scheduled to first hit the courthouse steps last month but postponed, 325 Berry #602 is once again scheduled to hit the steps this afternoon at 2 pm.
Purchased for $910,000 in August of 2007 with 10 percent down, the 1,117 square foot Park Terrace one-bedroom has been listed on the MLS as a short sale for $749,000 and "in contract" for the past 352 days.
As always, we’ll let you know who closes first.

Having successfully postponed multiple foreclosure proceedings, the short sale of 325 Berry Street #602 finally closed escrow last week with a reported contract price of $702,000, twenty-three percent ($208,000) less than the agent paid for the condo back in 2007 prior to the building coming down with a case of new construction litigation.

Agent Versus Auctioneer: The Race Is On At 325 Berry [SocketSite]
Park Terrace: From New Condo Smell To Litigation Discount [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

October 5, 2012

Zynga's Business Is Now Worth Less Than Its Building

650 Townsend

Having cut projections once again, Zynga is currently trading at $2.32 a share for a market cap of $1.76 billion. With around a billion and a half dollars of cash on its books, however, Zynga’s enterprise value is currently $223 million, five million less than the $228 million it paid for its headquarters building at 650 Townsend in San Francisco earlier this year.

As we wrote in July when we broke the news of Pincus' Pacific Heights purchase:

While Zynga is currently trading at $5.57 per share, 44 percent under its IPO price of $10 per share, a few insiders including CEO Mark Pincus managed to dump over $500 million worth of Zynga stock at $12 per share in a secondary offering, the proceeds of which went into the insiders' pockets rather than the coffers of the company.

If the thought of Pincus having bought a home with its fortresslike qualities and security in mind seemed like a stretch, perhaps it seems like foresight now.

While Zynga Trades Down, Pincus Trades Up [SocketSite]
Will Zynga Be A One House Wonder? [SocketSite]
It’s Game On With A Hand Out As Zynga Demands Tax Breaks As Well [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (33) | (email story)

October 4, 2012

The New ACT For The Shuttered Strand Theater On Market Street

The Strand Theater

Constructed in 1917, the Strand Theater at 1127 Market Street has sat vacant and boarded up since 2003 when it was raided and closed down by the San Francisco Police Department, having last served as an adult video venue and haven for drug users.

Purchased by the American Conservatory Theater (ACT) earlier this year, ACT’s plans for renovating the four-story building on Market between Seventh and Eighth Streets are now making their way through Planning.

The existing floor plan and configuration of the building are as follows: The ground floor contains the lobby, movie screen, and main (orchestra) seating area/auditorium. The upper three floors do not extend the entire length of the building. The existing theater provides seating for approximately 1,100 people. The seating area includes rows of ground-floor orchestra seating and rows of seating in a partial second-floor balcony with its access from a marble-clad staircase in the center of the front lobby.
The proposed project includes building renovations to convert the former combination movie theater into a live performance theater, with associated rehearsal space/black box theater, costume and sound/ lighting facilities, offices, and a ground-floor cafe, for the American Conservatory Theater (ACT). The live performance venue would have 299 seats and would serve as a second stage venue for smaller productions and performances by ACT’s Master of Fine Arts Program students and other small theater companies.

The façade of the building will be repainted without any changes to the wall cladding while new windows and entrance doors will be installed on the ground floor and an 18-inch high awning with a 14-inch LED sign band will be installed along the front of the building.

The Strand Renovation Rendering

While we're all for the renovation of The Strand, we would have loved to have seen the major mix-use redevelopment that was once on the boards for the building brought to life:

1127 Market Massing (www.SocketSite.com)

1127 Market Street (The Strand Theater): Proposed Renovation Plan [sfplanning.org]
Have You Seen These Massings For 1127 Market? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

October 3, 2012

Timeline And Key Milestones For Building The Warriors Arena In SF

Piers 30-32 Stadium Watercolor

The official project schedule, key dates, and milestones for building an arena upon San Francisco’s Piers 30-32 for the Golden State Warriors in time for the 2017-18 NBA season with construction proposed to start in the summer of 2014 and finish three years later:

∙ October 2012: Homeowner Association Meetings and Public Outreach
∙ October 16, 2012: Conceptual Drawings, Framework and Fiscal Feasibility Presentation
∙ October 23, 2012: Port Commission Action on Framework and Fiscal Feasibility
∙ November 20, 2012: Board of Supervisors Action on Framework and Fiscal Feasibility
∙ November 21, 2012: Notice of Preparation for EIR issued by Planning Department
∙ December 2012 thru 2013: Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC)
Design Review Board (DRB) Hearings
∙ January/February 2013: Port Commission Hearing and Action on Term Sheet
∙ January/February 2013: Board of Supervisors Action on Term Sheet
∙ Summer 2013: Planning Commission Hearings: Environmental Impact Report (EIR)
∙ Late Fall 2013: Certification of EIR; adoption of Zoning and General Plan
Amendments and approval of Conditional Use permits if required
∙ January – April 2014: Board of Supervisors Action on Transaction Document
∙ January – April 2014: BCDC DRB Action on Project Design
∙ January – April 2014: BCDC Major Permit & Public Trust Consistency
∙ January – April 2014: Other regulatory approvals
∙ Summer 2014: Proposed Start Construction
∙ Summer 2017: Proposed Complete Construction

It's an aggressive schedule as proposed with little leeway for major legal challenges or NIMBY opposition to building upon the Piers and Seawall 330 at the base of 501 Beale.

501 Beale (www.SocketSite.com)

The Plans For A Legacy San Francisco Warriors Arena Upon The Piers [SocketSite]
Golden State Warriors Snag Snøhetta For Piers 30-32 Stadium Design [SocketSite]
Piers 30-32 Citizens Advisory Committee Tips Off Tonight [SocketSite]
Neighborhood Survey Says: Mixed Sentiments For Warriors Arena [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (53) | (email story)

October 1, 2012

Leticia’s Has Finally Fallen, Five Stories Set To Rise At 2200 Market

2200%20Market%20Street%20Site.jpg

The application to demolish the single story restaurant and surface area parking lot at the corner of Market, 15th and Sanchez Streets (most recently dba as Laticia’s) was first filed back in 2008. As a plugged-in commuter notes, the building has finally fallen.

On the site at 2200 Market Street, a five-story building with 22 residential units over two ground floor commercial spaces and underground parking has been permitted to rise.

2200-2210 Market: Rendering

As the building and site appeared when doing business as the Thai House back in 2008:

2200-2210 Market Street: Thai House (www.SocketSite.com)

Tearing Down The Thai House At 2200 Market To Add 22 Homes [SocketSite]
It's Rendering Thaim Time For 2200-2210 Market (Corner Of 15th) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (32) | (email story)

September 19, 2012

Groundbreaking Twin Peaks Tavern Recommended For Landmarking

Twin Peaks Tavern

An old Irish dive bar with its windows covered so that "wives couldn’t see their husbands drinking" when purchased by two lesbians in 1972, the windows of the Twin Peaks Tavern at 401 Castro and 17th Streets were uncovered, becoming the first openly gay bar in San Francisco to reveal, rather than obscure, the view and views of its patrons.

The first known gay bar to feature full length open plate glass windows, the Twin Peaks Tavern is a living symbol of the liberties and rights gained by the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered (LGBT) community in the second half of the 20th century…
Housed in a turn-of-the-century building with an intact 1923 Mediterranean Revival-style façade in the heart of the Castro, the bar retains its expansive windows and other character-defining features and continues to serve the LGBT community. The “U”-shaped bar is provided with a wooden foot rest, shaped wooden lip, and Formica top surface. Free-standing wood stools with vinyl upholstery surround three sides of the bar.

Twin Peaks Tavern Interior

The more elaborate back bar is a pre-Prohibition piece of furniture. The unpainted wood lower section provides for open storage of liquor bottles, as well as closed cabinets and drawers. The upper section consists of three large arched openings with mirrored backs. Each arch sits on a squat wooden column with a gilt plaster composite capitol. The arches are adorned with additional plaster ornamentation. Stained glass pendant lamps hang within each arched opening.

Along with the Doegler Building, the Planning Department's recommendation and case for the Twin Peaks Tavern to be designated as an official San Francisco Landmark will be considered by San Francisco's Historic Preservation Commission this afternoon.

The Prolific Henry Doelger And His Likely To Be Landmarked Building [SocketSite]
Article 10 Landmark Case Report: Twin Peaks Tavern (401 Castro)[sfplanning.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (29) | (email story)

Oh Thank Heaven For The Renovation Of 220 Battery

220 Battery

The little building at 220 Battery Street is owned by the Japanese company Kokubu Kensetsu Kogyo. And in the words of a plugged-in tipster, the building has been more or less "used as a public toilet since FedEx moved out."

Currently under renovation, it’s not a new tech company that’s moving in. In fact, they’re converting the space from office to retail. And if our tipster is correct, it’s a 7-Eleven that will fill the space and pump out copious amounts of snacks, sugar and caffeine.

There are over 1,700 7-Elevens in Tokyo and more stores in Japan (roughly 13,000) than in any other country. We counted fourteen in San Francisco.

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

September 18, 2012

The Prolific Henry Doelger And His Likely To Be Landmarked Building

The%20Doelger%20Building%201940.jpg

The Art Deco Doelger Building at 320-326 Judah Street was built in 1932, serving for two decades as the headquarters, warehouse and sales office for San Francisco builder extraordinaire Henry Doelger. A Streamline Moderne addition was added in 1940.

The%20Doelger%20Building%202012.jpg

Earlier this month, the Doelger building was purchased out of probate for $1,450,000.

A bit of background on the eccentric Henery Doelger and his building business that transformed San Francisco from Planning's Landmark Designation Report, a designation San Francisco's Historic Preservation Commission will consider initiating this week:

For two decades, beginning in the mid 1920s into the 1940s, merchant builder Henry Doelger constructed thousands of single‐family houses atop the sand dunes in San Francisco’s emerging Sunset District neighborhood. Pioneering mass construction house building techniques such as assembly‐line production, Doelger’s Sunset District houses rapidly transformed large swaths of southwest San Francisco...
Designed for middle‐income home buyers and built to Federal Housing Administration specifications, Doelger’s houses share near‐identical massing, floor plans, materials, and form, with differentiation provided by a profusion of facade styles. Doelger is widely considered San Francisco’s most prolific and significant merchant builder active during the pre‐War era. In 1946, the San Francisco Chronicle dubbed Doelger “the poor man’s Frank Lloyd Wright,” and his residential tracts are often affectionately referred to as Doelgerville and Doelger City.
Doelger’s financial success allowed him many personal luxuries and stories about him abound in the society pages of local newspapers. He collected cars, yachts, toupees, shoes, ties, and custom‐made sport coats. On Sundays the Doelgers often invited 10 to 40 of their friends to join them on their yacht. Nearly everyone knew Doelger, and some — especially columnist Herb Caen — derived some pleasure from hearing gossip about the millionaire.
Caen opined about a Doelger purchase in November 1954 writing, “Henry Doelger’s ’54 Cad El Dorado has 4,500 miles on it, so naturally he’s turning in the old wreck on a ’55. Gets it Wednesday.” He reported again three days later, “Henry Doelger not only bought the first ‘’55 El Dorado in town, he got a new Fleetwood, too. ‘For the nighttime,’ he explains patiently to the peasants.”
The Doelgers were known for their extravagant lifestyle and eccentric hobbies. Henry’s wife, Thelma, had a heart for stray animals and was drawn toward the exotic. The San Francisco Examiner reported in 1940 that the Doelgers’ pet deer, Timothy, had escaped and was wandering around 15th and Taraval Streets in the Sunset District. Construction workers employed by Doelger recognized the animal and he was returned home, where he was “welcomed by three Great Danes which [were] his constant playmates.”
In addition to the deer, the Doelgers also had pet monkeys. Herb Caen reported in 1949 that one of them, Chichi, broke several dishes and glasses in their home before biting Thelma, requiring her to get stitches. Following the incident, the family donated the monkey to the San Francisco Zoo.

The Planning Department recommends the Historic Preservation Commission approve the proposed designation of 320-326 Judah Street as a San Francisco landmark as the building "retains sufficient integrity to convey its association with a significant person, Henry Doelger; a significant event, the transformation of the Sunset District; and significant architecture, its Art Deco and Streamline Moderne design."

Henry Doelger [wikipedia.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

Is It Prime Time To Develop Muni's 5.4-Acre Presidio Yard?

Muni's Presidio Yard

With the redesign of Masonic Avenue in the works, Target on its way across the Boulevard, and money flowing for development projects in San Francisco, a reader can't help but wonder if now is the time for San Francisco's Municipal Railway to solicit proposals for the redevelopment of its Presidio Bus Yard bounded by Geary, Masonic, Euclid and Presidio:

Muni's Presidio Yard Aerial

While Muni can't operationally abandon the Presidio Yard, a commercial, retail, or housing development could be built over the centrally located and rather transit rich 5.4-acre site, an idea that has been floated in the past.

New Design For Masonic Avenue To Be Approved This Afternoon [SocketSite]
Targeting Spring 2013 For Unanimously Approved City Center Target [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

September 17, 2012

Academy Of Art University Back In The City's Crosshairs

In addition to their regularly scheduled meeting this week, San Francisco's Planning Commission will be quietly conferencing behind closed doors with legal counsel to once again discuss "whether to initiate litigation with respect to the Academy of Art University."

