January 11, 2013

Behind The Façade A Contemporary Interior Lurks

2121%20Divisadero.jpg

Built circa 1906, bought for $2,460,000 in 2000, and reconstructed in 2002, the Pacific Heights home at 2121 Divisadero Street has just returned to the market as new for $4,195,000 having been listed at that price for three months at the end of last year.

2121%20Divisadero%20Kitchen.jpg

While the traditional façade remains, the reconstructed interior is decidedly contemporary with an open kitchen, great room, and a barrel ceilinged top floor with roof deck.

2121%20Divisadero%20Top%20Floor.jpg

∙ Listing: 2121 Divisadero (4/3.5) 4,952 sqft - $4,195,000 [2121divisadero.com]

First Published: January 11, 2013 1:30 PM

Comments from "Plugged In" Readers

Odd there are no pictures of the front room.

Posted by: BobN at January 11, 2013 2:36 PM

Love the top floor, wish the rest of the house was more like it. Is the front room the one with the pool table?

Posted by: Michael at January 11, 2013 3:28 PM

Not my style at all, but interesting nonetheless. This Old House is currently airing a renovation project which involves totally gutting a historic Victorian and transforming the interior into Scandinavian modern.

Posted by: Mark at January 11, 2013 4:11 PM

It is unfortunate that these people did not just build a new house somewhere else and allow this to be restored by someone who appreciates history and old houses.
This is "facadism" of the extreme kind.

It appears that they are doing the same thing to the former two-flat building on the south side of Jackson, third building east of Broderick. Of course that building never had the character and quality that must have existed in this one.

Posted by: conifer at January 11, 2013 4:26 PM

Criminal.

Posted by: wc1 at January 11, 2013 9:42 PM

For this price shouldn't they at least try to hide the gas meter and trim the overgrown shrub?!

Posted by: GoodBuyBadTimes at January 12, 2013 2:09 PM

I like it.

Posted by: Mark F. at January 12, 2013 7:52 PM

"appreciate history and old houses". That's what museums are for. Who wants to live in a museum?

Posted by: hangemhi at January 14, 2013 10:19 AM

I am guessing that the house was lifted up to put the garage in under it. That said, it looks bizarre the way it sits now. I cannot get past the incongruous basement level and the rest of the building. At least TRY and make them work together. Maybe some ornimentation on the cememt to bring the look together?

Posted by: Connor at January 14, 2013 10:58 AM

I went to an open house prior to the remodel. While it was in dire need of repair and renovation, what has been done doesn't look like it preserved any of the original details, which is a shame. The original staircase, which was handcarved, is gone, as is the stained glass from the side as far as I can see. Don't get me wrong, this house had tons of deferred maintenance, but it is sad that is looks as if nothing was saved.

Posted by: Lori at January 15, 2013 9:56 AM

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