1268 Lombard: Demo on 3/16/09 (www.SocketSite.com)
It’s not down yet, but 1268 Lombard is on the losing side of its battle with the Granite wrecking crew (although it does appear to be putting up a good fight). No update on the investigation into whether or not the current owners “willfully neglected” the building in order to obtain a permit to demolish.
The “Resourceful” Demolition Of A Historic Resource? (1268 Lombard) [SocketSite]

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Comments from “Plugged-In” Readers

  1. Posted by Jimmy (No Longer Bitter)

    Willful neglect … cutting a few structural supports, what’s the difference?
    As long as the lot is put to good use (i.e. more housing) I don’t see a problem with expediting the demolition process.

  2. Posted by Really Really

    Losing its battle? That would be an understatement. That’s like saying I am losing my battle with weight.

  3. Posted by EH

    If there was any justice, they would be prohibited from building anything on this lot, Ellis Act style.

  4. Posted by DZinerSf

    This is really a shame. With so few structures that survived the ’06 fire, they really should have done more to save this.

  5. Posted by Delancey

    Do you suppose someone could open a few windows at the Pagoda Theater?

  6. Posted by Jimmy C

    This was a shack built with poor technique and materials when it was new.
    According to the preservationist logic, because it was around long ago it’s nostalgic and therefore should be saved without question. Then, I suppose we should keep polio around too for the nostalgic memories of the iron lung.

  7. Posted by hugh

    @ EH,
    That’s why there are landmark-designated vacant lots in Berkeley. Seems like the only recourse for developers totally ignoring historical preservation is to do that. it’s totally irrational, but makes sense.
    whether or not you see it as a worthless shack, it’s a pretty sad example of how flagrantly a developer can ignore historical preservation and get away with it. it was obviously purchased with the express intent of tearing it down (in spite of its status).

  8. Posted by hugh

    @ EH,
    That’s why there are landmark-designated vacant lots in Berkeley. Seems like the only recourse for developers totally ignoring historical preservation is to do that. it’s totally irrational, but makes sense.
    whether or not you see it as a worthless shack, it’s a pretty sad example of how flagrantly a developer can ignore historical preservation and get away with it. it was obviously purchased with the express intent of tearing it down (in spite of its status).

  9. Posted by EH

    According to the preservationist logic, because it was around long ago it’s nostalgic and therefore should be saved without question. Then, I suppose we should keep polio around too for the nostalgic memories of the iron lung.
    Right, because the effect is completely the same. However, by YOUR logic, perhaps we should codify into law that location trumps history every time. If that’s going to be the case, I sure wouldn’t mind seeing about 40 floors on top of the Paris Block.

  10. Posted by 45yo hipster

    EU- the ellis act has nothing to do with the granting of bldg permits. The ellis act basically prohibits landlords from renting out bldgs at market rents that have been ‘ellis acted’ for 5 yrs.
    And, I have not heard of a case in SF where an owner was granted an emergency demo permit AND was precluded from building on the lot. This sound reductive and punitive, something only a completely asinine city gov would contemplate. (come to think of it, this would be perfect for SF local politics.)

  11. Posted by lolcat_94123

    Damn progess – we should preserve everything. It think it would be swell to be a society of tee-pees and adobe mud huts.

  12. Posted by amused

    Nostalgia is pointless.
    The shack was unimportant.
    Progress wins.
    For once.

  13. Posted by Dude

    Amen, amused. A year or two from now, nobody will even remember this hovel. Nor should they.

  14. Posted by Wolf

    The guys from Granite did a great job knocking down this piece of San Francisco history. There it goes—out to the dump. It’s just progress. Don’t knock it.

  15. Posted by Wolf

    The guys from Granite did a great job knocking down this piece of San Francisco history. There it goes—out to the dump. It’s just progress. Don’t knock it.

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