Having long ignored city laws, codes and ordinances with respect to the Academy's conversion of numerous San Francisco buildings to dormitory and classroom use without proper approvals or permits, last year the City considered legal action but failed to act.

According to the Office of the City Attorney, litigation is anticipated with the City as Plaintiff. Will this be the year that the City actually takes a (or the) stand?

Academy of Art About To Learn A Hard Lesson (Or Not)? [SocketSite]
And The Artists Shall Inherit Acquire San Francisco [SocketSite]
Planning Closes Its Doors To Discuss Academy of Art Litigation [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

September 14, 2012

Infinity Tower Two Duplex Gets A Third Bath (And Priced With A Three)

338%20Spear%20%2339C%20Deck.jpg

One of only a few duplex units in the two towers of the Infinity, 338 Spear Street #39C was purchased for $1,760,000 with three bedrooms and two and one-half baths in April 2010.

338%20Spear%20%2339C%20Kitchen.jpg

Last year, permits were issued to reconfigure and add a shower in the half-bath, and to add pocket doors between the bathroom, bedroom and living space on the main floor.

338%20Spear%20%2339C%20Guest%20Bath.jpg

Now sporting three full baths, a remodeled kitchen, and having recently been measured at 1,800 square feet inside and 470 square feet out, 338 Spear Street #39C is back on the market, but not yet listed, and priced at $3,200,000.

Full Disclosure: The listing agent for 338 Spear Street #39C advertises on SocketSite and provided a preview tour of the property but no compensation for this post.

∙ Listing: 338 Spear Street #39C (3/3) - $3,200,000 [infinityviews.com]
Infinity Tower Two Sales Announcement (And A Buyer’s Translation) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (16) | (email story)

A Million Dollars Under Dotcom Days For The Brannan's Penthouse

As we wrote in February with respect to the penthouse atop the Brannan’s tower one:

Purchased as new for $3,980,000 as the dotcom days were in decline in December 2000, the Brannan’s tower one penthouse #18D resold for $2,810,000 in August 2005 at which point its HOA dues were $780 per month.
The HOA dues for 219 Brannan #18D are now $999 per month and the 2,005 square foot condo is back on the market and listed for $3,310,000. Call it 17 percent ($670,000) under 2000, but 18 percent ($500,000) over 2005 at asking for the penthouse.

The sale of 219 Brannan Street #18D closed escrow yesterday with a reported contract price of $2,942,500. Call it 26 percent ($1,037,500) under 2000, but 5 percent ($132,500) over 2005 for the South Beach penthouse in 2012.

From The Dotcom Days To Today As Viewed From A Penthouse [SocketSite]
San Francisco Employment Trends And Dot-Com Context [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

September 12, 2012

San Francisco Water Taxi/Shuttle Services Set For October Launch

Piers 1½ to 5

Five years ago, San Francisco Waterfront Partners built San Francisco’s first water taxi launch at Pier 1½ on the Embarcadero in conjunction with their $55 million rehabilitation of Piers 1½, 3 and 5; a launch for which no water taxi service existed.

From Port Executive Director Monique Moyer when the first launch was unveiled in 2007:

"We look forward to the day when our waterfront is connected by a series of convenient and enjoyable water transit stops, and the Port is working with its private-sector partners to bring this vision to fruition."

Yesterday, San Francisco's Port Commission voted to approve both water taxi and shuttle services in San Francisco, starting as early as October 1. Pier 1½ will serve as the landing for the Ferry Building Waterfront Area.

Piers 1½ to 5

Landing rights have also been granted at the Hyde Street Harbor and South Beach Marina with others in the works.

San Francisco Water Taxi Service Take Two [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

The New Mission: Don’t Fear The Multiplex (Or Change)

Under the framework of the plans for the New Mission Theater, we promote a plugged-in reader’s comment to an editorial on "The New Mission," not only in terms of the theater, but also the neighborhood's change:

This is terrific news. Nobody should worry and fear the word multiplex. I've lived in the Mission for 29 years, BUT I have had to live/work in Austin on and off for the past two years. I hate Austin, frankly, and miss the Mish, but the one bright point has been that Austin is a killer film town. Mostly due to the Alamo Drafthouse...
The Austin theaters really do cinema very well. The Alamo Drafthouse is a great place to watch films. Great bar, great food, you can relax and watch the film, eat, get waited on, and they take cinema seriously. They show great old classics, plus all the best independents.
This is a dream come true for that theater on Mission, and for Mission Street, which keeps getting better and better. Folks in our area have been dreaming to rescue that place for years. The Sundance Cinema tried to do something like this business model over at the Kabuki, but the results haven't been as great. They don't have good taste. The Alamo people have good taste.
There's another place in Austin btw that's even better, the Violet Crown. I hope the new Alamo Mission is at that level. It's a restaurant that's worth going to alone, regardless of the movie. Handcrafted cocktails, really great vibe. The New Mission will have to place at that level to do well.
I hardly recognize my Mission District from almost 30 years ago, but frankly, that is a good thing. I roll my eyes when people complain. The bad stuff used to be really really bad. Now, I just adore what it's turning into. But I should, because way back then, I bought my big ole house on a great block in 1991, so I can hardly be a hater. I can also hardly imagine how hard it is for a 22 year old to move here and try to get a foot hold. You can't. You gotta go elsewhere.
But for us early adopters, and for all the old families in the neighborhood, this is really going to be great. All they need is a good film programmer, and we're all going to be going to the New Mission.

We're already there.

New Mission Theater Plans Moving Forward, Targeting 2013 Opening [SocketSite]
New Life, Food, And Beer For The New Mission Theater As Proposed [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | (email story)

September 6, 2012

New Mission Theater Plans Moving Forward, Targeting 2013 Opening

New Mission Theater Block (www.SocketSite.com)

The proposed conversion of the New Mission Theater into a five-screen venue with food and "adult beverage service" which we first reported seven months ago continues to move forward. As we wrote about Alamo Drafthouse Cinema’s plans for the building in February:

Inside, the theater would be converted from one to five screens, "utilizing and dividing the existing balcony levels (one auditorium on the ground floor, three new auditoriums on the lower balcony, and one new auditorium on the upper balcony)" while the projection room on the first floor would become a bar (click image to enlarge).

On the outside, the plan "would maintain and restore the character-defining elements on the exterior, including the Art Deco façade; free-standing pylon sign with neon tubes spelling out “New Mission;” cantilevered marquee; and streamlined parapet."

With terms for Alamo Drafthouse Cinema to purchase and renovate the property pending City approvals in place, and now targeting an end of 2013 re-opening, the plans for the New Mission Theater and the housing project next door are currently scheduled for another hearing with San Francisco's Historic Preservation Commission in December.

New Life, Food, And Beer For The New Mission Theater As Proposed [SocketSite]
Giant Value Housing Or Headache To Come In The Mission? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

September 5, 2012

We'd Guess They Didn't See This One Coming Over At The St. Regis

188 Minna #33C

As we first reported in January:

Purchased for $2,700,000 in 2008; on the market for $2,550,000 in 2009; and listed for $2,100,000 last year, the 1,670 square foot St. Regis two-bedroom known as 188 Minna Street #33C has just returned to the market anew, now asking $1,995,000.

The sale of 188 Minna Street #33C closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $1,750,000. That’s still rather rich at $1,048 per square foot, but 35 percent ($950,000) less rich than the $1,617 per square for which the condo was purchased in February 2008.

As an eagle-eyed reader noted earlier this year, on the shelf in the closet sat a book titled "Seeing What's Next." While we don't know if the sellers bought the book before or after they bought the condo, we'd have to guess they didn't see this coming.

188 Minna #33C closet

Seeing Red At The St. Regis [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

September 4, 2012

Chinese Hospital's Plans Set For Approval As CPMC's Are Stalled

835 Jackson Proposed

As we reported in July, "while most eyes remain on the wrangling between CPMC and Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco’s Planning Commission is scheduled to certify the Chinese Hospital’s development and expansion plans, plans which require a zoning variance, conditional use authorization, and a General Plan amendment."

Having been approved by Planning, San Francisco's Board of Supervisors are scheduled to certify the Chinese Hospital’s development and expansion plans this afternoon.

While CPMC’s long-range development and expansion plans were also approved by Planning, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors have refused to affirm and stalled as the Mayor has since upped his previously agreed upon demands and CPMC sent their pre-construction teams packing.

Once again, as the existing building at 835 Jackson Street and area currently appear:

835 Jackson Existing

Inharmonious San Francisco Hospital Happenings (Beyond CPMC) [SocketSite]
Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA [SocketSite]
The Chinese Hospital's Plans, Will The Mayor Make Demands? [SocketSite]
Supervisors Affirm Commitment To St. Luke's, Delay On Cathedral Hill [SocketSite]
CPMC And The City Reach Agreement For Cathedral Hill Hospital Plan [SocketSite]
CPMC's Pre-Construction Teams Sent Packing [SocketSite]
Is Bruce Lee's Birthplace Historic Or Soon To Be History? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

August 31, 2012

Dolores Park NIMBY's Suddenly Abandon Their "Historic" Concerns

601 Dolores

Citing concerns that the Children's Day School's proposed changes to 601 Dolores would "substantially impact [the building’s] historical significance and its qualifications as a historical resource," the historic stewards at 629 Dolores filed a legal appeal to block the proposed renovations at 601 Dolores, including the addition of a roof deck, over which the neighbors' own newly added roof deck just so happens to peer.

With the Day School having since agreed to limit the use of their proposed roof deck to 20 hours a week between 9am and 5pm (not including 11am to 1pm during which use will only be allowed three days a week during the school year), and no more than six times a year between 6pm and 9pm, the neighbors have suddenly abandoned their historic concerns and are now perfectly fine with the potential impact on the building's historical significance and its qualifications as a historical resource which will likely be approved next week.

Castle On The Park (601 Dolores) In Contract For $6,600,000 [SocketSite]
Sweet Jesus (So To Speak): 601 Dolores On The Market And Inside [SocketSite]
Playing The Preservation Card To Block Building Atop 601 Dolores [SocketSite]
601 Dolores Street: Approval with Different and Modified Conditions [
Let There Be The Light (And Rooftop Garden) Of Day At 601 Dolores [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

August 30, 2012

A Remodeled Royal "Apple" Is Picked Atop Taylor Street

1750 Taylor #2003 Living Room

Speaking of buildings on Taylor Street, as we first noted five months ago, the 1,920 square foot Royal Towers unit #2003 at 1750 Taylor was purchased for $2,675,000 in 2002 and subsequently upgraded with a new kitchen, baths and bamboo floors.

Returned to the market and listed for $2,850,000 in March, the sale of 1750 Taylor Street #2003 closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $2,600,000, three (3) percent under the pre-renovated sale price it recorded in 2002.

On A Day Like Today, We'll See You At The Pool... [SocketSite]
Building Plans For The Point One Percent On Broadway And Taylor [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (25) | (email story)

August 27, 2012

Golden State Warriors Snag Snøhetta For Piers 30-32 Stadium Design

Oslo Opera House

While Facebook has tapped Frank Gehry, the Golden State Warriors have snagged Snøhetta, the architecture firm behind SFMOMA’s expansion and the waterfront Norwegian National Opera and Ballet building pictured above, to design the Warriors' proposed stadium upon Piers 30-32 and the development of Seawall (SWL) 330 across the street.

San Francisco Seawall 330

Snøhetta will be paired with AECOM's San Francisco office for stadium expertise.

Let It Snø! (Snøhetta Snags SFMOMA Expansion Project) [SocketSite]
Linking 2 worlds of culture: art, sports [SFGate]
SFMOMA Expansion Design: New Details, Renderings And Video [SocketSite]
Frank Gehry Engaged To Design Facebook's Menlo Park Expansion [SocketSite]
The Plans For A Legacy San Francisco Warriors Arena Upon The Piers [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (34) | (email story)

August 24, 2012

Inside The Urban Pad At 2495 Harrison And Behind The Plans For More

2495 Harrison Street 2012

As we first wrote about 2495 Harrison Street last year:

A saloon in 1888, vacant since 2008, and having served as a commercial space between, as proposed the single-story building at 2495 Harrison Street would be converted into a nonprofit community facility d.b.a. "The Seed Fund for the Studio for Urban Projects."
In addition to the renovation, as proposed a three-story single-family home of 1,400 square feet would be built on the back of 2495 Harrison Street's lot. San Francisco's Planning Department supports the project, the Planning Commission will vote this week.

While the conversion and expansion of the existing building for use as a community center was approved, as far as we know it never came to be and instead the building was remodeled as a lofty one-bedroom urban pad with parking for three cars.

2495 Harrison Interior 2012

Purchased for $550,000 in 2010 prior to the remodel, the property is now back on the market and listed for $828,000 including the plans, but no permits, for the new home to be built upon the aforementioned parking spaces out back.

2495 Harrison Street Rendering

∙ Listing: 2495 Harrison Street - $828,000 [paytonbinnings.com]
From Saloon To Nonprofit And Single-Family Home On Harrison [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

Moscone Center's Expansion Plans Going Underground

Having abandoned a onetime proposal to raze 680 Folsom to make way for Moscone Center's growth, and the re-skinning and renovation of 680 Folsom well underway, a plan to dig out a 500,000-square-foot addition under Howard Street has been selected as the way Moscone will expand.

