Crane Cove Park

While originally slated to be bid for construction back in 2015, the contract to start clearing the nearly ten-acre waterfront site for San Francisco’s future Crane Cove park will soon be awarded and site prep should commence by the end of the year.

Once the site is prepped, which should be substantially completed by March, construction will begin in earnest and is slated to last a year.

The plans for Crane Cove Park include a new sandy shoreline and waterfront walk; a large open green for lounging and picnicking; native gardens, a multi-use lawn and playgrounds for the kids; a furnished sun deck and look-out pier; and the Crane Plaza/Keel Park and promenade which will accommodate farmers markets, food trucks and other large gatherings, along the waterfront between Mariposa and 19th Streets on the eastern edge of Dogpatch.

Crane Cove Park Schematic

Pier 70’s Building 109 at the southern edge of the Crane Cove Park site will provide parking, covered picnic sites and serve as a Park Pavilion, while Building 49 at 18th and Illinois will provide retail, restrooms and boat storage, while a new patio area just south of The Ramp restaurant will be open to the public but also serve as an extension of the restaurant’s operations.

Crane Cove Park: Northern Schematic

And it’s across the future extension of 18th/19th street to the south of Crane Cove Park that the Port is planning to build a surface parking lot for 250 cars.

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Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by Can't Think of Cool Name

    Looks great for the Ramp long-term, but I’d imagine it may be a little dusty and noisy short term on the patio.

  2. Posted by Adam

    Does the extension of 19th street extend into the portion of the site still in active use for ship repair?

  3. Posted by Notcom

    Nice bit of ironic artistic license in the rendering: the ship – an underloaded container? a break-bulk? – passing right next to the shoreline…far too close to be going to Oakland, but does SF still have any terminals left?

  4. Posted by Dave

    It’s great to see more green space in SF and especially along the Bay front.

    My only quibble with the design is the paucity of trees – In a city that is significantly tree challenged. The open grassy areas are fine, just wish they had put more tress along the perimeter (a double row for instance) or at least some shrubs.

    • Posted by Sierrajeff

      Going to be a lot more tree-challenged soon, if the native plant folks get their way – City wants to cut down literally thousands of trees in the city, including pretty much the full destruction of the Mt. Davidson forest. Insanity.

      • Posted by Dave

        Yes, I live on Mt. Davidson and that plan is insanity. Make it look like Twin Peaks? A bald mountain? Imagine how it will look coming up Portola if that huge swath of green that Mt. Davidson is covered in gives way to a total cut with low scraggly native plants not really visible from a distance? They’ve tried some natives on Twin Peaks and how is that working out?

        Its amazing to read about the City’s concern for the lack of a canopy in SF – compared to other cities, and plans to correct that. By planting thousands of tress. Yet the city wants to take out thousands of trees and even if many more tress are planted than taken out it will be 50, 60, 70 years before the existing paltry canopy could be restored.

        • Posted by BobN

          The whole “think global, act local” thing has gotten out of control. Instead of fighting for the preservation of California’s wild and semi-wild green space, people are throwing themselves at ruining urban forests. Urban forests serve the local, high density, population. They’re not supposed to be little time capsules of what once was. Go save what still is!!!

  5. Posted by GH

    Can they not finish the park area along Mission Bay North and South first!

  6. Posted by gentrified is a dirty word for clean

    Does the design for a sandy shoreline imply that the water here is safe for swimming?

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