December 21, 2011

While Underwhelmed By The Finishes, We Do Like The Floor Plan

2040 Franklin #708 Floor Plan

We’re not so sure we would characterize the remodeling as "spectacular," but the floor plan for 2040 Franklin #708 is rather appealing with dual entrances to the one toilet and bath.

Having been listed and relisted seven times since 2008 when first asking $669,000, or $629,000 in early 2010, the 715 square foot Jackson Towers one-bedroom #708 was listed anew today once again, now asking $569,000.

∙ Listing: 2040 Franklin #708 (1/1.25) 715 sqft - $569,000 [Redfin]
2004 To 2010 (And Bank-Owned) For 2040 Franklin #1008 [SocketSite]

First Published: December 21, 2011 2:30 PM

Comments from "Plugged In" Readers

How is this anything but a 1/1? Adding another door to the toilet isn't the same as actually having 2 toilets.

Posted by: lofty at December 21, 2011 3:48 PM

Maybe 2 sinks and 2 configurations?

Config#1 - You can have your toilet plus a wash basin when you have guests
Config#2 - Have the bath + toilet as a real Master Bathroom

Pretty smart way to configure things, I'd say.

Posted by: lol at December 21, 2011 4:01 PM

Yeah, the extra sink definitely makes it an extra quarter bath, and having the separation is a smart way to take advantage of a small space.

Posted by: lyqwyd at December 21, 2011 4:40 PM

Great plan! And why don't we see much more of this level of functionality in bath designs in this market? Think about it - this (correctly listed 1/1.25) has no more fixtures and maybe not even more square footage than a single bathroom in a typical new condo 1/1 plan. But the two pocket doors ramp up the usability by a factor of ___ (big number). It seems almost everyone is willing to demand two sinks in a single/master bath but without regard to where they are placed. Here we have one placed in what could have been a closet for a commode, making it a powder room. [Or maybe it's the door to the hall that makes it a powder room?] The other sink is paired with the tub/shower in a space that can be closed off to the bedroom as needed with another space-saving pocket door. The only thing that could be better than this set up would be a true bath and a half, but with this plan we get a high percentage of the functionality of a true 1/1.5 at lower fixture cost and in less space.

Very well done, and again architects, if you're listening, we need a lot more of this level of attention to detail and innovation in baths for one bedroom condo plans!

Posted by: GoodBuyBadTimes at December 21, 2011 5:07 PM

^"why don't we see much more of this level of functionality in bath designs in this market?"

Because it doesn't meet current codes for adaptable & accessible units.

Older buildings didn't have to provide the fixture & door clearances, grab-bars, etc. that are required today for this type of building.

Posted by: rubber_chicken at December 21, 2011 5:44 PM

^ what? Grab bars and clearance? That's for commercial, not residential.

Posted by: 47yo hipster at December 21, 2011 7:12 PM

I think only 5% of units in new residential construction have to be adaptable/accessible.

Posted by: fancy rental at December 21, 2011 7:43 PM

47yo:
Adaptable baths are required in buildings with 3 or more units for dwellings at grade or those served by an elevator. They require blocking and space for grab-bars and specific clearances at doors and fixtures. Check out CBC chapter 11.

Posted by: rubber_chicken at December 22, 2011 8:16 AM


Very clean. I like it. (Mind you I wouldn't pay 569K...)

Having not grown up in the US it took me some time to get accustomed to having a toilet in the bathroom. Keeping the two separate is so much more civilized.

Posted by: Willow at December 22, 2011 11:05 AM

Quite small, probably quite loud. You can look out the window and fantasize about living in the Haas Lilienthal house.

Posted by: Snark17 at December 22, 2011 3:38 PM

I still don't completely get it. If you have one bathroom with 3 doors is that "1.5 baths" in MLS speak? If the toilet is reflected in a mirror so it looks like 2 toilets does that equal 2 bathrooms?

I like this config too. I used to have a 2/2 with a similar bathroom layout that I foolishly sold as a 2/2 rather than a 2/2.25. Are there any rules around this or is it all just wishful hyperbole trying to avoid the stark fact that there's only 1 bathroom in the unit?

Posted by: lofty at December 23, 2011 3:36 PM

I still don't completely get it. If you have one bathroom with 3 doors is that "1.5 baths" in MLS speak? If the toilet is reflected in a mirror so it looks like 2 toilets does that equal 2 bathrooms?

I like this config too. I used to have a 2/2 with a similar bathroom layout that I foolishly sold as a 2/2 rather than a 2/2.25. Are there any rules around this or is it all just wishful hyperbole trying to avoid the stark fact that there's only 1 bathroom in the unit?

Posted by: lofty at December 23, 2011 3:36 PM

Lofty, it ain't rocket science. A full bath generally has four fixtures. Sink, toilet, tub and shower.

A 3/4 bath is only 3 of those, i.e. sink, toilet, shower
A 1/2 bath is only 2 of those, i.e. sink and toilet
So since this has a separate entrance and an entirely separate sink (dual vanities would't count) they call this 1.25.

It ain't a perfect system, but it's pretty clear.

Posted by: R at December 23, 2011 4:57 PM

A full bath is a sink, toilet and tub (shower over the tub is still a full bath).

Posted by: futurist at December 23, 2011 5:13 PM

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