From Renovation To Potentially Razed For 680/690 Folsom [SocketSite]
A Re-Skinning Crane Has Risen At 680 Folsom Street [SocketSite]
$550M Moscone project takes shape [San Francisco Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

August 22, 2012

The Local Scoop: Behind The Purchase Of 740 Church Street

740 Church Street

When 740 Church Street first hit the market in April listed for $5,250,000 including the undeveloped lot at 222 Cumberland, a number of plugged-in people estimated the lot to be worth $1 million.

Having sold for a combined $5,250,000 in August, the recorded value for the house at 740 Church Street was $4,275,000 while the lot at 222 Cumberland was recorded at $975,000.

As best we can tell, it wasn't Facebook, Zynga or other web 2.0 money behind the purchase which was financed with a $2 million mortgage and line of credit for up to $1.3 million more, but professional services to the tech industry are in play.

And no, the buyers aren't from overseas. In fact, the buyers are from two blocks away, having purchased 366 Liberty for $2,575,000 in 2009, the sale of which we featured at the time and a property we wouldn't be surprised to soon see returned to the market.

Inside The Rather Spectacular Spanish Colonial Home At 740 Church [SocketSite]
A Rather Spectacular Property Draws A Rather Spectacular Price [SocketSite]
We've Been Looking Past The Overhyped Facebook Effect, Have You? [SocketSite]
The Liberty Belle (366 Liberty) Is Rung Again And By The AIA [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

August 17, 2012

99,750 Reasons Your Agent Might Now Be Bullish On One Rincon Hill

If your agent has suddenly become bullish on One Rincon Hill unit #2904, a plugged-in tipster notes there might be more than one reason why:

One Rincon Hill #2904 Sales Office Email

According to an email sent to agents yesterday, the One Rincon Hill sales office is now offering a 5 percent commission to the "buyer’s agent" who sells the 1,947 square foot three-bedroom unit. Now priced at $1,995,000, to quote the email titled "Five Percent + This Home= One Huge Payday!": Sell this home and earn $99,750 in one deal!

The same sized unit one floor above, 425 1st Street #3004, resold for $1,700,000 in March 2011 having originally sold for $2,019,000 in September 2008, down 15.8 percent.

As plugged-in people know and knew, back in 2009 the One Rincon Hill sales office was offering 20 percent discounts on unsold units and a 4 percent commission to agents.

Non-Secret At One Rincon Hill: "Over 20% Off" And 4% Commissions [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (20) | (email story)

August 16, 2012

Redeveloping Sixth Street: Corner Of Sixth And Howard As Envisoned

200 6th Street Site

As far as we know, Mercy Housing has yet to secure the $19 million it will take to raze the four-story Hugo Hotel which has sat vacant since 1987 and build a new nine-story mixed-use building upon the site at 200 6th Street at the corner of Howard.

200-214 6th Street Rendered

That being said, the proposed mixed-use project which would yield 67 apartments for very low income households and 2,845 square feet of new commercial space on the ground floor continues to make its way through planning, and we now have the renderings.

200-214 6th Street Rendered

The proposed building includes eight studios, 24 one-bedroom units, 25 two-bedroom units, and 10 three-bedroom units with the three-bedroom apartments ranging in size from 1,020 to 1,105 square feet, the two-bedroom from 750 to 880 square feet, the one-bedroom from 535 to 635 square feet, and the studios from 410 to 500 square feet.

If approved and funded, the project would take an estimated 20 months to construct, including two months for demolition of the Hugo Hotel which was acquired by eminent domain and upon which Brian Goggin's "Defenestration" has been hanging since 1997.

Defenestration

UPDATE: Some food for thought with respect to what constitutes a "very low income household" at 30 to 50 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI), the demographic for this project as proposed. This year, an individual would have to make between $21,650 and $36,050 to qualify. A full-time employee at minimum wage would earn just over $21,000.

The median salary for a full-time public school teacher in San Francisco is $60,687 which is just over 80 percent of the Area Median Income, the threshold below which an individual is considered "low income" with respect to affordable housing develoments in San Francisco.

Hugo Hotel Hangs On As Redevelopment Agency Is Dropped [SocketSite]
Defending The Design For 200 6th Street And Adieu To Defenestration [SocketSite]
And Now Back To The Hugo Hotel (And Eminent Domain On Sixth) [SocketSite]
The Hugo Hotel Has A Date With A Different Kind Of Bench [SocketSite]
Hugo Hotel's Flying Furniture Update, No Word On The Graffiti [SocketSite]
Income Limits: 2012 HUD Unadjusted Area Median Income (AMI) [sf-moh.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (35) | (email story)

August 15, 2012

San Francisco's Market Street Masonry Discontiguous District

Market%20Street%20Masonry%20Discontiguous%20District.jpg

Composed of eight buildings between Franklin and Valencia Streets, the "Market Street Masonry Discontiguous District" doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. But if you’d like to roll around the district, there is a self-guided walking tour of the eight buildings which are being considering for Landmark designations.

For each building, the architects utilized a formal three-part arrangement consisting of a base (often with a commercial storefront), main portion or column (often with residential floors), and decorative top with either a projecting cornice or decorative parapet. Projecting bay windows visually reinforce the vertical emphasis, while increasing the light and air into the interior of many of the buildings.
All of the buildings are well-preserved examples and retain character-defining features, such as elaborate cornices, pattern brickwork, and unaltered historic storefronts with their glass transom lights, bronze plate glass window frames and decorative bases.

Each of the eight buildings were constructed between 1911 and 1925, commonly known as the Reconstruction Period, and "relate to each other as a group because of the period in which they were constructed, their high-style design, and fire-proof masonry construction."

1693 Market Street

The addresses and brief overview for the potentially landmarked eight:

1. 150 Franklin Street is located on a 120’ x 50’ through lot on the southeast corner of Franklin and Fell Streets. Built in 1912, 150 Franklin Street is a 5-story, concrete frame and brick apartment building, designed in the Classical Revival style.

2. 20 Franklin Street, AKA 1580-1598 Market Street is located on an irregular 97’ x 100’ lot at the northeast corner of Market and Franklin Streets. Built in 1917, 1580-1598 Market Street is a six-story, steel-frame, apartment and commercial building designed in the Classical Revival style.

3. 1649-1651 Market Street is located on a 124’x56’ lot at the southwest corner of Market and Brady Streets. Built in 1912, 1649-1651 Market Street is a five-story reinforced concrete frame apartment and commercial building designed in the Classical Revival style.

4. 1657 Market Street is located on a 25’x124’ lot on the south side of Market Street, between Brady and Gough Streets, with a rear elevation facing Stevenson Street. Built in 1911, 1657 Market Street is a five-story, reinforced concrete and timber-frame residential hotel with ground floor retail designed in the Venetian Revival style.

5. 1666-1668 Market Street is located on an irregular 27.5’x86’ through lot on the north side of Market Street, between Gough and Rose Streets. Built in 1913, 1666-1668 Market Street is a five-story, concrete-frame residential hotel with a commercial ground floor designed in the Colonial Revival style.

6. 1670-1680 Market Street is located on an irregular 55’x120’ through lot on the north side of Market Street, between Gough and Rose Streets. Built in 1923, the Gaffney Building is a six-story, reinforced concrete, steel frame, apartment and commercial building designed in the Renaissance Revival style.

7. 1687 Market Street is located on an irregular 45’ x 124’ through lot to Stevenson Street at the southwest corner of Market and Gough Streets. Built in 1925, the Edward McRoskey Mattress Factory Co. building is a two-story plus mezzanine, concrete frame, commercial building designed in the Classical Revival style.

8. 1693-1695 Market Street is located on an irregular 34’ x 124’ through lot to Stevenson Street, on the south side of Market Street between Gough and Valencia Streets. Constructed in 1914, 1693-1695 Market Street is a five-story, concrete-frame, residential hotel and commercial building designed in the Renaissance Revival style.

And with respect to the purpose and impact of landmarking the buildings:

The purpose of individual Landmark and local Landmark District designation is to recognize the historical and architectural significance of buildings, structures.
A second process, the National Register Certification of the local Landmark District, will qualify the buildings for additional Federal preservation incentives. These incentives include façade easements and Federal Tax Credits.
Lastly, the official commitment of a Landmark District designation ensures that historic properties are not negatively affected by future development in the neighborhood.

Market Street Masonry (Proposed) Landmark District [sfplanning.org]
Market Street Masonry Discontiguous District Self-Guided Walking Tour [sfplanning.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

August 14, 2012

1355 Market Square Scoop: Three New Restaurants And A Grocery

1355 Market Street Rendering: Coffee Shop

As we first reported in June with respect to Shorenstein’s makeover of the Western Furniture Exchange & Merchandise Mart at 1355 Market Street, the 11-story Mid-Market building they're rebranding along with 875 Stevenson Street as "Market Square," the buildings will include nearly 100,000 square feet of retail.

A plugged-in tipster now delivers the latest floor plan for the first floor of 1355 Market Street and notes three new restaurant spaces, a coffee shop and a potential 18,265 square foot grocery planned for the corner of Market and 10th (click floor plan to enlarge).

The Tweet Reincarnation Of 1355 Market Street [SocketSite]
Market Square's Mid-Market Retail Revolution [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

August 13, 2012

Historic Hibernia Bank Building: Then, Now And As Newly Proposed

Hibernia%20Bank%202012.jpg

Designed by Albert Pissis and constructed in 1892, the Hibernia Bank Building at 1 Jones and McAllister survived, for the most part, San Francisco’s great quake and fire of 1906.

Hibernia Bank circa 1906

The building’s interior was renovated and its dome was reconstructed after the quake, and in 1935 a penthouse "lounge area for the female employees" was added.

Hibernia Bank Building Rebuilt

Hibernia Bank vacated the building in 1985. From 1991 to 2000 the building served as the Central Station for the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD). And in 2008, the vacant building was purchased for $3.9 million. While the new owners still have no tenant nor particular use for the property in mind, they now have a plan to renovate:

Proposed exterior work includes two new stair penthouses, replacement of the existing elevator penthouse, enlargement of three existing window openings for new exit doors at north and west elevations, removal of portion of the existing wrought iron gate at west elevation, and rehabilitation of existing windows, steel roll-up security grilles, and granite.
At the interior, new shear walls and an elevator will be installed, a fire suppression system will be installed, portions of the existing teller counter will be removed and stored on site, and character-defining features and materials such as the extensive decorative marble, plaster, and stained glass will be protected in place and cleaned and repaired only as necessary.

Hibernia Bank Building Inside

As always, we'll keep you posted and plugged-in. Additional history, current interior shots and the full renovation plan thanks to Planning.

Hibernia Bank Buyer Unmasked (The Dolmen Property Group) [SocketSite]
Long Vacant Hibernia Bank Sold, To Be Renovated And Rented [SocketSite]
1 Jones Street (Hibernia Bank) Proposed Renovation Plan [sfplanning.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (20) | (email story)

Lofty Expectations For ClockTower #656

While recently painted and redecorated, the kitchen, baths and layout inside the 1,560 square ClockTower loft building #656 look to be relatively the same as when purchased for $1,085,000 ($695 per square foot) in January 2010.

With one loft bedroom over the kitchen, two full baths and two car parking, 461 2nd Street #656 has returned to the market in 2012 listed for $1,995,000 ($1,279 per square).

∙ Listing: 461 2nd Street #656 (1/2) 1,560 sqft - $1,995,000 [McGuire]
The ClockTower Lofts (461 2nd Street) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

August 10, 2012

Plans For Pier 19 To Become A Chinese Business Outpost

Pier 19

With China Development Bank (CDB) nearing a deal to provide the capital to kick-start the development of Hunters Point and Treasure Island, China's Vantone Holdings Co. is now in early talks with the City about plans to develop San Francisco's 206,000-square-foot Pier 19 "into space for Chinese companies seeking to do business in the United States."

Turning To China For Capital To Kick-Start Developments In SF [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

August 9, 2012

With Crushpad Crushed, A Climbing Gym Is Planned Along Third

Dogpatch%20Bouldering%20Site.jpg

With Crushpad having been crushed and its assets auctioned off earlier this week, the industrial space in which the company was founded in 2004 is in front of San Francisco’s Planning Commission this afternoon as Touchstone Climbing seeks approval to convert the 17,500 square foot space at 2501 3rd Street into a climbing gym without ropes.

‘Bouldering’ doesn’t require ropes, is more accessible to new climbers and is becoming the choice of the young crowd when it comes to rock climbing.
Dogpatch Boulders will be a unique facility, its walls very different than those at Mission Cliffs, but with the same business commitment to community and customer support. Our experience in the Mission tells us that the rock climbing clientele is largely local, over 50% of regular users living within a mile, and not more than 2% from any zip code more than two miles away.

As proposed, a glass storefront entry would be added along 3rd Street.

Dogpatch%20Bouldering%20Facade.jpg

Inside, bouldering walls, locker rooms and "lots of interior bike parking" would be built, click the floor plan to enlarge. We're letting that "choice of the young crowd" comment go.

