The public hearing at which San Francisco’s Planning Commission could certify the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the City’s ambitious Central SoMa Plan has been pushed back to May 10.

The public hearing scheduled for this Thursday, April 12, has been converted into an “informational only” hearing with no action to be take at the time.

If the Central SoMa Plan’s EIR is successfully certified in May, an appeal of which is likely to follow, the Commission could then immediately vote to approve the plan (which would raise the proposed height limits for numerous neighborhood parcels, including an up-zoning of the Flower Mart site to allow development up to 270 feet in height, a 400-foot height limit for the Creamery/HD Buttercup parcels at the corner of Townsend and Fourth upon which Tishman Speyer is planning to build two swoopy towers, a re-revised 240-foot height limit for the 725 Harrison Street site to allow Boston Properties’ proposed office project to rise as rendered above, and the big redevelopment of the San Francisco Tennis Club site) and recommend its adoption by San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors.

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Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by RobBob

    The email I got said “due to a public noticing error.” I wonder what the error was. Seems a bit embarrassing.

  2. Posted by Jim

    They SHOULD be embarrassed.

  3. Posted by L . W. Roberts

    It is what this city does best… move back time.

    • Posted by Pablito

      That and certify ” environmental impact reports” for projects with clearly negative impacts on the environment. I.e. only 7,500 units of housing but enough office space for up to 45,000 additional workers – forcing large scale air pollution from suburban commuting…Sigh.

      • Posted by RobBob

        The notes that came along with the central soma plan said that it makes more sense for office space to be located near areas served by multiple transit lines. The claim is that this will allow more people to commute to work on transit, because the workplace itself is more transit accessible. This seems to make some sense. Maybe we should be up zoning and densifying our own suburban areas, i.e. the sunset.

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