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (5) | (email story)

August 1, 2012

Supervisors Affirm Commitment To St. Luke's, Delay On Cathedral Hill

CPMC Cathedral Hill Rendering

While San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors were unanimously able to affirm the City's Commitment (but not cash) to St. Luke's last week, yesterday the Supervisors voted unanimously (save Supervisor Kim who was absent) to once again delay their decision to either affirm or overturn Planning's approval of CPMC's long-range development plans which includes the aforementioned St. Luke's and a new Cathedral Hill Campus.

A mediator has been engaged to help find middle ground in the billion dollar game of chicken between the City and CPMC and the project's appeal is now scheduled to be heard by San Francisco's Board of Supervisors on November 20, 2012.

CPMC’s permit to demolish the Cathedral Hill Hotel which was nearly approved is now on hold pending the Board's vote.

Affirming The City’s Commitment, But Not Cash, For St. Luke’s [SocketSite]
Planning's Approval Of CPMC's Plans Being Appealed This Afternoon [SocketSite]
CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
The Billion Dollar Game Of Chicken Between The City And CPMC [SocketSite]
Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 5:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

July 24, 2012

Approved Fox Plaza Expansion Seeks Extension To Break Ground

Fox Plaza

Approved for development in 2009 with a three-year window in which to start building, the developers of the 120-foot-tall, 11-story building with up to 250 residential units over ground floor retail to rise adjacent to Fox Plaza are seeking a two-year extension to break ground "pending future improvements in the national and global economic outlook."

1390 Market Rendering

The new building on the corner at 1390 Market Street would yield 80 studios, 120 one-bedrooms and 50 two-bedrooms. And no new parking would be constructed. In fact, 18 existing Fox Plaza parking spaces would be removed.

1390 Market Rendering

With no plans to start construction anytime soon, the extension is expected to be granted.

1390 Market Rendering

Fox Plaza Expansion (1390 Market): Unanimously Approved As Well [SocketSite]
A Step Forward For The Plans To Expand Fox Plaza (1390 Market) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (28) | (email story)

July 23, 2012

Affirming The City’s Commitment, But Not Cash, For St. Luke’s

Last week CPMC requested and received a two-week postponement of the Board of Supervisors' vote to either affirm Planning’s approval of CPMC's long-range development plans, including a new Cathedral Hill Campus, or render them DOA.

On the agenda for San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors tomorrow, a proposed resolution "recognizing the importance of St. Luke’s Hospital and emergency room for the Southeastern Neighborhoods of San Francisco and affirming the Board of Supervisor’s commitment to working with Mayor Lee, the Department of Public Health, and private hospital corporations that currently operate in San Francisco to ensure the long term viability and operation of this critical institution."

Planning's Approval Of CPMC's Plans Being Appealed This Afternoon [SocketSite]
The Billion Dollar Game Of Chicken Between The City And CPMC [SocketSite]
CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
Affirming Commitment to Ensuring the Operation of St. Luke’s Hospital [sfbos.org]
Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (1) | (email story)

July 20, 2012

55 Laguna: The Revised Designs And Latest Development Scoop

Existing

As Laguna Street between Haight and Hermann in San Francisco currently appears above, as the streetscape will appear after the development of 55 Laguna as proposed below.

55 Laguna Streetscape As Proposed

In addition to rehabilitating the existing Richardson and Woods halls, the proposed project will include ten new buildings with courtyards, a community garden, a new pedestrian street ("The Mews" or "Palm Lane") and the new Waller Park at its core.

55 Laguna Revised Site Plan

The historic buildings on the site "were designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival style and have a quiet, inward-looking character" while the new buildings will have a contemporary design and "will be recognized as buildings of their own time."

55 Laguna Revised Rendering Elevation

The buildings are "neither quiet nor inward-looking," intended to bring vitality to the street.

55 Laguna Revised Rendering - Haight Street

The new buildings "will have a scale that is sensitive to the existing buildings, especially at adjacencies. Roof lines will be used to guide heights and setbacks. The massing of the new buildings will be broken down to reduce their apparent scale on the site."

55 Laguna Revised Elevation

The project includes an Amenity Building and circular outdoor stair, the "Mews Terminus," built in formed concrete and glass for some extra modern flair.

55%20Laguna%20Revised%20Rendering%20-%20Terminus.jpg

The project is designed and "organized in a way that allows the site to be accessible to both the future residents and the surrounding neighborhood."

55 Laguna Revised Rendering - The Mews

As proposed, the 55 Laguna development will yield a total of 413 new housing units including the 85-unit OpenHouse development for seniors targeting the LGBT community.

55 Laguna Back In Play [SocketSite]
55 Laguna: The Latest Rehabilitation Plans And Progress [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (52) | (email story)

July 18, 2012

Armistead Maupin's Storied San Francisco Home Hitting The Market

27 Belmont Avenue (www.SocketSite.com)

From Armistead Maupin's novel "The Night Listener":

Out of habit, I approached the house from the sidewalk across the street, where I could see it in context: three narrow stories notched into the wooded slope. Its new cedar shingles were still too pallid for its dark green trim, but another season or two of rain would turn them into tarnished silver. I’d been eagerly awaiting that. I’d wanted the place to look ancestral, as if we had lived there forever.

The house was 27 Belmont Avenue, which Maupin has owned since 1993, the year in which Maupin’s "Tales of the City" miniseries was first broadcast in America.

Tomorrow, the Parnassus Heights property at 27 Belmont will hit the market priced by Bernie Katzmann at $1,198,000 as Maupin and his husband are leaving his storied San Francisco behind and heading to Santa Fe.

And yes, the shingles have since tarnished.

UPDATE: 27 Belmont has officially hit the market, listed at 1,606 square feet and looking a lot less tarnished on the inside.

27 Belmont Avenue Living

∙ Listing: 27 Belmont (3/2) 1,606 sqft - $1,198,000 [talesofthecityhome.com]
Armistead Maupin [facebook.com]
Have You Heard The One About The House With Over 50 Offers? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (17) | (email story)

Seeking Twenty-Five Million, 2808 Broadway Sells for Seventeen

2808 Broadway

As we first reported last year:

As plugged-in people know, the Willis Polk designed home at 2808 Broadway has quietly been on the market with a $25,000,000 price tag. Last night, it was officially listed.
The four bedroom listing count for the Gold Coast property doesn’t include the two-bedroom apartment below for staff. Other numbers: six fireplaces, five levels with elevator access to the top four, two kitchens, and one sundeck with hot tub atop the home.
In terms of parking, well, there is none. Yes, it's time to slap a parking sticker on the Bentley. Just don't forget about street cleaning, those tickets can really add up.

The sale of 2808 Broadway closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $17,000,000, a savvy $8,000,000 (32 percent) less than list.

2808 Broadway Becomes Official Gold Coast Inventory At $25M [SocketSite]
Belli Would Be Fired Up As 2950 Broadway Is Reduced By $5,600,000 [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (23) | (email story)

July 17, 2012

Upward Ho Atop 100 California

100 California Rendering

The construction of a six-story vertical addition atop the 13-story office building at 100 California Street is another approved project that was waylaid by "weakness in the real estate market in recent years and the associated difficulties in securing financing."

100 California Addition Design

In addition to the vertical addition which would add 78,000 square feet of office space, the approved project for which the project sponsors are seeking another three year window in which to start construction would also add a ground-floor retail space with a planted roof and reconfigured pedestrian plaza at the base of the building.

100 California Design

San Francisco’s Planning Commission is expected to approve the extension this week with the project sponsors hoping to start pulling permits to build within a year.

Fresh Groceries In The Tenderloin Stymied By Poor Fiscal Conditions [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

July 16, 2012

One Rincon Hill: The Ground Has Been Broken For Tower Two

One Rincon Hill Two Towers Site Plan

The ground has been broken for tower two at One Rincon Hill to rise. As we first reported earlier this year with respect to the 299-unit Phase II:

For the floor plans and unit layouts, Phase II will combine the two adjacent small one bedroom units at the center of the building curve above floor 25 into one two bedroom unit. The number of two bedroom units will increase and the number of one bedroom units will correspondingly be reduced. Approximately 60% of Phase II unit plans are the same as Phase I.
Significant improvements in the Phase II building will include a 3,600 square foot exercise facility and a top floor 4,000 square foot penthouse "Sky Lounge." (As comparison, current Phase I amenities include a 750 square foot exercise room and an 1,100 square foot Party Room). All amenities, including the existing swimming pool and spa deck facilities, will be available to occupants of both towers.

While currently being positioned as rentals, the second tower will be condo mapped and we expect to see a sales, rather than rental, office for the building which should be construction complete by the middle of 2014.

One Rincon Hill's TwoTowers

The One Rincon Hill Tower Two Timing, Design And Details Scoop [SocketSite]
One Rincon Hill's Tower Two Targeting June 11 Construction Start [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

July 13, 2012

The Billion Dollar Game Of Chicken Between The City And CPMC

CPMC Cathedral Hill Rendering

With tensions running high and accusations flying, the appeal of Planning's approval for CPMC's long-range development plan is scheduled to be heard by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors this coming Tuesday, July 17, having been postponed from last month.

With a newly drawn battle line over the continued operation of St. Luke’s, and the Mayor seeking to amend the City's development agreement to which both sides had already agreed, is it really possible that the $2.5 billion project could fall apart faster than the Cathedral Hill Hotel for which paperwork has been filed to demolish?

Proposed CPMC Cathedral Hill Hospital Site (Image Source: MapJack.com)

In addition to development dollars, in this case, there are, quite literally, lives at stake.

Appeal of CPMC's Long Range Development Plan [sfbos.org]
CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA [SocketSite]
Planning's Approval Of CPMC's Plans Being Appealed This Afternoon [SocketSite]
CPMC And The City Reach Agreement For Cathedral Hill Hospital Plan [SocketSite]
Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

July 11, 2012

SF Cribs: Coming Up Short (In More Ways Than One)

Listed as a one-bedroom for $765,000 when The Hales Warehouse first hit the market in 2007, 410 Jessie #603 was purchased for $749,700 that July.

Having been unsuccessfully listed for $815,000 in 2009 and $799,000 in 2010, the 1,130 square foot condo is back on the market and listed as a short sale for $699,000 in 2012.

While newly listed as a "two bedroom," however, there appears to be a bit of childlike listing license in play with respect to this San Francisco crib.

Editor’s Note: The floor plan for #603 by way of a plugged-in reader:

410 Jessie #603 Floor Plan

∙ Listing: 410 Jessie #603 (2/1) 1,107 sqft - $699,000 [Redfin]
New Listings For New Developments On The MLS [SocketSite]
Mint Lofts: 410 + 418 Jessie Street, San Francisco [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (28) | (email story)

July 10, 2012

Inharmonious San Francisco Hospital Happenings (Beyond CPMC)

835 Jackson Proposed

While most eyes remain on the wrangling between CPMC and Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco’s Planning Commission is scheduled to certify the Chinese Hospital’s development and expansion plans, plans which require a zoning variance, conditional use authorization, and a General Plan amendment on Thursday.

According to San Francisco's General Plan, development's within the Chinatown Area Plan should "Promote a building form that harmonizes with the scale of existing buildings and width of Chinatown’s streets." As proposed, the following language will be added to Policy 1.2 of the plan: "other than construction within the Chinese Hospital Special Use District."

As the existing building at 835 Jackson Street and area scale currently appears:

835 Jackson Existing

Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA [SocketSite]
The Chinese Hospital's Plans, Will The Mayor Make Demands? [SocketSite]
Facilitating Development Of The Chinese Hospital Project [SocketSite]
Is Bruce Lee's Birthplace Historic Or Soon To Be History? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

Hotaling Isn’t For Horses Anymore: The Penthouse Atop The Stables

42 Hotaling Kitchen

Atop the landmark Barbary Coast building built as the Hotaling Stables in the 1860's, a 3,195 square foot penthouse with an urban rooftop terrace and garden was constructed.

42 Hotaling Roof

Purchased for $3,800,000 in November 2009, the three-bedroom penthouse pad at 42 Hotaling returned to the market eleven days ago listed for $3,500,000.

42 Hotaling Floor Plan

While already in contract, contingencies do remain.

∙ Listing: 42 Hotaling (3/2.5) 3,195 sqft - $3,500,000 [ninahatvany.com]
San Francisco Landmark #11: Hotaling Stables [noehill.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

While The Kitchen Is Still Red, Is 733 Front Street Back In The Black?

733 Front #601 Living

Purchased for $2,150,000 soon after the sales office at 733 Front Street opened in early 2007, the two-bedroom number 601 has returned to the market listed for $2,195,000.

733 Front Street #601 Kitchen

As plugged-in people know, one-bedrooms in the building were selling for as much as 38 percent off 2007 prices back in 2010. And while not listed on the MLS, tax records and its condo map record #601 at 1,509 square feet, not including the balcony.

733 Front Street #601 Floor Plan

And yes, we know that simply selling for more than its purchase price wouldn’t technically be "in the black" (and that #601 isn't representative of the entire building).

∙ Listing: 733 Front Street #601 (2/2.5) - $2,195,000 [baybridgeviewcondo.com]
733 Front Sales Update: 32% In Contract (Almost All Two-Bedrooms) [SocketSite]
Jackson Square For 34 38 Percent Less In 2011 [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

July 9, 2012

Mayor Lee To CPMC: Save St. Luke's Or Cathedral Hill Campus Is DOA

CPMC St. Luke’s Rendering

With the appeal of Planning's approval of CPMC's comprehensive development plans having been pushed to next week, and new fears that CPMC isn't committed to the long-term operation of its St. Luke’s campus in the Mission, Mayor Lee is reported to be seeking CPMC's agreement to keep St. Luke's in operation for at least 20 years, without which the Mayor will kill CPMC's plans for its Cathedral Hill campus in San Francisco.

UPDATE: In a press conference this morning, CEO Warren Browner intimated CPMC had no intentions of signing an amended development agreement, including a guarantee for the ongoing operation of St. Luke’s.

"We are committed to building (St. Luke's) here that we hope will stay open forever," Browner said, but "we stand for the development agreement as written." He acknowledged "circumstances" could alter that rosy view, insisting that CPMC’s success — and the reason it’s one of the survivors of what was once a much larger roster of hospitals in town — is that it takes its financial obligations "extraordinarily seriously."

Also intimated and noted by The Business Times, "the city’s failure to approve a development agreement hammered out over a decade and approved by the city’s Planning Commission in April, could result in St. Luke’s closure and the departure of its medical staff."

Planning's Approval Of CPMC's Plans Being Appealed [SocketSite]
Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall [SocketSite]
CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
CPMC says it won't renegotiate Cathedral Hill agreement [bizjournals.com]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

July 2, 2012

The 706 Mission Scoop: Design, Details And Timing For Museum Tower

706 Mission Rendering

As plugged-in people know, the proposed 550-foot tower to rise at 706 Mission Street would house the Mexican Museum on floors one to four with 43 floors of residential above.

706%20Mission%202012%20Design.gif

The base of the building would cantilever slightly over Jessie Square at the third and fourth floors and employ a glazed aluminum curtain wall system "articulated with vision, masonry, metal, and/or spandrel panel façade elements.”

706 Mission Rendering: Tower Base

Plans for the adjacent historic Aronson Building call for new retail and restaurant space on the ground floor with museum space on the second and third floors and either residential or office space on floors four though ten.

706 Mission Rendering 2012

With respect to parking, the existing Jessie Square Garage would be converted from publicly to privately-owned to provide parking for the project with 260 spaces for tower residents and 210 spaces on the upper two levels remaining available to the public.

Aronson Building with 706 Mission Rendered

Currently zoned for 400-feet, the project will require a zoning map amendment to see its full potential versus being cut short. Assuming an amendment, a determination that new shadows cast on Union Square are not adverse will be required as well.

The shadow calculations prepared for the proposed project indicate that it would cast net new shadow on Union Square during the morning hours from early October through early November and from early February through early March. The proposed project would not cast net new shadow on Union Square after 9:30 AM on any day during the year.
On an annual basis, the proposed project would cast 337,744 sfh of net new shadow on Union Square, which would be an increase of about 0.22 percent relative to the existing annual shadow on the park. This amount of net new shadow would exceed the remaining shadow budget of 323,123 sfh of shadow that could be cast on Union Square by proposed future development projects.

Assuming amendments and approvals this year, construction of the proposed project would take 36 months, cost an estimated $170 million, and ready for occupancy in late 2015 or 2016. As always, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

Sneak Peek: 706 Mission Tower Design And Aronson Building Rehab [SocketSite]
Sue Hestor Seeks To Stop Transit Center Tower Development Short [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (54) | (email story)

June 27, 2012

Having Merged Their Units, The Permanent Residents Are Moving On

301 Main Street #15C and #15D Floor Plans

In May of 2008, the 1,301 square foot Infinty Tower One two-bedroom #15D was purchased for $1,204,322. A year later, the owners of #15D purchased the 808 square foot #15C for $725,000. And in 2010, the owners requested permission to merge the two units into a single 2,117 square foot three-bedroom family condo at 301 Main Street.

301 Main Street #15C/D Floor Plan

The petitioners' argument for the merger:

We purchased unit 15D in May 2008 as a second home while living in Palo Alto. We quickly fell in love with the South Beach urban high-rise living. In September 2008 we decided to try and make the Infinity our primary home. We rented out our Palo Alto home and moved in full time to the two bedroom unit with our younger ten year old son.
After settling in at our new home and our son’s school we confirmed that this is where we want to stay and were looking for a larger home that can accommodate our family needs including an additional bedroom for our older son who was returning home from a year abroad.
For several months, roughly from December 2008 until May 2009, we looked for a three bedroom condo in the South Beach high-rise buildings in general and at the Infinity in particular. There were many small one and two bedroom units on the market but we were not able to find a large three bedroom unit that we could afford.
In May 2009 we had the opportunity to purchase the next door one bedroom unit (15C), in anticipation of combining the two units into our family home. We sold our Palo Alto home which helped us finance the purchase of the additional unit.
I would like to point to the following factors to hopefully help the Commission approve our application:
1. The combination of the units will enable us to live in the downtown / South Beach neighborhood in a family size unit. There are relatively few three bedroom units in the South Beach high‐rises. The Infinity has only 68 units (10% of the total) three bedroom units, all of which are either in the 5‐6 story buildings which do not provide the high‐rise living experience, or in the 28th to 42nd floors of the towers which tend to be more expensive and overwhelming in height. The three bedroom units in the Infinity range in size from approximately 1,300 SF to 1,800 square feet which is too small for our needs as a family of four. The combined two units on the 15th floor are just over 2,100 square feet.
2. The original approval of the Infinity project called for maximizing the number of family size units. Combining the two units will help achieve the city’s goal.
3. Having a family home in the South Beach neighborhood helps to strengthen and stabilize the neighborhood.
4. There are many available one and two bedroom units in the South Beach neighborhood and rental vacancy is high. We do not believe that the combination adversely impacts housing availability dynamics.

With numerous letters of support for the merger in able to allow the family to establish permanent residency in the building, the Planning Commission approved the merged.

Having since been combined, the now three-bedroom condo is back on the market and listed for $3,750,000.

∙ Dwelling Unit Merger Request: 301 Main Street #15C/D
∙ Listing: 301 Main Street #15C/D (3/2.5) 2,121 sqft - $3,750,000 [Redfin]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (86) | (email story)

Double-D's On Market Street 2.0: Dolby Making The Move

1275 Market Street

Currently headquartered at 100 Potrero Avenue, Dolby Laboratories is in contract to purchase the 385,000 square foot building at 1275 Market Street (across Ninth Street from Market Square) with plans to move their people once the building's renovation and seismic retrofitting are complete.

Also underway, shoring to prevent any sliding due to the construction of 17 stories on the adjacent lot at 55 9th Street which will impact the building's "13 decks and amazing views of downtown and the ballpark" a bit.

Dolby to follow Twitter, buys big Mid-Market building for HQ [Business Times]
The Tweet Reincarnation Of 1355 Market Street [SocketSite]
17 Stories And 273 Rental Units Ready To Rise At 55 9th Street [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

June 26, 2012

Praying For/From One Big Penthouse Atop 1601 Larkin As Proposed

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

Having failed to earn the Planning Commission’s approval last year which resulted in pending litigation, the razing and redevelopment of 1601 Larkin Street is back on the Planning Commission’s agenda this week with the Planning Department’s recommendation to approve the development, necessary variances, and the project's latest design.

1601 Larkin Rendering

The proposed project would demolish the dilapidated First St. John's United Methodist Church at the corner of Larkin and Clay and construct a 6-story building with 27 condos (24 of which will be two-bedrooms) over 29 parking spaces in its place.

1601 Larkin Aerial

The sixth floor will be one 4,860 square foot three-bedroom penthouse with five decks.

1601 Larkin #601 Floor Plan

As always, we'll keep you posted and plugged-in.

1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Three (Or Four) [SocketSite]
Development Of 1601 Larkin Disapproved By Planning Commission [SocketSite]
An Attempt To Settle For With San Francisco's Planning Commission? [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin: Comments, Responses And Latest Renderings [SocketSite]
Behind Closed Doors: 1601 Larkin Settlement Discussions This Week [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (13) | (email story)

June 25, 2012

A $225,000 America's Cup Settlement That's For The Birds

Tomorrow, San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors are scheduled authorize the payment of $225,000 to settle the lawsuit filed by "Waterfront Watch" over development activity related to the America’s Cup and on which former San Francisco Board of Supervisors president Aaron Peskin was a petitioner.

In addition to $150,000 for a bird study, the settlement includes $75,000 for attorneys' fees. And from point number four of the settlement agreement:

The Port shall retain that portion of Pier 29, considered by Petitioners to preserve the historic fabric of Pier 29 as set forth in the detail drawings attached to this Agreement as Exhibit 2. The Port shall retain the services of a qualified historic preservation architect to prepare the final architectural design for the east and south ends of Pier 29 as proposed for the long-term use of Pier 29 following the conclusion of the America’s Cup Event, which shall be provided to the Petitioners and Administrative Appellants and submitted to the City’s Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) to review and comment on its compatibility with the architectural and visual characteristics that define the Embarcadero National Register Historic District and consistency with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards.

Of course, satisfying point number four might now be a bit problematic and costly.

Pier%2029%206-25-12.jpg

As always, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

Piers 30-32 Dropped From AC34 Development Plan, Lawsuit Filed [SocketSite]
Waterfront Watch Settlement Ordinance [sfbos.org]
Pier Pressure And The Price San Francisco Taxpayers Might Pay [SocketSite]
Pier 29 On Fire: Teams Racing To Save The America's Cup Site [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

June 20, 2012

Pier 29 On Fire: Teams Racing To Save The America's Cup Site

Pier 29 In Flames

A tipster delivers a photo of the four alarm fire in progress at Pier 29, one of the key piers upon which the America’s Cup Village venue is being constructed.

AC34 Venue Rendering: Piers 27-29

Pier Pressure And The Price San Francisco Taxpayers Might Pay [SocketSite]
Amended America's Cup Host Agreement Approved [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (23) | (email story)

June 19, 2012

Playing The Preservation Card To Block Building Atop 601 Dolores

601 Dolores

An attempt to block the conversion of the 17,000 square foot Castle on the Park from private residence into a school and building of a roof deck and garden atop the building at 601 Dolores will be heard by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors this afternoon.

601 Dolores Day School Roof Garden

From the appeal of Planning’s decision to allow the project to move forward without an exhaustive, and prohibitively expensive, environmental review which was filed on behalf of the owners of the adjacent building at 629 Dolores:

The building at 601 Dolores Street has been designated as a "historically significant" building. Substantial evidence fails to demonstrate that the numerous changes proposed to the building individually or cumulatively will not cause a substantial adverse change by materially altering, in an adverse manner, the physical characteristics of the 601 Dolores building and substantially impact its historical significance and its qualifications as a historical resource. Moreover, the proposed changes do not follow the Secretary of Interior’s standards for the treatment of historic properties.
In addition, the City has failed to impose conditions of approval which would mitigate the potentially adverse significant impacts to historical resources down to a level of insignificance. There is evidence which includes, but is not limited to, the fact that the rooftop additions are visible from the street, as well as from other public locations in and around the Project, and the mechanical systems and planters which will be installed on the roof are inconsistent with the architectural style and appearance of the building.
These alterations will individually and cumulatively substantially degrade its historic character thereby substantially affecting its ability to be included in the City’s Historic Register.

And from an alumni newsletter a few years back:

In San Francisco, [an alumnus] reports: "A cozy and festive gathering on April 1 at [the appellant’s] beautiful new home! Together they renovated an entire building, and the wraparound city views from their top floor unit (including from a spectacular roof deck) are awesome."

At the time of Planning’s decision to allow the project to move forward, "the adjacent neighbor [at 629 Dolores] expressed concern about how activity on the proposed roof deck could impact noise and privacy at the rear of his multi-unit residential building next door and how the penthouse addition would block his [awesome] view."

We didn't, however, see any record of expressed concern with respect to preserving the buildings historic character at the time of Planning’s decision, those altruistic concerns appear to be newfound.

Let There Be The Light (And Rooftop Garden) Of Day At 601 Dolores [SocketSite]
Castle On The Park (601 Dolores) In Contract For $6,600,000 [SocketSite]
Sweet Jesus (So To Speak): 601 Dolores On The Market And Inside [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

A Masterful Millennium Tower Floor Plan And Apples-To-Apples Sale

301 Mission Street #17C Floor Plan

Purchased for $884,000 in March of 2010, 301 Mission Street #17C hit the market this past October listed for $849,000 before being withdrawn from the MLS in December.

Relisted for $849,000 this past February then reduced to $829,900 in April, the resale of the 833 square foot Millennium Tower one-bedroom #17C has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $825,000, off 7 percent from 2010 on an apples-to-apples basis.

Millennium Tower Apples-To-Apples Take Two [SocketSite]
The Millennium: A Few Things You Might Know (And A Few You Don’t) [SocketSite] 

Posted by socketadmin at 12:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

June 18, 2012

A New Church And 100 Condos At Gough And Eddy, God Willing

Free Farm at Gough and Eddy

Back in 1995, a fire destroyed the the St. Paulus Evangelical Lutheran Church that once stood at the corner of Gough and Eddy Streets where a garden now grows.

St. Paulus Church

Currently home to The Free Farm, Maracor Development, the builder of The Beacon buildings on King, is proposing to build 100 condominiums over a new 9,701 square foot church, community space and a 73-car parking garage on the site at 950 Gough.

As always, we’ll keep you plugged-in and ahead of the neighborhood development curve.

And yes, the designs for the new church and building are likely to be a little less ornate than the original above.

From The Flames Of St. Paulus The Free Farm Blooms [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

June 15, 2012

Bank-Owned Landmark San Francisco Mansion Sells For $11.5M

2799 Pacific

Nine years after completing a reported $10 million (plus) renovation, the San Francisco Landmark Ellinwood Mansion at 2799 Pacific was foreclosed upon in 2009 with $11,363,000 owed and no bidders at $10,000,000 in cash on the courthouse steps.

It wasn’t until 2011, however, that the bank forcibly removed the ex-owners and changed the locks on the Pacific Heights mansion with a rather luxurious spa out back.

Returned to the market two months ago asking $12,500,000, the sale of the 16,474 square foot property at 2799 Pacific closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $11,500,000. And yes, there were multiple bidders.

A tip of our hats to the historians and Ellinwood family members who plugged in to set the house's (and family) record straight.

A Landmark District Seven Mansion Foreclosure (2799 Pacific) [SocketSite]
Two Years Later And The Bank Gets Its Mansion Back [SocketSite]
A Foreclosed Upon San Francisco Landmark Mansion's Return [SocketSite]
2799 Pacific: The Behind The Scenes History And Plugged-In Scoop [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | (email story)

Perfectly Safer For Work (And Play) Modern Property Porn

355 Bryant #409 Living

As we wrote about 355 Bryant Street #409 back in June of 2007:

Yes, we have a soft spot for 355 Bryant. And no, it’s not going to be everyone’s cup of tea. But if you’re anything like us, the renovation of 355 Bryant #409 will leave you drooling (for one reason or another).
From the glass enclosed double rain shower stall, to the Boffi kitchen with built-in Miele (if we’re not mistaken) espresso machine, to the exposed timbers and private roof deck.

Having sold for $1,400,000 two weeks after we featured it, yesterday the ubermodern (and then rather voyeurlicious) loft returned to the market listed for $1,450,000.

Alas, the shower glass has been frosted, but we did spot some new mirrors.

355 Bryant #409 Bath

As the shower looked, and looked into, before:

355 Bryant #409: Bed/Bath

∙ Listing: 355 Bryant #409 (1/1.5) - $1,450,000 [Redfin]
An Ubermodern Renovation In A Classic Conversion Building [SocketSite]
The Live/Work Lofts Of 355 Bryant [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (6) | (email story)

Transbay Tower Timeline Moved Up, Payment To City Stays Down

Transbay Tower Rendering 2012

Having successfully renegotiated the amount they’ll pay The City for the land upon which to build San Francisco's Transbay Transit Tower and Terminal from $350 million to $185 million due to declining market conditions and a shorter tower, Hines might now start construction as early as next summer based on the strength of the market.

According to the Business Times, "[u]nder the best-case schedule, which is six months more aggressive than projections Hines made in March, Transbay Tower and the adjacent 5.4-acre City Park would be completed in late 2015."

Approved by San Francisco’s Planning Commission last month, San Francisco's Board of Supervisors will still need to approve the Transit Center District Plan for the building of the Transit Tower and Terminal at the center of the district to begin.

UPDATE: While Hines is pushing forward, Sue Hestor is pushing back.

Transbay Land Cost Cut Another $50 Million For Shrunken Tower [SocketSite]
Yes, The Proposed Transbay Transit Tower Shrank A Hundred Feet [SocketSite]
Hines leaps ahead on Transbay tower [bizjournals.com]
Planning’s Towering Transit Center District Plan Decision: Approved [SocketSite]
Sue Hestor Seeks To Stop Transit Center Tower Development Short [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (9) | (email story)

June 13, 2012

Bucking One San Francisco Trend But Jumping On Another

140 7th Street

As the issue of illegally renting residential units for transient use in San Francisco captures more press, the owners of the Best Western Carriage Inn at 140 7th Street are moving in the opposite direction and jumping on the mid-market movement, quietly proposing to convert their property from a 48-room hotel into a 27-unit residential building with 3 two-bedrooms, 24 one-bedrooms, and 32 parking spaces.

From the Planning Department with respect to the proposed parking:

The proposed project would construct twenty-seven (27) new residential units; therefore, 14 off-street parking spaces would be permitted as of right for the residential units. With Conditional Use Authorization, the project would be permitted to construct twenty (20) off-street parking spaces for the residential units. The project would not be permitted to construct thirty-two (32) parking spaces for the residential units. Therefore, the proposed project needs to be revised to meet this Planning Code requirement.
However, the proposed project may be permitted to retain the proposed number of off-street parking spaces, if the parking is converted into a public parking garage. The proposed project may seek Conditional Use Authorization from the Planning Commission to authorize the use of a public parking garage on the ground and second floors. Generally, the Department does not support excess parking in a transit-oriented area.

The 28 proposed bicycle parking spaces would, however, be permitted and 25 required.

Airbnb Hit List Take Two (Months Later) [SocketSite]
Market Square's Mid-Market Retail Revolution [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

June 12, 2012

The Development Drama Behind The Stagehouse Lofts. And...Action!

246 Dore Site

While the proposed development of a two-story automobile repair garage at 246 Dore Street wouldn’t affect the views of the foreclosed upon Stagehouse Lofts developer's unit which sold for $897,500 earlier this year, it will affect the views of Stagehouse Lofts #301, the owner of which has requested a Discretionary Review and redesign of the project.

246 Dore Street Site Aerial

From the objector:

The Stagehouse has 18 units that are occupied. Four of the units are on the second floor and open on to the deck. The deck provides the only open space and outdoor recreation area available to these four units. The deck is a significant quality of life amenity and a play area for small children that live in the building from time to time. Another four units on the third floor enjoy the view and the spaciousness of deck. The view to the northeast also provides most of the daylight available to the four second floor units that will be impacted by the project most directly.
The project as applied for will create a massive wall that will block the view and a significant portion of the light available to the four second floor units. Presently, the deck is enclosed by a parapet that is about three feet high as measured from the floor of the deck…The Appellant believes that the wall of the project will extend approximately another seven feet above the top of the parapet. The effect will be to "box in" the deck and cast a dark shadow over what is now an airy and bright open space. It will create a claustrophobic non-space.
Appellant estimates that each of the four second floor units will each suffer a decrease in fair market value from between $100,000 to $150,000 as the result of the loss or impairment of the present view, the diminution of available daylight, the diminution of use value of the deck, the general degradation of the aesthetic properties of the building and the decrease of the desirability of the building as an office and work area.

The development of 246 Dore Street was previously approved having been unopposed in 2007, but the permit to build expired. The Planning Department recommends the Planning Commission once again approve the project as proposed.

Behind The Scenes At Stagehouse Lofts (465 10th Street) [SocketSite]
And…Scene! As The Developer's Unit At Stagehouse Lofts Sells [SocketSite]
246 Dore Street Discretionary Review Packet [sfplanning.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

Planning's Approval Of CPMC's Plans Being Appealed This Afternoon

Proposed CPMC Cathedral Hill Hospital Site (Image Source: MapJack.com)

With the wrecking crew for the Cathedral Hill Hotel waiting in the wings, the appeal of the Planning Commission’s approval for California Pacific Medical Center’s Long Range Development Plan will be heard by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors this afternoon.

CPMC Cathedral Hill Rendering

The appeal was filed on behalf of the California Nurses Association/National Nurses United, Council of Community Housing Organizations, Cathedral Hill Neighbors Association, Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center, Jobs with Justice San Francisco, and San Franciscans for Healthcare, Housing, Jobs and Justice.

UPDATE: The hearing of the appeal has been moved to July 17, 2012.

Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall [SocketSite]
CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
California Pacific Medical Center Long Range Development Plan EIR Appeal [sfbos.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

June 11, 2012

Palm(s) Reading: The Rent Versus Buy Line And Rate Of Return

As we originally reported in April:

Purchased for $760,000 in late 2006, the two-bedroom number 606 at 555 4th Street (The Palms) is currently rented for $3,200 a month, a rent which will increase to $3,500 on Tuesday according to the owner.
On the market listed for $699,000, monthly HOA dues are $544 and the property tax rate is currently 1.17%. We’ll let you run the numbers in terms of rent versus buy or as an investment (for which we calculate a CAP Rate under 4 percent).

The sale of 555 4th Street #606 has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $724,000, over asking but 4.7 percent under late 2006 when it wasn’t occupied and with a cap rate of under 4 percent at the higher rent.

To Rent, Buy, Or Invest At The Palms By The Numbers (Not The Heart) [SocketSite]
San Francisco Property Tax Rate Set To Increase 0.67 Percent [SocketSite]
To Rent Or To Buy, That Is The Question (That Only You Can Answer) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (18) | (email story)

June 8, 2012

Mid-Market's Newest Secret Garden

1355 Market Street Rooftop Garden

Speaking of the reincarnation of 1355 Market Street, a plugged-in tipster captures the rooftop garden which has been rising atop the building.

In the words of our tipster who lives across the street in Fox Plaza, "I can tell you that the wind can be fierce, so I don't know how anyone will be able to enjoy the rooftop garden."

With the remake of Stevenson Alley in the works, perhaps an artistic turbine garden atop the building would have been a better call. And watch out for flying furniture.

The Tweet Reincarnation Of 1355 Market Street [SocketSite]
Fox Plaza Facelift In Progress [SocketSite]
Market Square's Mid-Market Retail Revolution [SocketSite]
Is The Wind Of Change Blowing Through San Francisco? [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

June 7, 2012

Market Square's Mid-Market Retail Revolution

Market Square Stacks

As we noted yesterday, the reincarnation of 1355 Market Street and the adjoining 875 Stevenson Street, together "Market Square," will include almost 100,000 square feet of potential new retail space in the buildings and a pedestrian plaza between the two.

Market Square Plaza

Comments: The Tweet Reincarnation Of 1355 Market Street [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:30 AM | Permalink | (email story)

The Price To Live On San Francisco's Postcard Row

The sale of 710 Steiner along San Francisco's famed Postcard Row closed escrow yesterday with a reported contract price of $2,400,000 ($960 per listed square foot).

As we first reported last month, the sellers of 710 Steiner purchased the house for $575,000 in 1993 and its screen credits not only include the Full House opening credits but also a role in The Dead Pool.

A Painted Lady On San Francisco's Postcard Row Seeks A Suitor [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

June 6, 2012

The Tweet Reincarnation Of 1355 Market Street

With Twitter having signed on as the anchor tenant, Shorenstein is moving forward with their makeover of the Western Furniture Exchange & Merchandise Mart at 1355 Market Street, the 11-story Mid-Market building they're rebranding as "Market Square."

1355 Market Street Rendering

Proposed exterior renovations to be presented to San Francisco’s Architectural Review Committee this afternoon include: New metal-and-glass, ground floor storefronts with integrated externally illuminated signage and removal of the existing granite base; new transom windows above ground floor storefronts; and a new two-story lobby entrance on Market Street where the existing entry to the defunct garage along Market is located.

1355 Market Street Lobby Rendering

Behind the building, the portion of Stevenson Street between 1355 Market and 875 Stevenson will become a pedestrian area with new openings from the building to increase its connection with the outdoor space, promote the retail to be located within the buildings, and in an attempt to vitalize Stevenson.

1355 Market Street Alley Rendering

Click the rendering atop the page to enlarge, as the building now appears to compare:

1355 Market Street 2012

Twitter Intent On Moving To Market Square Assuming Tax Break [SocketSite]
More Mid-Market Development And Definition [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (32) | (email story)

June 5, 2012

1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Three (Or Four)

1601 Larkin Rendering

For those who might have missed the updated renderings for 1601 Larkin Street we first published last week, a plugged-in tipster delivers the latest latest renderings now complete with shadows, a little more texture, and one less rendered car.

1601 Larkinm Rendering: Clay Street Elevation

We're keeping all comments on our original report.

1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Two (Or Three) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 4:00 PM | Permalink | (email story)

June 1, 2012

1601 Larkin Street Design Sneak Peek Take Two (Or Three)

First St. John's United Methodist Church at Larkin and Clay (Image Source: MapJack.com)

As we first reported in January, while San Francisco’s Planning Commission blocked the proposed demolition of the dilapidated church at 1601 Larking Street and development of a modern Stanley Saitowitz designed building in its place, Ian Birchall was quietly engaged to redesign the project as "a contemporary interpretation of a European city apartment building" in an attempt to appease the Commission and neighbors.

With San Francisco’s Planning Commission continuing to meet behind closed doors to discuss litigation and consider settlement proposals with respect to the development of 1601 Larkin Street, next week the project sponsors will informally present the revised revised design and state of the existing church (it's bad) to the Commission.

1601 Larkin Rendering Revised

The current iteration of the project proposes the same program as the previous project, involving the demolition of the existing church and the construction of a six-story building containing 27 dwelling units and 29 off-street parking spaces. However, the design of the project has been substantially revised in terms of massing, architectural language, and finish materials.
Specifically, the current design incorporates setbacks above the fourth story along the Clay Street elevation such that the building appears to step with the sloping topography of the block, creating a more suitable transition to the adjacent lower buildings to the west. The sixth level incorporates various setbacks from the roofline, lessening the apparent height of the project by making the uppermost story visually subservient to the remainder of the building. Deep voids have been added at the center of both the Clay and Larkin Street elevations to break the massing of the project into a rhythm of discrete, vertically-oriented modules.
Compared to the previous project, the current design proposes a much higher proportion of solid wall planes versus glazing, and would be finished in a light-colored limestone plaster material.

1601 Larkin Rendering Revised: Larkin Street Elevation

As always, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in to what’s happening behind the scenes. And once again, the Saitowitz design which was rejected:

1601 Larkin Rendering as Proposed

An Attempt To Settle For With San Francisco's Planning Commission? [SocketSite]
Development Of 1601 Larkin Disapproved By Planning Commission [SocketSite]
1601 Larkin: Comments, Responses And Latest Renderings [SocketSite]
Behind Closed Doors: 1601 Larkin Settlement Discussions This Week [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (19) | (email story)

May 22, 2012

A Record $2,784 Per Square Foot In SF And Bank (Executive) Owned

1170 Sacramento #19B View

As a plugged-in reader wrote when we first reported that 1170 Sacramento #19B was in contract having been listed for $6 million or $3,000 per square foot:

No doubt the new owner is the same First Republic Bank exec that swooped up PH A and C. Both within the last year. Now he can build out a full floor penthouse mecca. Who else would have paid the over-the-top asking price? Only someone that had to have it.

As another plugged-in tipster notes, the deed has been recorded and the sale has very quietly closed escrow at $5,565,500. While not over $3,000 per square foot, call it $2,784 which is still a new record in San Francisco, we do believe.

And the buyer? Yes, that would be the aforementioned First Republic Bank Chairman and CEO that had to have it and now owns the entire floor.

Scoop: A Record $3,000 Per Square Foot In San Francisco Within Sight [SocketSite]
Shooting For A Record $3,000 Per Square In San Francisco [SocketSite]
The Shell Of The Northern Penthouse Atop 1170 Sacramento Sells [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

May 21, 2012

One Rincon Hill's Tower Two Targeting June 11 Construction Start

One Rincon Hill's TwoTowers

As we first reported with respect to One Rincon Hill’s Phase and Tower 2 in March:

Construction is anticipated to start approximately June 1, 2012 and be completed in an estimated 26 months. The building design, unit size and unit mix can be summarized as a 50 story [or 450 foot] version of Phase I...
For the floor plans and unit layouts, Phase II will combine the two adjacent small one bedroom units at the center of the building curve above floor 25 into one two bedroom unit. The number of two bedroom units will increase and the number of one bedroom units will correspondingly be reduced. Approximately 60% of Phase II unit plans are the same as Phase I.
Significant improvements in the Phase II building will include a 3,600 square foot exercise facility and a top floor 4,000 square foot penthouse "Sky Lounge." (As comparison, current Phase I amenities include a 750 square foot exercise room and an 1,100 square foot Party Room). All amenities, including the existing swimming pool and spa deck facilities, will be available to occupants of both towers.

Having first been approved for development in 2005 before falling on hard times, on Thursday San Francisco’s Planning Commission is expected to extend the development’s expired entitlement and clear the way for a groundbreaking next month (June 2012).

One%20Rincon%20Hill%20Two%20Towers%20Site%20Plan.jpg

One Rincon Hill’s Second Tower will yield 299 units all of which will be market rate with a $15,090,879 fee paid to the city in-lieu of including any Below Market Rate (BMR) units.

In addition to the BMR fee, the city will collect a $4,035,150 Rincon Hill Infrastructure Impact Fee, a $5,140,726 SOMA Stabilization Fund Fee, and a School Fee of $988,431.

The target date for pulling the Site Permit and to begin shoring is now June 11, 2012.

The One Rincon Hill Tower Two Timing, Design And Details Scoop [SocketSite]
One Rincon Hill Tower Two Site In Play [SocketSite]
Where The Development Fee Dollars Are (And Are Going To Be Spent)

Posted by socketadmin at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (17) | (email story)

Big Views, Floor Plan And Price Atop Russian Hill

945 Green Street #11 View

Sporting big San Francisco views, floor plan, and price ($7,700,000), the full floor unit #11 at 945 Green Street hasn’t been listed but is on the market atop Russian Hill.

945 Green Street #11 Floor Plan

The full floor unit two floors below (#9) sold for $6,700,000 in 2008 having been renovated in a more modern aesthetic and measuring 4,800 square feet per tax records.

∙ Listing: 945 Green Street #11 (4/4.5) - $7,700,000 [sfproperties.com]
945 Green #9: Eye Candy Abounds (Art, Design, Plan And Views) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (7) | (email story)

May 17, 2012

From The Dotcom Days To Today As Viewed From A Penthouse

219 Brannan #18D Floor Plan

Purchased as new for $3,980,000 as the dotcom days were in decline in December 2000, the Brannan’s tower one penthouse #18D resold for $2,810,000 in August 2005 at which point its HOA dues were $780 per month.

The HOA dues for 219 Brannan #18D are now $999 per month and the 2,005 square foot condo is back on the market and listed for $3,310,000. Call it 17 percent ($670,000) under 2000, but 18 percent ($500,000) over 2005 at asking for the penthouse.

∙ Listing: 219 Brannan #18D (3/3) 2,005 sqft - $3,310,000 [Redfin]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (26) | (email story)

May 16, 2012

North Beach Pagoda Theater Set To Be Sold To New Yorkers Today?

North Beach Pagoda Theater (Image Source: MapJack.com)

According to a tipster, Joel Campos who purchased the long shuttered North Beach Pagoda Theater in 2004 and waged a long battle to secure approvals to develop the blighted building is in contract to sell the shell to a New York based developer today.

While we haven’t been able to confirm the details, we’ll keep you posted and plugged-in.

And once again, as the approved conversion of the Pagoda Theater into 18 condos over ground floor commercial and 27 parking spaces was last rendered:

Pagoda Theater Rendering 2010

North Beach Pagoda Theater Plans Approved By Planning, But... [SocketSite]
Inside The “Landmark” Pagoda Theater (And Tussle) In North Beach [SocketSite]
Pagoda Theater Preview (And Signs Of Progress All Around) [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (28) | (email story)

555 Mission In Contract At $800 Per Foot, Highest Price Since 2007

555 Mission at Night

Having leased the 14,718 square foot penthouse atop 555 Mission Street for seven years at a rate of $84 per square foot in 2008, in 2009 Sequoia Capital subleased the penthouse to Novak Druce Quigg for the remainder of their lease at a 40 percent discount ($50 per square foot) without escalation.

As plugged-in people know, Sequoia had "intended to use this space for creating a new public securities investment fund, not for making SF-based VC investments."

With 555 Mission now 88 percent occupied, Union Investment is in contract to buy the building for $445 million, or $800 a square foot, "the highest price paid for a downtown San Francisco building since Morgan Stanley Real Estate bought One Market Plaza for $925 a square foot...in 2007."

555 Mission: Sequoia’s Penthouse Sublease At 40 Percent Off [SocketSite]
Tishman to sell 555 Mission for $445M [Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (3) | (email story)

May 15, 2012

Bay Area NIMBY’s Take Note (Golden Gate Bridge Edition)

As John King and a reader note: "Critics depicted the [Golden Gate Bridge] as financially unsound, legally dubious, an aesthetic blight and an engineering hazard in the decade before the start of construction in 1933."

Golden Gate Bridge construction - and indignation [SFGate]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (21) | (email story)

May 14, 2012

55 Laguna: The Latest Rehabilitation Plans And Progress

55 Laguna Campus Aerial

Having purchased the former UC Berekely Extension campus at 55 Laguna last year, the new owners have filed an application to rehabilitate Richardson and Woods halls.

The proposal is to rehabilitate Richardson Hall for use as senior services, senior housing (40 dwelling units), and retail and/or office space in new excavated space created behind the Hermann/Laguna Street retaining wall; to rehabilitate Woods Hall for use as housing (21 dwelling units); and, to rehabilitate Woods Hall Annex for use as a community center.

55 Laguna: Richardson Hall Rendering 2012

At the exterior, the work at all three buildings will generally include creating several new wall openings, selective window replacement and/or modification, seismic upgrades, maintenance and repair work, and in‐kind roof repair and/or replacement.

The redevelopment and building of 413 housing units on the six acre Hayes Valley campus was first approved by Planning in 2008 and subsequently entitled.

55 Laguna Site Plan 2012

With respect to the latest designs for the buildings and open space to be built in the middle of the campus, which includes 109 apartments sponsored by Openhouse for low-income LGBT seniors, we’ll keep you plugged-in.

55 Laguna Back In Play [SocketSite]
55 Laguna: Approved On Appeal And In Front Of San Francisco’s BOS [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

May 10, 2012

Forget 50 Offers, How About Under Asking But 50 Percent Over 2010?

Infinity Tower 2 (www.SocketSite.com)

While the penultimate penthouse a floor below was listed for $2,000,000 in early 2010, the Infinity Tower Two unit #42D which wasn't listed sold for $1,500,000 that February. Three months later, 338 Spear Street #41D sold for $1,425,000.

This past March, 338 Spear Street #42D was listed for sale, it closed escrow two weeks later. While the recorded sale price was $250,000 under asking, at $2,250,000, it was also $750,000 (50 percent) over its 2010 sale price on an apples-to-apples basis.

Happenings High Atop The Infinity’s Tower Two [SocketSite]
Infinity Sales Update And A Few Additional Details For Tower Two [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

Yelp Inks An Eight Year Lease For One-Third Of 140 New Montgomery

140 New Montgomery: Aerial

Yelp has inked an eight year lease for 100,000 square feet of the 295,000 square foot Pacific Telephone Building at 140 New Montgomery which is currently undergoing a major renovation and repositioning (click image to enlarge, link for details).

Yelp is expected to make its move from 650 Mission in the fall of 2013.

140 New Montgomery: The More Things Change... [SocketSite]
140 New Montgomery: Renovation And Rendering Scoop [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

May 9, 2012

Up 15 Percent Year-Over-Year For A Polished South Beach Apple

200 Brannan

As we reported with respect to a polished South Beach apple back in February:

Listed for $1,288,000 in January 2011, the 2,097 square foot #320 at 200 Brannan sold for $1,260,000 last April. Back on the market ten months later and listed for $1,450,000.
With new hardwood floors in place, it’s not perfectly apples-to-apples, but we’ll call it close enough. And if you think you know South Beach, now’s the time to tell.

In the words of a plugged-in LegacyDude on the record at the time:

I think I know South Beach. And I know this building, although I've not seen this particular unit. If it's the floor plan I'm thinking of, it's really more suitable for a couple, as the layout would not work well for roommates despite being a 2/2. So not a great rental.
That said, dumb tech money is back in Soma, so I don't think the ask is outside the realm of possibility. I don't follow 200 Brannan that closely, but looks like recent sales have averaged ~$700 psf. Assuming this unit has no critical flaws that are hidden in the pictures, and the square footage is accurate, it could go for/close to asking. I'll guess $1.35 to hedge myself.

No need to hedge, Dude, the sale of 200 Brannan Street #320 closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $1,450,000, up 15 percent ($190,000) year-over-year.

South Beach Apples-To-Apples And Year-Over-Year [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 2:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (4) | (email story)

May 8, 2012

What The F-Line

The discussion surrounding the design competition for concepts to "enliven and integrate" Fort Mason appropriately turns to the proposed extension of Muni's F-line from Fisherman’s Wharf to the Fort (click the image to enlarge).

The extension would cover less than a mile along City streets and through an existing rail tunnel adjacent to Fort Mason Center. The new terminus of the extension would be in the Fort Mason Center parking lot adjacent to Building A. The National Park Service has completed the environmental impact Statement (EIS) for the extension.

It would cost an estimated $40 million to design and construct the extension.

Creative and Practical Concepts To Enliven and Integrate Fort Mason [SocketSite]
Extension of F-Line Streetcar Service to Fort Mason Center [nps.gov]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

May 7, 2012

Creative and Practical Concepts To Enliven and Integrate Fort Mason

Fort Mason

While there’s currently no budget to implement, invitations have been sent to a select group of firms to participate in a design competition for "creative and practical" concepts to "enliven and integrate" the 13-acre waterfront campus that is San Francisco’s Fort Mason.

While Fort Mason Center has been successful in offering programming and events that are diverse and engaging, the campus lacks a clear identity and cohesion that often prevents visitors from understanding the variety of uses on the site.
In addition, the campus includes spaces and amenities that have not been fully utilized to further Fort Mason Center’s mission, notably the vacant Pier One and the campus’s public realm, with a 437-space parking lot and an advantageous location on the bay.

Designed by the military with gates and retaining walls to separate the Fort from the city, ideas for improving its connection is a key element on which concepts will be judged.

A public presentation of the finalists' concepts is tentatively scheduled for October 15.

Fort Mason Center 2012 Design Competition Brief [fortmason.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

May 4, 2012

In The Land of Rising Sea Green Rents

1550 Bryant

Built in 1915 for the Rainier Brewing Company, the "Hamm’s Building" at 1550 Bryant operated as a brewery from 1915 to 1975. Vacant from 1975 to 1985, the 182,669 square foot building has since been converted to office space, just sold, and is about to undergo an "interior renovation program to further reposition the building’s creative space."

1550 Bryant Interior

UPDATE: When the brewery was shuttered in 1975, the iconic Hamm’s sign atop the building was removed. And while the buyers of the building have expressed interest in returning the sign to its place of prominence, its whereabouts are unknown. Readers?

San Francisco Hamm's Sign

What happened to the Hamm’s Brewery sign? [SFGate]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (24) | (email story)

A Painted Lady On San Francisco's Postcard Row Seeks A Suitor

One of the six famously photographed painted ladies on San Francisco’s Postcard Row, 710 Steiner last changed hands in 1993 when it sold for $575,000. The 2,500 square foot Victorian is now back on the market and seeking a suitor at $2,295,000.

From the Full House opening credits to The Dead Pool, this lady gets around.

UPDATE: Speaking of painted ladies, a plugged-in reader adds: "The owner's mother (woman in red dress in painting over the couch) was the first woman elected to the Connecticut State Legislature and a personal friend of George Gershwin."

∙ Listing: 710 Steiner (5/2) 2,500 sqft - $2,295,000 [Redfin]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (31) | (email story)

May 3, 2012

The Jewish Home Of San Francisco’s Plans To Expand

Jewish Home of San Francisco's current Campus

The Jewish Home of San Francisco sits at the corner Silver and Mission in the Excelsior with a campus that provides 430 beds and facilites for seniors. On the boards as rendered below, a plan to update and expand to 526 beds with a goal of breaking ground by 2014.

Jewish Home Expansion Plan

Jewish Home of San Francisco: Vision for the Future [jhsf.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (14) | (email story)

May 1, 2012

The Heights Takes Another Hit

1940 Broadway #6 Living

Having traded for $4,911,000 in March of 2008, the full floor Pacific Heights co-op Unit #6 at 1940 Broadway ("The Heights") resold for $4,200,000 in March of last year.

1940 Broadway

Listed for $4,350,000 this past September, the sale of 1940 Broadway #6 closed escrow today with a reported contract price of $4,000,000, down 5 percent ($200,000) on a year-over-year basis, down 19 percent ($911,000) versus March of 2008.

And while we still can’t confirm, if a plugged-in reader is correct, the unit quietly traded for $4,100,000 in February of 2010 as well (and it hasn't been occupied since 2008).

A Heights Of The Heights Apple Returns (1940 Broadway #6) [SocketSite]
A Quick Sale At (And From) The Heights [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 1:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (15) | (email story)

155 Fifth Street Rendered And Reopening (Wide) In 2014

155%205th%20Rendering%202012.jpg

As we reported last year, The University of the Pacific purchased the seven-story building at 155 Fifth Street with plans to reface and renovate the building with the first five floors to become the University’s School of Dentistry while the top two floors will be leased.

155 5th Street: Existing

The SmithGroupJJR has been tapped to lead the redesign of the existing building which is expected to reopen (wide) by the middle of 2014.

155 Fifth Street Refacing, Renovation And Repurposing In The Works [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

April 30, 2012

Is Bruce Lee's Birthplace Historic Or Soon To Be History?

835 Jackson

As plugged-in people know, the Chinese Hospital plans to raze their 29,793 square foot building at 835 Jackson and build a 101,545 square foot hospital in its place, a plan which will be presented to San Francisco’s Historic Preservation Commission this week.

835 Jackson Proposed

Yes, Bruce Lee was born in the building. And no, still no word from the Mayor’s office with respect to any demands for approving the needed project.

The Chinese Hospital's Plans, Will The Mayor Make Demands? [SocketSite]
CPMC And The City Reach Agreement For Cathedral Hill Hospital Plan [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (68) | (email story)

Apples-To-Apples And Two Years Later At The Artani

818 Van Ness: 8/11/08 (www.SocketSite.com)

As we wrote last month:

While the Artani sales office still has around ten unsold units left to sell over at 818 Van Ness Avenue, #203 has returned to the market as a resale and two-year apple to be.
Purchased for $549,000 in June of 2010, the 781 square foot one-bedroom has been on the market for a week seeking the same.

The sale of 818 Van Ness Avenue #203 closed escrow on Friday with a reported contract price of $579,000 ($741 per square foot), up 5.5 percent over the past two years on an apples-to-apples basis.

A Two-Year Artani (818 Van Ness Avenue) Apple To Be [SocketSite]
The Artani (818 Van Ness) Opens And A Plugged-In Reader Reports [SocketSite]
Artani (818 Van Ness) Inventory Starts To Return As Expected [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (11) | (email story)

April 26, 2012

100 Van Ness Repurposed, Redesigned And Rendered

100%20Van%20Ness%20Rendering.jpg

In the background of the aerial rendering for the proposed tower to rise at One Van Ness, the existing 400 foot building at 100 Van Ness lurks.

As proposed and rendered above and below, however, the old AAA headquarters will be re-skinned and re-purposed as a 399-unit apartment building with ground floor retail, 118 parking spaces, and a 12,000 square foot rooftop resident’s playground above.

100%20Van%20Ness%20Rendering%20Roof.jpg

Features of the proposed 29th floor roof deck (click image to enlarge) include fire pits, lounges, a dog walk, a hot tub, lawn, plants and trees.

And yes, there's a good reason why apartment buildings are currently all the rage.

An All-Star Architect's Design For The All Star Site At One Van Ness [SocketSite]
AAA Complex At Van Ness And Hayes About To Get A Jump Start [SocketSite]
Surprised By A Spike In San Francisco Rents? There's No Excuse. [Socketsite]

Posted by socketadmin at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (47) | (email story)

How One Rincon Could Really Become A Giant Ionic Breeze

Alcoa is currenlty testing EcoClean, a new coating for its Reynobond building panels.

As a photocatalyst, titanium dioxide interacts with sunlight to break down organic matter both on and floating around the surface of the building panels, leaving the organic matter sitting on the surface of the Reynobond panel, ready to be washed away. When it rains, water doesn’t bead on the surface. Instead, it collapses and runs evenly off the building, taking most of the broken down pollutants with it.
Reynobond with EcoClean actively works to remove pollutants by using sunlight, water vapor, and oxygen in the air to clean the air itself. In fact, 1,000 sqm / 10,000 sq ft² of Reynobond with EcoClean on your building can have approximately enough cleansing power to offset the smog created by the pollution output of four cars every day, which is the approximate air cleansing power of 80 trees every day.

In the words of a reader: "So if we coat One Rincon Hill in this stuff it won't just look like a giant Ionic Breeze, it will actually be one." There's still time for Tower Two.

Reynobond with EcoClean [alcoa.com]
No Story, Simply A Fresh SocketSite Perspective On One Rincon Hill [SocketSite]
The One Rincon Hill Tower Two Timing, Design And Details Scoop [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 7:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (2) | (email story)

April 25, 2012

The San Francisco Bay Guardian Sells (Out?)

135 Mississippi (www.SocketSite.com)

Union Property Capital (UPC) is in contract is to purchase the San Francisco Bay Guardian’s Potrero Hill headquarters building at 135 Mississippi for $6.5 million. Guardian owner Bruce Brugmann purchased the building for $4.7 million in 2002.

From the Business Times with respect to a bit of sale hypocrisy irony:

The Bay Guardian has been a vocal opponent of development in the city, railing against highrise construction, luxury housing, and zoning rules that favor tech and knowledge-based companies over more traditional blue-collar jobs.
Ironically, it was UPC that assembled and did the early planning on one of the most prominent highrises built in downtown San Francisco in the last decade: Tishman Speyer's two-tower Infinity project at 300 Spear St.
UPC also developed a data center at 365 Main St., built a luxury residential loft project at 150 Powell St., and repositioned SoMa buildings like 330 Townsend St. and 840 Brannan St. for dot-coms. The company also completed a condo conversion of a former rental building in Alamo Square — the sort of project that the Guardian routinely opposes in the interest of protecting the city's rental housing stock.

And yes, we do believe UPC has set its sights set on developing the property.

SF Bay Guardian seeks to cash out in hot real estate market [Business Times]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (8) | (email story)

April 23, 2012

Hugo Hotel Hangs On As Redevelopment Agency Is Dropped

200 6th Street Design

The proposed Kennerly Architecture & Planning designed nine-story mixed-use building slated to rise at 200 6th Street has been waylaid by the loss of San Francisco’s Redevelopment Agency which Mercy Housing had been counting on to finance the demolition and replacement of the existing four-story, and rather storied, Hugo Hotel.

Hugo Hotel in San Francisco (www.SocketSite.com)

As plugged-in people know, the Redevelopment Agency acquired the Hugo Hotel in 2009 for $4,600,000 by way of eminent domain.

Defending The Design For 200 6th Street And Adieu To Defenestration [SocketSite]
Sixth Street landmark ready to hang around a bit longer [Examiner]
And Now Back To The Hugo Hotel (And Eminent Domain On Sixth) [SocketSite]
Hugo Hotel's Flying Furniture Update, No Word On The Graffiti [SocketSite]
The Hugo Hotel Has A Date With A Different Kind Of Bench [SocketSite]
Eminent Domain Suit Semi-Successfully Snatches Hugo Hotel [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 3:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (39) | (email story)

Cathedral Hill Hotel Demolition Paperwork Filed, Poised To Fall

Proposed CPMC Cathedral Hill Hospital Site (Image Source: MapJack.com)

With a special Planning Commission hearing scheduled for Thursday, at which approvals for CPMC’s Long Range Development Plans, including a new Cathedral Hill Hospital, are expected to be approved following the "extraction" of $115 million in affordable housing, transit and streetscape concessions from California Pacific, as a plugged-in tipster reports, CPMC has officially applied for the permit to demolish the Cathedral Hill Hotel.

CPMC’s Long Range Development Plan Renderings And Draft EIR [SocketSite]
CPMC And The City Reach Agreement For Cathedral Hill Hospital Plan [SocketSite]
Planning Commission Special Meeting: CPMC's Development Plans [sf-planning]

Posted by socketadmin at 9:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (12) | (email story)

Apples-To-Apples, And 2008 To Today, On Russian Hill

1080 Chestnut #7D: Interior

As we wrote three months ago:

Back in March of 2008 we first featured the before and after floor plans for 1080 Chestnut #7D which had just hit the market listed for $1,350,000 at the time.
Having sold for $1,295,000 that July, the remodeled one-bedroom "located on one of Russian Hill's most distinguished flat blocks" returned to the market in early 2011 asking $1,149,000 but failed to find a buyer.
Yesterday, 1080 Chestnut #7D officially returned to the market listed for $999,000, 23 percent under its 2008 sale price on an apples-to-apples basis.

On Friday, the sale of 1080 Chestnut #7D closed escrow with a reported contract price of $975,000. Call it twenty-five percent ($320,000) under its July 2008 sale price on an apples-to-apples basis for the remodeled Russian Hill one-bedroom with views.

This Time It’s...Apples-To-Apples On Russian Hill [SocketSite]
A New Floor Plan And Major Remodel Turns An Apple Into An Orange [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 8:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (35) | (email story)

April 20, 2012

Let There Be The Light (And Rooftop Garden) Of Day At 601 Dolores

601 Dolores

As we first reported last year, it was the Children’s Day School that ended up purchasing the "Castle on the Park" at 601 Dolores with plans to convert the 17,000 square foot building from a private residence into a school.

Next week, San Francisco’s Planning Commission will review the Children’s Day School’s application for the conversion of 601 Dolores and its plans for the building.

As proposed, a roof deck and garden will be built upon the southeast corner of the building and the garage at 601 Dolores will become the school’s reception hall and classrooms, with the garage entrance on 19th Street becoming the school’s primary entrance.

601 Dolores Day School Entrance

And with respect to increased traffic concerns around the park, "CDS would have students that attend 601 Dolores dropped‐off at 333 Dolores Street and the students would walk to the school from there."

Castle On The Park (601 Dolores) In Contract For $6,600,000 [SocketSite]
Bonds, Tax-Exempt Bonds (To Fund Day's Purchase Of 601 Dolores) [SocketSite]
Sweet Jesus (So To Speak): 601 Dolores On The Market And Inside [SocketSite]
601 Dolores ("Castle on the Park") Conditional Use Request [sfplanning.org]

Posted by socketadmin at 6:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (10) | (email story)

April 17, 2012

The Chinese Hospital's Plans, Will The Mayor Make Demands?

835 Jackson

The original Chinese Hospital building at 835 Jackson was built in 1924 and converted to a Medical Administration Building for the hospital when the adjacent 43,368 square foot Chinese Hospital building at 845 Jackson was built in 1979.

835 Jackson Existing

As proposed, the 29,793 square foot building at 835 Jackson will be razed and in its place a new 101,545 square foot hospital and skilled nursing facility will rise.

835 Jackson Proposed

The existing hospital at 845 Jackson would become a Medical Administration and Outpatient Center in 2015 when the construction is finished as proposed.

With Mayor Ed Lee having successfully extracted over a hundred million dollars worth of affordable housing, transit and streetscape improvements in return for approval of CPMC’s plans to build a hospital on Cathedral Hill and rebuild St. Luke’s in the Mission, we’ll let you know what the Mayor demands for approval of the Chinese Hospital's project.

Chinese Hospital Replacement Project: 835-845 Jackson [sfplanning.org]
CPMC And The City Reach Agreement For Cathedral Hill Hospital Plan [SocketSite]

Posted by socketadmin at 11:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (57) | (email story)

April 4, 2012

2799 Pacific: The Behind The Scenes History And Plugged-In Scoop

2799 Pacific

A plugged-in reader delivers